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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

Library of the 

Museum of 

Comparative Zoology 



m'h.^ 



BuLLQtln OF THE 

Museum of 



6 m para five 






ogy 



Volume 137 
1968-1969 



'* 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 02138 U.S.A. 



CONTENTS 



No. 1. The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea. Part III. Harpalinae (Con- 
tinued): Perigonini to Pseudomorphini. By Philip J. Darlington. 
July, 1968 1 

No. 2. Geographic Variation in Anolis distichus Cope ( Lacertilia, Iguan- 
idae ) in the Bahama Islands and Hispaniola. By Albert Schwartz. 
September, 1968 255 

No. 3. Ammonoids of the Late Scythian (Lower Triassic). By Bernhard 

Kummel. April, 1969 311 





/^K«J 



Museum of 

Comparative 

Zoology 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 

Part III. Harpalinae (Continued): 

Perigonini to Pseudomorphini 



p. J. DARLINGTON, JR. 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY VOLUME 137, NUMBER 1 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A. JULY 30, 1968 



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© The President and Fellows of Harvard College 1968. 



THE CARABID BEETLES OF NEW GUINEA PART III. HARPALINAE 
(CONTINUED): PERIGONINI TO PSEUDOMORPHINI 



p. J. DARLINGTON, JR.^ 



•■ CONTENTS 

Introduction to Part III. 

Purpose; other parts; acknowledgments _.„ 2 

Sources and disposition of material 2 

Policies and methods; type examinations; 

measurements; drawings 3 

Localities 4 

Findings 5 

Taxonomic section 

Tribe Perigonini 5 

Perigona 6 

Tribe Licinini 14 

Badister 15 

Physolaesthus 15 

Omestcs 16 

Dicrochile 16 

Microferonia 18 

(Tribe Amblystomini) 19 

( Aniblystoinits) 19 

Tribe Chlaeniini 20 

Chlaeniits 1 20 

Tribe Oodini 30 

Anairichis 31 

Oodes 32 

Tribe Harpalini 38 

Gnathaphanus 4 1 

Diuphoromerus 42 

Hijphurpax 1 44 

Lecanomerus 45 

Chydaeiis 47 

Platyrnciopus 48 

TricJiotichnus 48 

Hcirpaloxenus _*._: 59 

Lyter ; 63 

Coleolissus 64 

Hyphacreon 66 

Anoplogenius 68 

Egadroma 69 

Stenolophus 71 

Acupalpiis 72 

Tribe Anaulacini 76 

^ Work supported by National Science Founda- 
tion Grant GB-93; see also p. 2. 

* Bull. Mus. C 



Odoutomasoreus 76 

Amuilactis 77 

AeplinkUus 77 

Cuphoia 78 

Tribe Cyclosomini 78 

Sarotlirocrepis 78 

Tribe Lebiini 80 

{ Soniotrichus) 82 

Aristolehia 83 

Lehia 85 

Lach noderma 89 

Sinurits QQ 

Stenotelus 90 

Misceliis 91 

Holcoderti.s 94 

Minuthodcs 95 

Catuscopus 100 

Pericalus no 

Coptfldera 1 10 

Minuphloetis 117 

Agonochilu 1I8 

Oxyodotitus 122 

Moc}ithcni.s 122 

( Mochtheroides) 123 

DolicJtoctL^ 124 

Stricklandia 132 

Peliocypas 134 

Celacnephes 135 

Syntom us 135 

Microlestes 135 

Apristus 137 

( Plochionus) 138 

Parena 133 

Anch i.sta 139 

Eiidynomena 140 

Denietrida 140 

Phlococarahus 183 

Trigunotlwps 184 

Nototarus ....'. 185 

Anomotarus 186 

Tribe Pentagonicini 191 

Pentagonica 192 

Parascopodes 195 

Scopodes 197 

Tribe Hexagoniini 202 

omp. Zool., 137(1): 1-253, July, 1968 1 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, Xo. 1 



CONTENTS 

Hexagonia 202 

Tribe Odacanthini 203 

Collium 204 

Casnoidca - 207 

Bcisi.stich us 208 

Clurcncia 209 

Dicraspeda 210 

Lachnotlionix 214 

Etidalia 214 

Dobodura 215 

Tribe Dryptini 216 

Drtjpta - .' 216 

Desera 218 

Tribe Zuphiini 218 

Zuphitim 219 

Planctes 220 

Tribe Helluodini 222 

Pofiona^Iossus- 222 

Tribe Ilclluonini 228 

Creagris 229 

IlcUuoiiidius 229 

Ih'lbiopapua 232 

HelUiosoma 233 

HcUuodcma _. „ 233 

Gigadcina 233 

Tribe Brathinini 234 

Phcro})so])}\its 234 

Bracliinus 239 

Tribe Pseudomorphini 239 

Adelatopus 240 

Cn/pt(>cc))halomorpha 242 

S))haU(>nH)rpli(i 242 

INTRODUCTION TO PART III 

Purpose: other parts: acknoidcdiimcnts. 
Tliis is the third part of a taxonomic survey 
of the beetles of the family Carabidae 
(predaeeoiis ground beetles) of the island 
of New Guinea.- The present part covers 
the tribes of the subfamily Ilarpalinae from 
Perigonini through Pseudomorphini. and 
thus completes coverage of the famiK 
Carabidae in the approximate order of the 
Junk-Schenkling Catalogue (Csiki 1932- 
f933). I'art IV, which is now being pre- 
pared, will be primarily a summary, analy- 

- Part I, covering the Cieiiidelinae, Carabinae, 
and Flarpalinac llnontili Ptiiostichini (in tlic ordc-r 
of the Junk-Schenkhn!4 Catalogue) and Part II, 
covering the Agonini, are in the Bulletin nt the 
Museum of Comparative Zoology: Part I, in \'ol. 
126, No. .3, 1962, pp. 321-564, 4 plates; and Part 
II, in Vol. 107, No. 3, 1952, pp. 87-252, 4 plates. 
(Because of my special interest in the Agonini, 
Part II was written and published lalore Part I.) 



sis, and discussion of the New Guinean 
carabid fauna as a whole. Among subjects 
to be considered are the general nature of 
the fauna, its geographic relationships and 
origins, its ccologic composition, and its 
evolution including specific evolutionary 
trends (toward wing atrophy, etc.) and 
evolutionary radiations on New Guinea. 
However, Part IV will include also a taxo- 
nomic supplement to list important new 
records of previously recorded species and 
to describe a number of additional species 
received recently, especially new Agonini 
from high altitudes. 

I have already acknowledged, in Parts I 
and II, aid received from the Guggenheim 
Foundation. I have now to acknowledge 
also aid received from the National Science 
Foundation ( Grant GB-93 ) . which has sup- 
ported my work on Carabidae of Ne^^ 
Guinea in many ways, including publica- 
tion of the results. 

For meticulous editing and typing of the 
manuscript of Part III, I am indebted to 
Mrs. Judith Koivumaki, and for the accurate 
outline drawings and realistic w atercolors, 
to Mrs. Mary Catron. 

Sources (iiul disposition of material. Prin- 
cipal initial sources of material used in my 
\\'ork on New Guinean C^arabidae ha\e been 
acknowledged in Part I, page 323, and Part 
II, pages 90-91. However, notable addi- 
tional material has been received recently. 
Most important are thousands of specimens 
collected for the Bishop Muscnmi by several 
entomologists und(>r the direction of Dr. 
J. L. (>ressitt; Mr. Josei Sedlacck and his 
wife and son have obtained an especially 
large number of Carabidae for the Bishop 
Museum. An important collection has hcvu 
submitted for stud\ also b\- the Department 
ol Agriculture, I'ort Mor(\sb\-. through the 
kindness of Mr. J. j. II. S/cnl-I\an\'; this 
collection includc\s much matcMial from the 
Port Moresby area, and also specimens 
from other localities including some Irom 
high altitudes. Sent with this collection, 
but belonging to him personalK', is a fine- 
lot of Carabidae collected bv Dr. U. W. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



Hornabrook; this too includes material from 
high altitudes. A collection submitted by 
the Australian Commonwealth Scientific 
and Industrial Research Organization, at 
Canlierra, includes specimens from the 
Morehead River, on the south coast of 
Papua almost opposite the tip of Cape 
York; several Australian species not known 
elsewhere in New Guinea were found at 
this locality. And an interesting collection 
has been submitted by the South Australian 
Museum, including much material from 
Mt. Lamington, Papua. 

Because different collections have been 
received at different times, and because 
different portions of my manuscript have 
been finished at different times, I have not 
set a single deadline for material included 
in the present part of my work. I have 
simply used in each case the specimens 
available when a given group was studied, 
with only a few especially important addi- 
tional records interpolated later. Additional 
noteworthy records will be included in the 
supplement in Part IV, referred to above. 
Several of the most productive New 
Guinean carabid collectors, whose names 
appear many times in the following pages, 
are associated with single museums. In 
order to save space, I shall cite these col- 
lectors without repeating the names of their 
museums. The persons in question, and the 
museums with which they are associated 
and to which their specimens belong, are: 
(Ludwig) Biro: Hungarian National 

Museum, Budapest 
(Miss L. Evelyn) Cheesman: British 

Museum 
(P. J.) Darlington .(Jr. ): Museum of 
Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts, abbreviated M.C.Z. 
(J. L. ) Gressitt: Bishop Museum, Plono- 

lulu 
Sedlacek(s): Bishop Museum, Honolulu 
( Citation of this name in the singular 
indicates Mr. Josef Sedlacek; in the 
plural, additional or different members 
of the Sedlacek family: Marie and/or 
J. H. Sedlacek) 



(L. J.) Toxopeus: Leiden Museum 
Other museums and collections of which 
the names are abbreviated are: 

American Museum of Natural Ilistorv 
(New York): A.M.N.H. 

California Academy of Sciences, San 
Francisco: Cal. Acad. 

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial 
Research Organization, Canberra, Aus- 
tralia: C.S.I.R.O. 

United States National Museum, Wash- 
ington, D. C: U.S.N.M. 

Policies and methods; type examinations; 
measurements; drawings. My work is 
second-stage taxonomy ( see Part I, pp. 328- 
330). My methods have been described in 
Part I, page 330, and Part II, pages 91ff. 
However, I should repeat and stress certain 
things. I have tried to be reasonably con- 
sistent in preparing descriptions but have 
not followed a single model exactly. I 
have treated some tribes and some genera 
in much more detail than others, the rule 
being to give the information that has 
seemed worth giving in each case. My 
descriptions do follow a basic form but are 
flexible in detail. I do not like check-list 
taxonomy, in which descriptions are (in 
effect) drawn by inserting adjectives in 
blank spaces in a standard form. This kind 
of taxonomy is easy, but it is likely to be 
poor taxonomy. I think it is better to 
describe each species individually, following 
of course some sort of basic pattern, and if I 
state under one species that a character is 
striking, I see no reason to state (say) 
twenty times under other species that it is 
not striking. 

Although the present part is consistent 
with Parts I and II in general, I have made 
a few slight changes of usage to conform 
to two publications that have appeared 
recently. One is the "Style Manual for 
Biological Journals," pulilished in 1960 bv 
the American Institute of Biological Sci- 
ences, 2000 P St., NW, Washington, D. C, 
20016. The other is the revised edition 
( 1964 ) of the International Code of Zoologi- 
cal Nomenclature. I have in general adopted 



BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol 137, No. 1 



the details of style suggested by the former, 
and ha\'e tried to follow the rules and most 
recommendations of the latter. However, 
although I have followed the Style Manual 
in most ways including most abbreviations, 
I have occasionally preferred to follow 
Webster's Collegiate Dictionary on points 
of general style where I see no reason why 
biologists should be different. 

References listed under tribes, genera, 
and species are limited to items directly 
concerned with New Guinea plus selected 
items likely to be specially useful to workers 
on New Guinean Carabidae. 

Type examinations: In the present part of 
my work I have indicated what types of 
previously described species have been 
seen and not seen. I have borrowed for 
study a few types in especially difficult 
genera in which my work has been in 
effect revisionary ( in Perigona, for ex- 
ample), but I have not attempted to see or 
to borrow types in most cases. There are 
two reasons for this. First, I do not think 
types should be loaned merely to confirm 
identifications in faunal work, especially 
when the types come from outside the area 
under study, in the present case often from 
other islands or from Australia rather than 
Irom New Guinea. And second, H. E. 
Andrewes saw many of the types in question 
and made comparisons with them (see my 
Part I, p. 325), and my study of the An- 
drewes Collection has enabled me to place 
not only his own but also most of the older 
Oriental species with reasonable confidence. 
I do, however, plan to see many of the 
older types, including those in Paris, before 
completing Part IV, so that I should be 
able to correct errors of identification then. 

Measurements. Statements of j^roportions 
have been calculated (with a slide rule) 
Irom actual measurements made with a 
ruled disc in the ocular of a stereoscopic 
microscope. Proportions eannol be esti- 
mated satisfactorily by eye. When possible, 
the proportions are based on measurements 
of an average-looking 6 9 . The specimens 
thus measured are usually specified in a 



paragraph headed Measured specimens, but 
this paragraph is omitted under species of 
which only one or two indi\iduals are 
known. Measurements of length and width 
are extremes of all available specimens. 

Drawings. My drawings are designed 
primarily to show gross form, which is very 
difficult to describe in words. Mouthparts, 
antennae, and legs are sketched in semi- 
diagrammatically. The drawings have been 
outlined by Mrs. Mary Catron (usually 
with use of a crosslined disc in the ocular 
of a stereoscopic microscope), checked by 
me ( the checking including measuring and 
calculating of proportions ) , and then inked 
by Mrs. Catron. I have not tried to figure 
all species or even all new ones, but have 
tried to show unusual ones and also new 
species that are based on only one or two 
specimens. I expect to deposit representa- 
tive sets of specimens in museums in Lon- 
don, Honolulu, Canberra, and elsewhere, as 
well as in the continental United States, 
and persons working on New Guinean 
Carabidae in the future should use m\- 
specimens rather than figures of them \\'hich 
( like all figures ) are sure to be inadequate. 
I have usually not used and therefore not 
illustrated genitallic characters. I expect to 
discuss this matter — when and how to use 
genitallic characters in carabid taxonomy — 
in Part IV. 

Localities. I plan to include in Part IV 
a map showing, as far as possible, all 
localities at which C>arabidae ha\e been 
obtained in New Guinea. In the meantime 
the preliminary map published in Part II, 
page 93, shows my own localities, most ol 
Miss Cheesman's, and some others, and the 
sketch map in Part I, page 326 shows the 
route of my collecting on the Bismarck 
Range. Also, the Rishoi) Museum has 
issued a 19-page "List of New (hiinea 
Localities" (to 1966) which gi\es approxi- 
mate latitud(\s, longitudes, and altitudes ol 
the localities ol Hishop Museum collectors 
and ol some other persons. This list is, I 
suppose, a\ailal)le on recjuest. I have used 
it as a standard h)r spt-Uing ol place names. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 5 



Certain localities have become especially 
important in the course of my work. 
Dobodura, Papua, where I collected from 
March to July 1944 (see Part I, pp. 325- 
326), is by far the best known lowland 
locality in New Guinea, for Carabidae. 
Wau, in the Morobe District, N-E. N. G., is 
by far the best known middle-altitude 
locality, thanks principally to the efforts of 
the Sedlaceks. And Mt. Wilhelm on the 
Bismarck Range, N-E. N. G. (where I 
collected), and the Snow Mts., West N. G. 
(where Toxopeus collected during the 
Netherlands Indian-American (Third Arch- 
bold) Expedition of 1938-1939), are the 
only venj-higJi-altitude localities well known 
for Carabidae. Comprehensive collections 
from other localities, especially at high 
altitudes, are much needed to show at 
what intervals localized species replace 
each other on New Guinea. Until this is 
known, the total number of species of 
Carabidae on the island cannot even be 
guessed at closely. 

Additional evidence that the label 
"Dor(e)y" has been wrongly placed on 
many of Wallace's Carabidae that prob- 
ably really came from Celebes or the Moluc- 
cas is given in the present part of my work: 
see, for example, under AmbJystonius (p. 
20). For general discussion of this locality 
see Part I, pages 330-331. Although many 
specimens so labeled evidently did not 
come from Dorey, Wallace did go there. 
Some of his field notes from there are 
quoted under Catascopus in the present 
part of my work (p. 102). 

Findings. Although analysis and discus- 
sion of the New Guinean carabid favma as 
a whole will be postponed to Part IV, a 
few special points are worth noting now. 

Several genera that are chiefly Australian 
have been found at high altitudes on New 
Guinea, Java, and sometimes other islands 
in the Malay Archipelago. These genera 
include Mecyclothorax (Part I, pp. 498, 
505); Microferonia (present part, p. 18); 
and Scopodes (present part, p. 197). One 
genus, Chydaeus (p. 47), has been fomid 



with an opposite pattern of occurrence, on 
the mainland of Asia and at high altitudes 
on mountains in the Malay Archipelago 
east to New Guinea. However, Bemhidion 
and Trechiis have not been found on moun- 
tains in New Guinea, although Asiatic stocks 
of these genera have reached high moun- 
tains farther west in the Malay Archipelago 
(Darlington, 1959, Pacific Insects, Vol. 1, 
pp. 331-345). 

Important evolutionary patterns, of not- 
able radiations of Carabidae on New 
Guinea, have been found in the Agonini 
(Part I) and are described and discussed 
for several genera treated in the following 
pages. The most striking, in fact exciting, 
case is in the lebiine genus Demetrida, 
which seems to be in the midst of an 
evolutionary explosion. The situation among 
these diversely colored carabid beetles in 
the mountain rain forests of New Guinea 
parallels in some ways the situation among 
the birds of paradise in the same forests. 
I have seen about 1250 specimens of 
Demetrida from New Guinea, representing 
apparently 56 species, all new! See discus- 
sion under the genus (pp. 142-143) for 
further details. Less striking, but neverthe- 
less important, radiations of species chiefly 
within the confines of New Guinea are 
described in Trichotichnus (pp. 48-59), 
Catascopus (pp. 101-110), Dolichoctis (pp. 
124-132), Anomotarus (pp. 186-191), 
Scopodes (pp. 197-202), Dicraspeda (pp. 
210-214), and IleUuonidius (pp. 229-232). 

TAXONOMIC SECTION 
Tribe PERIGONINI 

Plattjnini group Perigonae G. H. Horn 1881, Trans. 

American Ent. Soc. 9, p. 143. 
Perigonini Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, 

Harpalinae 5, p. 894 ( see for synonymy and 

additional references ) . 
Jedlicka 1964, Reichenbachia 2, No. 61, pp. 267- 

274 ( Oriental forms ) . 
Perigonitae Jeannel 1941, Rev. frangaise d'Ent. 8, 

p. 137. 
Perigonidae Jeannel 1948, Coleop. Carabiques de 

la Region Malgache, Part 2, p. 733. 

The taxonomic limits of this tribe and its 



6 Bulletin Museum of Comparaiive Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



relation to other tribes of Carabidae are 
doubtful but need not be discussed here. 
The only genus of the tribe in New Guinea 
is Perigona itself (sensu lato). 

Genus PERIGONA Castelnau 

Castelnau 1835, Etude Ent., p. 151. 

Sloane 1903, Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales 

28, p. 635. 
Andievves 1929, Tijdschrift voor Ent. 72, p. 326 

( Suniatran species ) . 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Haipalinae 

5, p. 895 (see for synonymy and additional 

references ) . 
Jedlicka 1935, Neue Carabiden aus Ostasien, Part 

10, pp. 17-19 (Philippine species). 
1964, Reichenbachia 2, No. 61, pp. 267- 

274 ( Oriental species ) . 
Jeannel, see references under tribe, above. 
Euriipcri<iona Jeannel 1941, Rev. francaise d'Ent. 

8, pp. 138, 149 (new synonymy). 
Subgenus Trechicus Leconte 1853, Trans. Ameri- 
can Philosophical Soc. 10, p. 386. 

Dkigno.sis. Small Tachijs- or Trcchiis-\ike 
Carabidae; with usually 2 setae over each 
eye; apical segments of palpi rather long, 
usually subconical; other technical char- 
acters given by Jeannel. 

Description. None needed here, except 
note that all known New Guinean species 
are fully winged. 

Tiij)e species. Of Ferigona, P. pallida 
Castelnau of Africa; of Eun/perifi,ona, P. 
j)rocera Fauvel of Java; of Trechicus, T. 
umhripennis Leconte (= Perigona nigriceps, 
below ) . 

Generic distribution. World-wide in 
tropical and warm temperate regions. S(>e 
also 4th paragraph of following Notes. 

Notes. Ennjperigona Jeannel is based on 
Perigona procera Fauvel, a very large 
species with maxillary palpi long, slender, 
with penultimate segments relatively long. 
Perigona rex (below) would go in Euryperi- 
goruu if this genus were recognized. How- 
ever, "Euri/])crigonu' nitida Jeannel 1941 
{= Perigona grandis Jedlicka 1935) of die 
Philippines has maxillary palpi relatively 
shorter and with pcMiultimate segments 
shorter than in procera, and tends to con- 
nect the latter with more typical Perigona, 



and I do not think generic separation is 
advisable. 

Jeannel divides Perigona into 2 subgenera 
which seem natural and useful. They differ 
in arrangement of submarginal elytral 
punctures and they differ also in habits: 
Perigona sensti stricto occurs (in my ex- 
perience) only or mostly on or in logs or 
rotting wood; subgenus Trechicus, among 
dead leaves or debris on the ground, usuallv 
in forest. Perigona (Trechicus) nigriceps 
( Dejean ) has extended its ecological range 
to include fermenting vegetation and vari- 
ous plant materials carried by man, and 
has been spread over all the warmer parts 
of the world. 

Variation of supraocular and lateral 
prothoracic setae in this genus is note- 
worthy. In rev (below) all these setae are 
absent. In P. lata Andrewes of Sumatra 
the anterior supraocular and median-lateral 
prothoracic setae are absent in both type 
and "cotype" in the British Museum. And 
in P. astrolahica Csiki the posterior-lateral 
prothoracic setae are present or absent, as 
described inider this species below. 

Species of Perigona are numerous in 
tropical Asia and the Malay Archipelago. 
Fourteen occur in New Guinea. However, 
only 5 (nigriceps and 4 endemic species) 
occur in Australia (Darlington, 1964, Psxche 
71, pp. 125-129). The New Guinean 
Perigona fauna is therefore Oriental in 
general naturt> and diversity, and it is Ori- 
ental also in relationships of most species, 
so far as relationships can be determined. 

Farlier ke\s to specic\s of Perigona of the 
Malay Archipelago (Andrewes 1929; Jed- 
licka 1935, 1964) and Australia (Sloane 
1903) have been based principalh' on size 
and color, but most ol the 14 New Guinean 
species haxc diagnostic structural char- 
acters, as the follow ing Key shows. I am 
indebted to Dr. Z. Kaszab h)r an opportu- 
uit\ to examine the t> pes ot Csikis New 
( iuiiicaii species. 

""JMic I ol low lug species leeorded Ironi New 
Guinea are still unknown to ine, and are 
not included in the Key. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



SPECIES OF PERIGONA PREVIOUSLY 
RECORDED FROM NEW GUINEA BUT 
NOT RECOGNIZED FROM DESCRIPTION 

Perigona litura (Perroud & Montrousier) 

Perroud & Montrousier 1864, Ann. Soc. Linneenne 

Lyon 11, p. 72 (Trcchiis). 
And'rewes 1929, Tijdschrift voor Ent. 72, p. 372 

(in key). 

1933, Tijdschrift voor Ent. 76, p. 3C3. 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

5, p. 897 (see for additional references). 

This species was described from New 
Caledonia. It is listed by Csiki from sev- 
eral islands in the Malay Archipelago, in- 
cluding New Guinea, but I cannot find the 
source of the New Guinean record. An- 
drewes did not know the species. Details 
given in the original description, and the 
fact that the type(s) occurred in detritus, 
suggest that it may be a color form of 
nig,nceps. 

Perigona subcordata Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 730. 

This species was described from the 
Kei Islands and is likely to occur in New 
Guinea. The size and other details suggest 
that it may be an earlier name for astrolabica 
Csiki. 

Perigona suturaiis Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 728. 

The type was collected at Sorong, West 
New Guinea, by Beccari and D'Albertis, 
and is now in the Genoa Museum. Putzeys' 
description does not permit an exact deter- 
mination but suggests a small specimen of 
astrolabica Csiki or a large one of sub- 
cyanescens Putzeys. 

Key to Species of Perigona of New Guinea 

1. Group of 3 punctures in outer submarsinal 
channel of elytron (at % or % of elytral 
length) forming a straight line {Perigona 
scnsii stricto) 2 

- These 3 punctures forming a triangle ( sub- 
genus Trechiciis) 9 

2. Supraocular and lateral prothoracic setae 
absent; very large (9.4-12.4 mm) (p. 

8 ) rex 



- Two pairs supraocular and usually 2 pairs 
lateral prothoracic setae present; size 
smaller 3 

3. Frontal foveae weak, subobsolete; elytra 
each with 2 dorsal punctures, no subapical 
puncture above marginal channel; length 

c. 2.0-2.5 mm (p. 8) pygmaea 

- Frontal foveae short but distinct, margined 
externally by weak elevations; elytra with 
3 punctures, the 3rd either posteriorly on 
disc or subapically above marginal channel; 
usually larger 4 

4. Elytra with 3rd (posterior) dorsal puncture 
on disc, separated from marginal channel 
by more than width of latter; if in doubt, 
refer here specimens over 4 mm long „ 5 

- Elytra with 3rd puncture farther back, just 
above edge of marginal channel 7 

5. Posterior dorsal elytral punctures less than 
Yw of elytral length from apex; length c. 
4-6 mm (p. 9) astrolabica 

- Posterior dorsal elytral punctures more than 
Yxo of elytral length from apex; usually 
smaller 6 

6. Form normal, moderately broad and de- 
pressed; length c. 3.3-4.0 mm (p. 9) _... 
sxihcijanescens 

- Form narrower, subcylindrical; length 2.6- 
3.7 mm (p. 10) papimna 

7. Larger, c. 4.5 mm; dark castaneous with 
reddish suture and appendages (p. 10 ) - rossi 

- Smaller; // approaching rossi in size, form 
more depressed and color testaceous ._._ - 8 

8. Depressed; nearly uniform testaceous with 
head browner but elytra not plagiate; length 
slightly over 3 mm (p. 10) livens 

- Less depressed; partly testaceous but with 
head and much of elytral discs darker; 
length under 3 mm (p. 11) plagiata 

9. Submarginal channel of elytra behind 
puncture-triangle (at % or % of elytral 
length ) wide, with bottom flat or convex .. 10 

- Submarginal channel behind puncture-tri- 
angle very narrow 12 

10. Color cither testaceous with dark head and 
elytral apices or brownish castaneous with 
head slightly darker and suture paler; eyes 
large, forming c. right angles with neck; 
front and neck with distinct c. isodiametric 
reticulation (p. 11) nigriceps 

- Color dark castaneous with suture not or 
not much paler; eyes variable; microreticu- 
lation of head often less distinct, often ( not 
always) transverse posteriorly 11 

11. Eyes larger; microsculpture of posterior 
part of head ( if visible ) not obviously 
transverse; length usually c. 3.2—3.6 mm 
(rarely smaller) (p. 12) erimae 

- Eyes smaller and less prominent; micro- 
sculpture of posterior part of head (if 



8 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



visible) more trans\'erse; length c. 2.7- 
3.3 mm (rarely larger) (p. 12) --_ hidovici 

12. Prothorax with sides not strongly sinuate 
and posterior angles not denticulate; length 

c. 2.8-3.3 nnn (p. 13) lebioides 

- Sides of prothorax strongly sinuate or 
posterior angles denticulate 13 

13. Sides of prothorax strongly sinuate about 
% of length before base; (fine) micro- 
sculpture present; length c. 3.4 mm (p. 

13 ) cordens 

- Sides of prothorax nearly straight and con- 
verging posteriorly, but posterior angles 
aliruptly promini'ntly denticulate; micro- 
sculpture absent or nearly so; length c. 
3.2-3.4 mm (p. 14) dcntifcr 

Perigona is.s.) rex n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 1; very large, broad, 
depressed; brownish castaneous, lower sur- 
face and legs more reddish; rather shining, 
reticulate microsculpture fine, lightly im- 
pressed, c. isodiametric on head, slightly 
transverse on pronotum and elytra. Head 
0.58 and 0.60 width prothorax; mandibles 
shorter and more curved than usual in 
genus; eyes rather small but prominent, 
enclosed behind by genae; antennae with 
middle segments c. 1V-' X long as wide; 
maxillary palpi slightly shorter than in P. 
proccra Fauvel, with apical segments slightly 
more conical, and with subapical segments 
c. equal length of apical ones; frontal im- 
pressions vague; supraocular setae absent; 
mentum with a long, triangular tooth. 
Prothorax: width length 1.64 and 1.56; 
base/apex c. 1.33 and 1.22 (exact measure- 
ments imjiossible because basal angles 
broadly rounded); lateral setae absent; disc 
with fine middle line, other imjiressions 
vague. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.20 
and 1.24; striae absent or faintly indicated; 
each elytron with 2 to 4 dorsal punctures 
(variation individual, sometimes xms\in- 
metric), anterior puncture larth(>r than 
others from suture. Secondary .sexual char- 
acters: i front tarsi scarcely dilated but 
usually with inconspicuous 2-seriate squa- 
mae on first 3 segments below (only near 
apex of 1st segment, and soiiietimes missing. 



perhaps broken off); S with posterior 
femora dentate on upper posterior side near 
apex; $ with usually 3, 9 4 or 5 seta- 
bearing punctures each side last ventral 
segment. Measurements: length 9.4-12.4; 
width 3.(S-5.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 9 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,344) 
from Sepalakembang, Salawaket Rge., N-E. 
N. G., 1920 m, holotype Sept. 11-14 and 
paratype Sept. 15, 1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr.); 
and the following additional paratvpes. 
N-E. N. G.: 2, Wau, Morobe Dist., 1400 m. 
Mar. 29, 19^3 (Sedlaceks); 1, same locality, 
1650 m, Feb. 23, 1962 (Sedlaceks); 1 L 
Feramin, 1200-1500 m, May 2.3-31, 1959 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 1 c? , Okapa 
(Busa), [1650-1800 m], Oct. 17, 1964 
( Homabrook ) ; 1 c^ , Morae, Kukukuku 
[Rge.], E. Highlands, 6000 ft. (c. 1850 m), 
Mar. 1, 1964 ( Hornabrook ) . West N. G.: 
1 A , Mt. Cyclops, 3500 ft. (1067 m). Mar. 
1936 (Cheesman). 

Mea.sured specimens. The 6 holotype 
and 9 paratype from Sepalakembang. 

Notes. This remarkable species would go 
in Eiiryperip,ona if the latter were recog- 
nized (see discussion under genus). So 
far as I know it is unicpie in Feriiiona in loss 
of all supraocular and latcMal prothoracic 
setae and in the toothed posterior i 
femora. It is comparable to P. proccra 
Fauvel of Java in size but is broader, and 
proccra has the above-mentioned setae and 
does not have toothed A femora. 

Perigona is.s.) pygmaea Andrewes 

Andrewes 1930, Treubia, Supplement 7, pp. 3.34. 
345. 

Description (for recognition only). A 
very small Pcriiiona characterized by wt-ak 
frontal sulci and absence of 3rd (subapical) 
eKtral punctures; IcMigth c. 2.0-2.5 mm. 

Type. Vvo\\\ Bum, collected by Toxo- 
peus; now in British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Gtnnea. I*apiia: 4, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July lf>44 (Darlington). 
N-E. N. G.: 2, lower Busu R., Iluon Pen.. 
Mav 12 and 17, 1955 (E. O, Wilson. M.C.Z., 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 9 



1 specimen numbered 1056 ) ; 20, Sattclberg, 
1899 ( Biro ) ; 3, Stephansort, Astrolabe Bay, 
1898, 1900 (Biro); 5, Aitape, Aug. 1944 
(Darlington). West N. G.: 12, Maffin 
Bay, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. I have this species also from 
Leyte and Luzon in the Philippines, and 
have examined Andrewes' type from Biiru. 
My Dobodura specimens were taken under 
bark of rotting logs in rain forest. 

Of all New Guinean Peritonei, this 
seemed most likely to include short-winged 
individuals, but I have examined all speci- 
mens listed above, and all are in fact long- 
winged. 

Perigona is.s.) asfrolabica Csiki 

Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 21, p. 172. 

Description. None required here; size, 
and number and position of dorsal elytral 
punctures are diagnostic, in New Guinea; 
length 4.3-6.0 mm except only 3.8 mm in 
an apparent dwarf of this species from 
Dobodura. 

Tijpe(s). From Stephansort, Astrolabe 
Bay, N-E. N. G., collected by Biro in 1898; 
in Hungarian National Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 13, 
Dobodura, Mar.-Julv 1944 (Darlington); 
1, Kokoda, 1200 ft.' (366 m), June 1933 
(Cheesman). N-E. N. G.: holotype + 2, 
Stephansort, Astrolabe Bay, 1897 (Biro); 
1, Sattelberg, 1899 (Biro); 1, Finschhafen, 
Huon Pen., 150 m, Apr. 14, 1964 (Sed- 
lacek); 6, Saidor, Gabumi Village, Finis- 
terre Rge., June 24-30, July 1-21, 1958 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Wum, 
Upper Jimmi Vy., 840 m, July 18, 1955 
(Gressitt); 1, Wau, Morobe Dist, 1150 m, 
Nov. 7, 1961 (Sedlaceks); 1, same localitv, 
1450 m, Feb. 5, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, same 
locality, 1700 m, Feb. 19, 1963 (Sedlacek); 
1, Bulolo, "G. Pines," 600 m, Feb. 19, 1962 
(Sedlacek). West N. G.: 1, Hollandia, 
July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington); 1, same lo- 
cality, May 1945 (B. Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 1, 
Ifar, Cyclops Mts., 450-500 m, Sept. 9, 
1962 (Sedlacek); 1, Maffin Bay, July 8, 
1944 (E. S. Ross, California Acad.); 4, 



Rattan Camp, 1150 m, Feb.-Mar. 1939 
( Toxopeus ) . 

Notes. P. astrolahica seems close to but 
probably distinct from jacohsoni Andrewes 
of Sumatra, in which the suture is red 
(usually not red in astrolahica) and the 
microreticulation of pronotum and elytra 
more transverse. Two more, perhaps re- 
lated, apparently undescribed species occur 
in Luzon. 

All specimens seen from New Guinea 
have all usual supraocular and prothoracic 
setae (or punctures marking positions of 
setae) except that the 4 from Rattan Camp 
and the 1 from 1700 m at Wau lack pos- 
terior-lateral prothoracic setae. However, 
presence or absence of these setae is ap- 
parently simple dimorphism, for of 6 speci- 
mens from Cape Gloucester, New Britain 
(Darlington), 5 lack and 1 has posterior- 
lateral setae. Because the distribution of 
individuals with and without posterior- 
lateral prothoracic setae may be of interest 
in the future, I have listed ( above ) all New 
Guinean specimens of the species in detail 
rather than summarizing the species' oc- 
currence. 

Perigona is.s.) subcyanescens Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 732. 
Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 21, p. 172. 
Andrewes 1930, Treul^a, Supplement 7, p. 334. 
Louwerens 1953, Verhandlungen Naturforschenden 

Gesellschaft Basel 64, p. 305. 
horni Jedlicka 1935, Neue Carabiden aus Ostasien, 

Part 10, pp. 18-19 (new synonymy). 

Description. None required here. See 
preceding Key to Sjjccies for identification; 
length ( in New Guinea ) c. 3.3—4.0 mm. 

Types. Of subcyanescens, from Andai, 
near Dorey, West N. G., collected by 
Beccari and D'Albertis, in Genoa Museum. 
Of horni, from Imungan, Luzon, in Jed- 
licka's collection. (See 2nd paragraph of 
following Notes.) 

Occurrence in New Guiiiea. Widely dis- 
tributed and common on the island: 48 
specimens from 13 localities scattered from 
Milne Bay to Sansapor, and including 
Dobodura and Wau (to 1100 m). 



10 BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Notes. Outside New Guinea, this species 
is recorded from West Sumba (Louwerens); 
Borneo; Mindanao, Samar, and Luzon in 
the Philippines; and doul:)tfully from Burn 
(Andrewes); and I have seen specimens 
from New Britain and the Solomons. 

My identification of mbcyanescem is 
based on specimens borrowed from the 
Genoa Museum, one marked as compared 
with Putzeys' type presumably by Csiki, 
and my identification of liorni is based on 
comparison with Philippine "cotypes" in 
the British Museum. 

Perigona is.s.) papuana Csiki 

Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 21, p. 173. 

Description. None required here. See 
Key to Species, and note subparallel cy- 
lindrical form; length 2.6-3.7 mm. 

Types. Lectotype (by present designa- 
tion) and paratvpe from Stephansort, 
Astrolabe Bay, N-E. N. G., 1898 (Biro); 
in Hungarian National Mus. The specimen 
( sex not determined ) now designated lecto- 
type bears the original "Holotypus" label, 
although no holotype was specified. 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. G.: 
4 (in addition to the types), Stephansort, 
1898 (Biro); 1, lower Busu R., Huon Pen. 
May 17, 1955 (E. O. Wilson #1066, M.C.Z.), 
in lowland rain forest; 1, Wau, 1300 m, 
July 27 (year and collector not given). 

Notes. This distinct species seems to be 
confined to a limited area on the north side 
of N-E. New Guinea. 

Perigona is.s.) rossi n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 2, c. as in astrolabica but 
slightly more slender and convex; dark 
castaneous, suture reddish, appendages red- 
dish testaceous; rather shining, reticulate 
microsculpture isodiametric on head, in part 
transverse on pronotum, more transverse 
on elytra. Head 0.70 width prothorax; man- 
dibles pointed and slightly curved but not 
notably elongate; eyes moderate, narrowly 
enclosed behind by genae; antennae monili- 



form; palpi with apical segment much 
longer than subapical, narrowed and almost 
pointed apically; frontal impressions short, 
shallow, diverging posteriorly; 2 setae over 
each eye. Prothorax: width length 1.43; 
base apex 0.90; apex broadly emarginate, 
with angles well defined but not advanced 
beyond arc of emargination; base emargin- 
ate-truncate, with basal angles distinct but 
obtuse, slightly blunted; sides broadly 
rounded, each with usual 2 setae; disc with 
middle line distinct, baso-lateral impressions 
weak. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.25; 
humeri rounded-prominent; apices broadly 
but irregularly rounded to obtuse but well 
defined sutural angles; striae vaguely in- 
dicated; intervals punctulate, 3rd with punc- 
tures at c. Vs and % of length and at apex 
just above submarginal channel. Secondary 
sexual characters: $ unknown; 9 vvith 
several setae each side apex last ventral 
segment. Measurements: length c. 4.5; 
\\'idth 1.7 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (California Acad.) 
from Maffin Bay, West N. G., June 1944 
(E. S. Ross); the type is unique. 

Notes. This species resembles astrolabica 
but differs in details of shape especially of 
prothorax, and in position ( nearer apex ) of 
posterior elytral punctures. 

Perigona is.s.) livens Putzeys 

PutzL-ys 1873, Ann. Mus. Ci\ . (ienoa 4, p. 225. 
Andrewes 1926, Cat. Philippine Caraliidae, p. 354. 
1930, Cat. Indian Insects, Part 18, Ca- 

raliidae, p. 265. 
Tedlicka 1964, Heielienbacliia 2, No. 61, pp. 268, 

270. 

Description (lor recognition onh'). A 
depressed, pale Teri'^ona s.s. with technical 
characters indicated in the preceding Key 
to Species; length (in New Guinea) c. 3.3 
mm. 

Ty])r. DoublfulK from Coromandt>l, 
India; via C^haudoir and then Oberthiir 
Golls. to Paris Nhis. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 2, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. P. liv('i}s is listed b\' Andrewes 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



11 



( 1926 ) from Luzon and Mindanao in the 
Philippines, and Andrewes ( 1930 ) indi- 
cates that he saw Putzeys' type. I have a 
PhiHppine (SE. Bataan) specimen identi- 
fied as livens by comparison with An- 
drewes' collection. The New Guinean speci- 
mens do not match Philippine ones exactly, 
but my material is too limited to justify 
separating the New Guinean form even as 
a subspecies. 

Perigona (s.s.) plagiata Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 734. 
Andrewes 1930, Cat. Indian Insects, Part 18, 

Carabidae, p. 266. 
Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 21, p. 

172. 

1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

5, p. 898 ( see for additional synonymy and 
references ) . 

Jedlicka 1935, Neue Carabiden aus Ostasien, Part 
10, p. 18 (in key). 

1964, Reichenbachia 2, No. 61, pp. 268, 

271. 

Van Emden 1937, Stettiner Ent. Zeituns 98, p. .35. 
annamita Fauvel 1907, Revue d'Ent. 26, p. 104. 
Andrewes 1933, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (10) 11, 
p. 110. 

Description. A small, brownish testaceous 
Perigona s.s. with head and much of elytral 
discs darker brown, and with technical 
characters as indicated in preceding Key 
to Species; length c. 2.2-2.8 mm. 

Types. Of plagiata, from Aru and Kei 
Islands, collected by Beccari, and from 
Andai, West N. G., collected by Beccari 
and D'Albertis; in Genoa Mus. Of an- 
namita, from Ceylon, Annam, Singapore, 
and Andai, West N. G., the specimen(s) 
from New Guinea collected by Raffray; 
Andrewes (1933) found a "type" in the 
Maindron Collection, Paris Mus. Lectotypes 
for both plagiata and annamita should be 
fixed by the next reviser, after examination 
of all the original type material. (Types 
not seen. ) 

Occurrence in Neio Guinea. Common 
and widely distributed. I have seen 145 
specimens from localities scattered over 
most of the length of the island, from 
Dobodura to Sansapor; most at low altitudes 



but single specimens found at 1100 and 
1200 m at Wau. 

Notes. Andrewes (1930) records plagi- 
ata from a wide range, from SE. Asia and 
Japan across the Malay Archipelago to 
the Philippines and New Guinea, and 
Van Emden lists it from the New Hebrides. 
Csiki ( 1924 ) records it from Australia on 
the basis of specimens ( which I have seen ) 
in the Hungarian National Mus., but I think 
this is an error (see Darlington 1964, 
Psyche 71, p. 125). Perigona rufilabris 
(Macleay) of eastern Australia is a similar 
but larger species, 

Perigona {Trechicus) nigriceps (Dejean) 

Dejean 1831, Species General Coleop. 5, p. 44 

(Bcmbidium). 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

5, p. 897 ( see for synonymy and additional 

references ) . 
Jedlicka 1935, Neue Carabiden aus Ostasien, Part 

10, p. 18 (in key). 
1964, Reichenbachia 2, No. 61, pp. 268, 

270, fig. 2. 
Jeannel 1941, Rev. francaise d'Ent. 8, p. 141. 
lititra Perroud and Montrousier 1864, Ann. Soc. 

Linneenne Lyon 11, p. 72 (Trechus) (new 

synonymy ) . 
bcccaiii Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, 

p. 732 (new synonymy). 
J)iwi Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 

21, p. 173 (new synonymy). 
klickai JedHcka 1935, Neue Carabiden aus Ostasien, 

Part 10, pp. 18, 19 (new synonymy). 

Description (for recognition only). See 
preceding Key to Species of Perigona of 
Netv Guinea; color either testaceous with 
head and apices of elytra darker, or brown- 
ish castaneous with suture (and of course 
appendages) pale, or intermediate with 
elytral disc partly but not entirely clouded; 
technical characters include eyes relatively 
large and prominent, front isodiametrically 
microreticulate, and elytra more conspicu- 
ously 3-punctate than usual in the genus, 
with posterior puncture usually almost in 
line with the others; length c. 2.5-3.0 mm. 

Types. Of nigriceps, from North Amer- 
ica, sent to Dejean by Leconte; now in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. Of litiira, from 
Kanala, New Caledonia; location of type(s) 



12 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



unkno\\'n. Of heccarii, from Sarawak, Bor- 
neo, collected by Doria and Beccari; now 
in the Genoa Mus. (a lectotype should be 
designated by next reviser). Of hiroi, I 
now designate as lectot\pe a 9 from Ma- 
dang (Friedrich-Wilh.-hafen), N-E. N. G., 
1896 (Biro, Hungarian National Mus.); 
this specimen is from Csiki's original series 
and is labeled "Holotypus," but the desig- 
nation has not been published until now. 
Of klichai, from Mt. Makiling, Luzon; in 
Andrewes Coll., British Mus. (Types of 
hiroi and klickai onlv seen.) 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. Common and 
widely distributed at low altitudes: more 
than 160 specimens from many localities, 
from Milne Bay to "Dorey" and Biak Is., 
and including Dobodura and Wau ( to 1.300 
m ). 

Notes. P. nigriccps is cosmopolitan, 
carried by man to all tropical and warm 
temperate regions. 

P. lifura, described from New Caledonia 
but supposedly widely distributed in the 
Malay Archi]ielago, was unknown to An- 
drewes. The description fits the dark form 
of niii,riceps, and the fact that the type(s) 
occurred under vegetable detritus also fits 
niiiriceps. (The habitat of niiiriccps is noted 
under the genus. ) P. heccarii is another 
name lor the dark form of this species ( I 
do not consider the dark form worth distin- 
guishing by name), and hiroi and klickai, 
of which I have seen the types, are also 
based on dark examples of ni^riceps. 

Perigona {Trechicus) erimae Csiki 

Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 21, p. 173. 

Description (for recognition only ). With 
characters of Perigona, subgenus Trechicus; 
broad, moderately convex; black or castane- 
ous with suture usually not paler; eyes 
forming c. right angles with neck, but some- 
what variable; front with or without (lighth' 
impressed) isodianietrie reticulations; pro- 
thorax with sides not or slightly sinuate 
postci ioily, with angles well defined but 
obtuse; elytra not or hiintly striate, with 
little or no punctulalion, with subinarginal 



channel moderately broad behind puncture- 
triangle; length c. .3.2-3.6 mm. 

Type. From Erima, Astrolabe Bay, N-E. 
N. G., 1896 (Biro); in Hungarian National 
Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. Thirty-four 
specimens from numerous localities in 
eastern and central New Guinea, from 
Milne Bay and Dobodura to Hollandia and 
Cyclops Mts.; not yet found farther west in 
New Guinea; most from low altitudes but 
reaching 1200 m at Wau. 

Notes. Specimens of this species vary 
considerablv. The eves varv in size and in 
development of genae but usually form 
nearly right angles with the neck. Reticulate 
microsculpture of the head may be distinct 
(but light), or partly obliterated, or c. 
absent. And there is some \ariation of 
other characters. However, the variation 
is not primarily geographic, but occurs at 
single localities. I think, but cannot be 
quite sure, that only one variable species is 
involved. 

Csiki's type of erimae is large, with eyes 
large and genae slight, and with the front 
distinctly reticulate. Proportions of the type 
are head 0.83 width prothorax; prothoracic 
width length 1.50, base/apex 1.03; width 
elytra prothorax 1.53. 

Although erimae is known onl\- from New- 
Guinea, somewhat similar but apparently 
distinct species {andreicesi Jedlicka, arroici 
Jedlicka) occur in the Philippines. 

Perigona (Trechicus) ludovici Csiki 

Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Ilun.uan 21, p. 174. 

Description ( for recognition onl\). Form 
of PcriiiO)\a, subgenus Trechicus; small; 
dark, like dark ni'^riceps but suture not or 
not conspicuously reddish; head with e\'es 
smaller than in niil.rice))s. Iront less dis- 
tinctK' reticulat(> and with rtiieulations 
more trans\'erse espeeialK posteriorly; 
elytra with .3rd (posti'rior) punctures nearer 
sutm(>; length c. 2.7-.3.3 mm. 

T\i])cs. Lectotype (present designation) 
from Mt. llansemann, Astrolabe Bay, N-E. 
N. (;., 1901 (Biro, Tbnigarian National 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



13 



Mus. ), and 8 additional original (co) types, 
2 with same data as lectotype and 6 from 
Madang (Friedrich-Wilh.-hafen), 1900 and 
1901 (Biro) (seen). 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Seventy-five 
specimens from numerous localities over 
almost the whole length of New Guinea 
(Milne Bay and Dobodura to the Vogel- 
kop); at low altitudes, none above 550 m. 

Notes. P. ludovici is compared with 
nigriccps in the preceding Description. P. 
ludovici is in fact closer to erimac but has 
the head narrower, eyes relatively smaller, 
and microreticulation of posterior part of 
head usually more transverse. Also, ludovici 
averages smaller than erimae, although 
measurements of length overlap: ludovici, 
c. 2.7-3.3; erimae, c. 3.2-3.7 mm. (Csiki 
gives 2.5-2.8 mm for ludovici and 3.5 mm 
for erimae. ) Nevertheless, these species are 
very similar and some individuals are dif- 
ficult to place. Proportions of the lectotype 
of ludovici are head 0.76 width prothorax; 
prothoracic width/length 1.49, base/apex 
1.08; width elytra/prothorax 1.59. 

Both erimae and ludovici live among dead 
leaves on the ground in rain forest. 

Perigona (Trechicus) lebioides Csiki 

Csiki 1924, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 21, p. 174. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
of small, very broad, moderately convex 
Perii^ona, subgenus Trechicus; castaneous 
with suture not or only faintly reddish; 
prothorax with sides not strongly sinuate 
and not denticulate posteriorly; elytra with 
submarginal depressed space very narrow 
behind puncture-triangle; elytra faintly or 
irregularly striate, not or not much punc- 
tulate; length 2.8-3.3 mm. 

Types. I now designate as lectotype the 
specimen marked "Holotypus" by Csiki. It 
is from Erima, Astrolabe Bay, N-E. N. G., 
1896 (Biro) in Hungarian National Mus. 
(seen). Seven paratvpes are from Sattel- 
berg, N-E. N. G., 1899 (Biro). (Two addi- 
tional specimens labeled as paratypes of 
lebioides, from Simbang, Huon Gulf, Biro, 



in Plungarian National Museum, are not 
lebioides but erimae. ) 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Sixty-one 
specimens (including 44 from Dobodura) 
from localities in all 3 political divisions of 
New Guinea; most at low altitudes but 1 
from Sibil, Star Rge., at 1260 m ( Leiden 
Mus.). 

Notes. This, like the other small Perigona 
of subgenus Trechicus that occur in New 
Guinea, lives among dead leaves on the 
floor of rain forest. Biro presumably col- 
lected the types by sifting. I took mine 
by throwing raked-up leaves and leaf mold 
into still water, and picking up the beetles 
as they came to the surface. 

Perigona {Trechicus) cordens n. sp. 

Description. With characters of Perigona, 
subgenus Trechicus; form broad, rather 
convex; black or castaneous, suture not or 
not much paler, elytra subiridescent, ap- 
pendages reddish testaceous; reticulate 
microsculpture faint, not clearly visible at 
c. 100 X l)ut apparently isodiametric on 
front, somewhat transverse posteriorly on 
head, fine and strongly transverse on 
pronotum and elytra. Head 0.80 and 0.79 
width prothorax; eyes rather large, forming 
c. right angles with neck, mandibles average 
for genus; antennae with middle segments c. 
IVi X long as wide; front with impressions 
irregular but distinct, margined externally 
by short elevations. Prothorax cordate; 
width length 1.47 and 1.47; base apex 0.98 
and 0.97; sides strongly sinuate about Vs 
from base; posterior angles nearly right but 
blunted; disc with fine middle line, shallow 
poorly defined baso-lateral impressions. 
Elytra short, wide; width elytra prothorax 
1.64 and 1.66; submarginal impressed space 
very narrow^ behind puncture-triangle; each 
elytron with parts of at least 6 striae, inner 
ones moderately impressed and irregular 
or vaguely punctate; intervals not distinctly 
punctulate, 3rd 3-punctate. Secondary sex- 
ual characters normal: c5 front tarsi with 
3 segments (only apex of 1st) narrowly 2- 
seriately squamulose; 6 with 2, 9 c. 4 



14 BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



setae at apex last ventral segment. Mea- 
surements: length c. 3.4; width 1.5-1.6 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,345) and 3 paratypes (broken <^ , 9 $ ) 
all from Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 
( Darlington ) . 

Measured speeimens. The 6 holotype 
and 1 9 paratype. 

Notes. This species occurred in leal 
litter in rain forest, with erimae, ludoviei, 
and lehioides, from all of which cordens is 
immediately distinguishable by its strongly 
cordate prothorax. 

Perigono (Trechicus) denfifer n. sp. 

Description. With characters of Perigona, 
subgenus Trechicus; form as in Figure 3; 
broad, moderately convex; reddish castane- 
ous with suture slightly paler, appendages 
reddish testaceous; shining, not iridescent, 
microsculptme absent or nearly so. Head 
0.78 and 0.78 width prothorax; mandibles 
slender, pointed, weakly arcuate near apex; 
eyes moderately large but less prominent 
than usual, forming obtuse angles with 
neck; antennae with middle segments c. 
Vri X long as wide; front with slight median 
puncture and distinct short anterior frontal 
impressions. Prothorax broadly subcordate, 
very wide anteriorly; width/length 1.40 
and 1.45; base/apex 0.95 and 0.88; sides 
weakly rounded, strongly converging pos- 
teriorly almost to base, then abruptly sinu- 
ate with basal angl(\s right-denticulate; disc 
with usual middle line and transverse im- 
pressions, basal transverse impression sub- 
foveate at middle and running into slightly 
dccjier but poorly defined baso-lateral im- 
pressions. FJijtra wide; width elytra pro- 
thorax r. 1.61 and 1.60 (exact measurement 
impossible because elytra spread in both 
specimens); submarginal impressed space 
very narrow behind puncture-triangle; 6 
abbrc-viated striae on each elytron, inner on(\s 
impressed, all plainU' punctate; int(>r\als 
not punclulate, 3rd 3-puuctate. Secondary 
.sexual characters as in jireceding species 
(cordens). Measuremenl.s: length r. 3.2- 
3.4; width r. 1.4-1.5 mm. 



Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,346) and 1 9 paratype both from Milne 
Bay, Papua, Dec. 194.3 (Darlington). 

Notes. The form of prothorax, absence of 
microsculpture, and impressed punctate 
elytral striae are diagnostic of this species. 

Tribe LiCININI 

Sloane 1898, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
23, pp. 487 ff . ( Australian genera ) . 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 
.5, p. 899. 

Ball 1959, Mem. American Ent. Soc, No. 19, p. 
5 ( see for synonymy and additional references ) . 

Most Licinini, including all those known 
from New Guinea, have the labrum and 
usually also the clypeus deeply emarginate, 
the labrum often so deeply so as to appear 
2-lobed. This alone is almost a sufficient 
recognition character of the tribe, in New 
Guinea. Other diagnostic characters are 
discussed by Ball ( 1959, pp. 5-8). 

Licinines are nearly world-wide in distri- 
bution but are relatively few in Central 
and South America and relatively numerous 
in Australia: about 10 genera, including 
some that are probably primitive or relict, 
occur in Australia. Five genera occur in 
New Guinea: Badister, which is \\idel> 
distributed in other parts of the world; 
Omestes, a monotypic genus confined to the 
eastern part of the Mala\^ Archipelago; 
and Physolaesthus, Dicrochilc. and Micro- 
feronia, which are primarih Australian. 
Thrc^e species of Dicrochile and one of each 
of the other genera are known in N(^w 
Guinea. All the New Guinean species are 
winged, except Microferonia haro. 

The following Key is based on Balks 
(1959, p. 11) key to Oriental licininc^ 
genera. 

Kky to Gfnfha ok Licinini ok Xknv Ciinka 

1. One mandible deeply notched alioxe, with a 

prominent boss beliind tiir iiotrh 2 

Neither mandible notched as described 4 

2. I.cil mandible notched; only basal seginent 

oi antenna glabrous (p. 15) ._. Badister 
- \\\si}\{ mandible notchecb each antciuKi w itii 
3 segments glabrous 3 

3. Smaller (c. 5 mm); elytra not spined (p. 
15) Phtjsolacsthus 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



15 



- Larger (c. 11-15 mm); elytra with short 
apical spines (p. 16) Omcstc.s 

4. Form Agonu)n-\\\.e; mandibles blunt at apex 
(p. 16) — Dicrochile 

- Form elongate-oval with very small head; 
mandibles ( at least the right one ) con- 
spicuously 2-dentate at apex, with upper 
tooth large, acute (p. 18) Miciofeiouia 

Genus BADISTER Clairville 

Anonymous [Clairville] 1806, Entomologie Hel- 

vetique 2, p. 90. 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

5, p. 901 (see for synonymy and additional 

references ) . 
Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part 2, p. 1000. 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 236 (key to 

Indonesian species ) . 
Ball 1959, Mem. American Ent. Soc, No. 16, pp. 

189-191. 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Carabus bipustidatus Fab- 
ricius, of Europe, etc. 

Generic distribution. Temperate and 
tropical Eurasia, the Malay Archipelago, 
and eastern Australia; Africa and Mada- 
gascar; North America and some West 
Indies, but not South America. 

Notes. See Jeannel (1942) and Ball 
( 1959 ) for further information on this 
widely distributed genus. 

Badisfer (Baudia) sundaicus Andrewes 

Andrewes 1926, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) IS, p. 

275. 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 236. 

Description. See Andrewes (1926); length 
c. 4.0-4.5 mm. 

Type. From Soekaboemi, Java; in 
Andrewes Coll., British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 4, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 
N-E. N. G.: 1, Maprik, Sepik Dist., 150 m, 
Dec. 29, 1959-Jan. 17, 1960 (T. C. Maa, 
Bishop Mus.). West N. G.: 2, Hollandia, 
July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. I tentatively identify as sundaicus 
specimens from Siani and the Malay Pen. 
(British Mus.); Sumatra; Java; Luzon and 
Leyte in the Philippines; Morotai Is. in 



the Moluccas; New Guinea (listed above); 
New Britain; and widely scattered locali- 
ties in eastern Australia. Specimens from 
all these places have the mandibular and 
antennal characters indicated in the pre- 
ceding Key to Genera. However, variation 
is obvious, and further study may show 
that more than one species is involved. 

Specimens of this and related species 
that I have collected were usually among 
dead leaves and vegetation on the ground 
in very wet places by standing (not running) 
water. 

Genus PHYSOLAESTHUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1850, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 23, Part 
1, No. 2, p. 411. 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. See Chaudoir (1850), and 
following Notes. 

Type species. P. australis Chaudoir, of 
Australia. 

Generic distribution. Primarily Austra- 
lia; one species described from New 
Zealand; and the following species (if 
correctly assigned) on New Guinea, Java, 
and the Philippines. 

Notes. I have not been able to identify 
australis in the Australian material before 
me. Chaudoir does not describe its antennal 
pubescence but states that the right man- 
dible is tuberculate, and this character is 
always associated with 3 antennal segments 
glabrous, among Australian licinines known 
to me. Whether the following species is 
really a Fhysolaesthus and how this genus 
is related to Badistcr will have to be decided 
by future revisers. 

Fhysolaesthus caviceps (Andrewes) 

Badistcr caviceps Andrewes 1936, Ann. Mag. Nat. 

Hist. (10) 17, p. 312 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 236. 

Description. See Andrewes, and my 
Figure 4; length c. 5 mm. 

Type. A $ from Toeloengagoeng, Java; 
in Andrewes Coll., British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. West N. G.: 
4, all from Wissel Lakes area, as follows: 



16 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



1, Itouda, Kamo Vy., 1500 m, Aug. 12, 
1955 (Gressitt), in light trap; 1, Lake 
Paniai, 1570 m, Aug. 28, 1939 (H. Boschma, 
Leiden Mus.); 2, Enarotadi. LSOO m, Aug. 
1, 1962 (Sedlacek). 

Notes. I have seen specimens with the 
characters of caviceps from Java and 
Luzon as well as New Guinea but am not 
sure whether they represent one species or 
two or more related species. Except for 
the different mandibles and antennae, this 
species is remarkably similar to Badisfcr 
sundaicus (above), and I think the habitats 
of the two species are similar, judging 
from what I have seen of them in the 
Philippines. 

Genus OMESTES Andrewes 

Andrewes 1933, Treubia 14, p. 276. 

Diafinosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. See Andrewes. 

Type species. Omestes torta Andrewes, 
below. 

Generic distribution. Same as that of O. 
torta, below. 

Notes. I suspect that Omestes torta may 
prove to be only a large, specialized 
(spined) Physokiestlius, but I shall leave a 
decision about this to future revisers, 

Omestes torta Andrewes 

Andrewes 1933, Treuljia 14, p. 277. 
Louvverens 195(-), Treul)ia 23, p. 224. 

Description. See Andrewes, and m> 
Figure 5; length 11-14 mm. 

Type. A £ from Sangi Is.; in Andrewes 
Goll., British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Gttinea. Papua: 1, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
Milne Bay, Dec. 1943 (Darlington); 2, 
Kiunga, Fly R., Aug. 14-17, 1957 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Darn Is., Mar. 16- 
31, 1936 (Archbold Expedition, A.M.N.H.); 
1, Woodlark Is. (Murua), Kuhunadau ITill, 
Apr. 16-22, 1957 (W. W. lirandl. Bishop 
Mus.). West N. C;.: 19, Mollandia, Julv- 
Sept. 1944 (Darlington); 1, Maffen, Tor R. 
(mouth), 4 km E. of Hollandia, JuK 2. 
1959 (T. G. Maa, Bishop Mus.), at light; 



1, Bernhard Gamp, 50 m, Apr. 12, 1939 
( Toxopeus ) . 

Notes. Omestes torta is now known from 
New Guinea, the Moluccas ( Ilalmahera 
and Morotai), Celebes, the Sangi and 
Talaud Islands, and the Philippines 
(Leyte). My material is not sufficient to 
show details of geographic variation. The 
insect lives among dead leaves and vege- 
tation on the ground in deep swamps. 

Genus DICROCHILE Guerin 

Guerin 1<S46, Ann. Soc. Ent. France (2) 4, Bnll. 

p. cm. 

Sloane 1923, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
48, pp. 35-36 (key to Australian species). 

Csiki 1931, Colcop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 
p. 921 ( see for synonym\- and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Ty})c species. Presumabh- Dicrochilc 
fabrii Guerin, of New Zealand. (I do not 
wish to designate a type species. If no 
formal designation has been made, it should 
be left to the next reviser. ) 

Generic distribution. New Zealand, Aus- 
tralia, New (Guinea, Moluccas (Obi Is.), 
Solomons ( a probably undescribed species 
near alternans from Bougainville), New 
(Caledonia. 

Notes. All species of this genus that I 
know, in Australia as well as New Ciuinea, 
arc \\'inged. Most of them live in swamps 
or other wet places, but alternans (de- 
scribed below) is a nicsophile. 

Kkv k) Species oi- Dickociiilk ok Xeav Guinea 

1. I']l\tra w'itli atiitc tcctli or sliort spini's at 
sutnral and outer-apical ant^lcs; dorsal elytral 
intcr\als ccjnal or ncarK so (p. 10) acuta 

- Elytra not toothed or spined; dorsal ehtral 
inter\als uncciual _ ._ 2 

2. I'^ront of head normalK' con\e\; smaller, 
length 11.5-12.5 nun (p. 17) altcntans 

— I'roiit ol licad sliyhtK depressed; hir^cr, 
length 13. .5-14. 5 nnn ( [i. IS) tiro 

Dicrochile acuta n. sp. 

Description. Form (Fig. 6) ol ALi,()num- 
likc Dicrochilc; piccous black, lateral mar- 
gins ol proiiotiiin ;iiul elytra slightK trans- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlinfiton 



17 



lucent, elytra iridescent; microsculpture 
fine and isodiametric on front, indis- 
tinct (at 100 X ) but probably strongly 
transverse on pronotum and elytra. Head 
0.74 and 0.72 width prothorax; eyes large; 
front slightly convex, weakly impressed at 
sides anteriorly. Frothorax quadrate-sub- 
cordate; width length 1.35 and 1.39; base/ 
apex 1.13 and 1.09 (base measured across 
posterior-lateral setae); base slightly emar- 
ginate, not margined; apex broadly emar- 
ginate, with impressed marginal line; sides 
rounded except c. straight toward base; 
margins rather broad, moderately explanate, 
each with usual 2 setae ( at base and before 
middle); basal angles very obtuse, almost 
rounded; pronotum with usual impressions, 
impunctate at middle, closely punctate at 
base and sides. Elytra subparallel, slightly 
narrowed toward base; width elytra/pro- 
thorax 1.46 and 1.40; outer-apical and 
sutural angles each with an acute tooth or 
very short spine; striae shallow, faintly 
punctulate; intervals c. flat, subequal on 
disc, 3rd with 2 punctures attached to 2nd 
stria. Legs: middle and hind tarsi broadly 
grooved each side above; 5th segment hind 
tarsi with e. 6 strong setae each side below. 
Secondary sexual charaeters: i front tarsi 
somewhat obliquely dilated, with 3 seg- 
ments squamulose below; 6 with 1, 9 with 
2 setae before apex each side last ventral 
segment. Measurements: length c. 12.5- 
15.5; width c. 5.0-6.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (A.M.N.H.) and 1 9 
paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,347) from 
Lake Daviumbu, Fly R., Papua, Sept. 1-10 
(holotype) and Aug. 19-30 (paratype), 
1936 (Archbold Exp.), evidently taken in 
a light trap; 1 9 paratype (Bishop Mus.), 
Oriomo R., Papua, 6 m, Feb. 13, 1964, 
"H. C", in light trap; 1 9 paratype, "Highl. 
Agr. Exp. Sta./Aiyura, E. Highl./D", N-E. 
N. G., 5600 ft. (c. 1700 m), May 26, 1960 
(J. J. H. Szent-Ivany, Dept. Agr. Port 
Moresby), at light; 1 S paratype (Bishop 
Mus.), Nabire, S. Geelvink Bay, West 
N. G., 10-40 m, Oct. 7, 1962 (H. Holtmann), 
m light trap in jungle. 



Measured specimens. The 6 holotype 
and 9 paratype from Lake Daviumbu. 

Notes. This species is closely comparable 
only with D. gigas Castelnau, of Australia. 
It resembles gigas in most technical char- 
acters including the denticulate-spinose 
elytra, but differs from gigas in being much 
smaller (Australian gigas measure 20 mm 
and over) and in having a relatively nar- 
rower prothorax and less impressed front. 

Louwerens (Treubia 24, 1958, p. 250) 
records D. gigas from Obi Is. in the Moluc- 
cas, on the basis of 2 specimens 18 mm long, 
which differ in some details from the single 
Australian specimen of gigas with which 
they were compared. Whether the Obi Is. 
specimens are gigas or a related species 
remains to be decided, as Louwerens hints. 

Dicrochile alternans n. sp. 

Description. Form (Fig. 7) of rather 
broad Australian Dicrochile (e.g., goryi 
Boisduval); black, appendages blackish ex- 
cept outer segments of antennae brown; 
both sexes moderately shining but not 
iridescent, with reticulate microsculpture 
faint and c. isodiametric ( where detectable) 
on front, vague or irregular but apparently 
transverse on pronotum and elytra. Head 
0.74 and 0.73 width prothorax; eyes mod- 
erate; front convex at middle, irregularly 
longitudinally impressed each side anteri- 
orly. Frothorax slightly transverse, width/ 
length 1.36 and 1.38; base/apex 1.15 and 
1.15; base and apex broadly emarginate, 
apex strongly and base less strongly or in- 
distinctly margined; sides broadly rounded; 
margins broadly flattened and moderately 
reflexed posteriorly, each with usual 2 
setae, at base and before middle; basal 
angles broadly rounded; disc convex, with 
usual impressions, punctate at base, sides, 
and apex, impunctate at middle. Elytra 
elongate-subquadrate; width elytra/pro- 
thorax 1.48 and 1.54; apices sinuate but not 
denticulate; striae deep, punctulate; in- 
tervals convex, unequal on disc (3rd, 5th, 
7th nearly 2x as wide as others at % of 
elytral length), 3rd usually 2-punctate with 



18 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



punctures near or behind ^.-i and 7;5 of 
elytral length, but anterior puncture some- 
times duphcated on one or both elytra. 
Legs: middle and hind tarsi sulcate each 
side above; 5th segments hind tarsi with c. 
6 strong setae each side below. Sccondanj 
sexual characters: 6 front tarsi dilated and 
squamulose as usual in genus; 6 with 
1, $ 2 setae each side last ventral segment. 
Measurements: length c. 11.5-12.5; width 
4.5-5.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,34(S) and 12 paratvpes from Chimbu Vv., 
Bismarck Rge., N-E'. N. G., 5000-7500 ft. 
(c. 1500-2300 m), Oct. 1944 (Darlington); 
1 paratype, Feramin, N-E. N. G., 1200-1500 
m, June 15-18, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus. ); 1 paratvpe, Minj, W. Highlands, 
N-E. N. G., 5200 ft. (c. 1600 m), May 20, 
1960 (J. 11. Barrett, Dept. Agr. Port 
Moresby), by mercury vapor lamp. 

Additional material. Papua: 1 c5 , S. 
Highlands, Aiyuro nr. Mendi, 1530 m, Oct. 
7, "l958 (Gressitt), in light trap. West 
N. G.: 16, Wissel Lakes, Urapura-Itouda, 
Kamo Vy., 1500 m, Aug. 12, 1955 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype 
and 1 9 paratype from Ghimbu Vy. 

Notes. The usually 2-punctate 3rd elytral 
intervals and the deep, punctulate striae 
suggest that this new species is allied to 
the common Australian Dicrochilc goryi 
Boisduval, but the elytral intervals of goryi 
do not alternate in width, and there arc 
other smaller differences. 

I found th(> Ghimbu specimens under 
cover on the ground in fairly open places. 

Dicrochile tiro n. sp. 

Descriptio)\. Similar to the preceding 
(aUerruitis) but larger, with flatter front 
and relatively wider prothorax. Head 0.71 
and 0.69 width prothorax, lormed as in 
alternans except Hatter anteriorly. Vro- 
thorax: width length 1.39 and 1.45; base 
apex 1.16 and 1.16; otherwise as in alternans. 
Elytra: width clytra/prothorax 1.47 and 
1.40; most details including alternation of 
elvtral intervals c. as in (illcr)unis: 3rd in- 



terval 2- to 4-punctate, the number of punc- 
tures often different on the 2 elytra of 1 
individual (actual punctures on the left 
and right elytra of 6 individuals are 2-3, 
2-2, 4-2, 2-2, 2-2, 2-3). Measurements: 
length 13.5-14.5; width 5.5-6.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (Leiden Mus.) and 
7 paratypes (some in M.G.Z., Type No. 
31,349) all from Wissel Lakes, West N. G., 
as follows: holotype and 4 paratypes. Lake 
Paniai, 1750 m, and 1 paratype, Arabu 
Camp, ISOO m, various dates in Sept., Oct., 
Nov. 1939 (H. Boschma, Leiden Mus.); 2 
paratypes, Enarotadi, 1800-1900 m, July 31, 
Aug. 9, 1962 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. One 6 paratype 
from Lake Paniai and the 9 holotype, in 
this order. 

Notes. Sufficiently compared with al- 
ternans in the preceding Description and in 
the Key to S})ecies of Dicrochile of New 
Guinea. Whether tiro is a separate species 
or a local form of alternans is uncertain. 
The matter is complicated by the occur- 
rence of a specimen of alternans in the 
Wissel Lakes area. 

Genus MICROFERONIA Blackburn 

Blackburn 1(S90, Proc. l-iiuicaii Sor. New Sdutli 

Wales (2) 4, p. 738. 
Sloane 1898, Proc. Linncaii Soc. Xcw South Wales 

23, pp. 490-491 (Australian species). 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Caiabidae, Harpalinae 

5, p. 920 (see lor additional rcferenc(^s ). 
Ck'nyccnis Andrewes 1933, Trenliia 14. \i. 277 

( new s\non\ luy). 

Diagnosis. See Key to (Uiura of Licinini. 

Description. None re(inirc'd here; see 
Notes, below. 

Ty})e s))ccies. Oi M icrofcronicL M. adc- 
laidae Blackburn, Australia; of Genycerus, 
Cx. hicanoides Andrewes, of Ja\a. 

Generic distribution. Aii.«^tralia, N<mv 
(Fiiiiioa. Ja>a. and presumably inlciAcniiig 
islands. 

Notes. W'lu'n Anchx'wcs described Gouj- 
cerus, he thought the mandiblc\s uniciue 
among Licinini, but he was not lamiliar 
with the Australian members ol the tribe. 1 
l)a\(' seen the t\ pe ol (U'nyccnis lucanoidcs 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



19 



and have a photograph of it, and it seems 
to me that the mandibles are eomparable 
to those of Microfcronia. The diseovery of 
another comparable species in New Guinea 
links the Australian and Javan forms geo- 
graphically. I therefore tentatively suggest 
the synonymy cited above. 

Microferonia baro n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 8, elon- 
gate-oval with very small head; brownish 
piceous, legs and antennae slightly reddish; 
moderately shining, reticulate microsculp- 
ture c. isodiametric on front, transverse on 
pronotum, more transverse on elytra. Head 
0.51 width prothorax; eyes large, genae 
short; 2 setae over each eye; antennae with 
3 basal segments glabrous; right mandible 
2-dentate, with inner tooth strong and 
acute ( left mandible probably c. similar but 
partly hidden ) ; front almost evenly convex 
except with slight frontal impressions an- 
teriorly; clypeus subtruncate, with narrow 
transverse membrane; labrum emarginate to 
c. middle of length, with lobes equal; 
mentum without tooth; ligula and paraglos- 
sae apparently subequal, ligula apparently 
2-setose; palpi slender except apical seg- 
ments of both pairs slightly thickened. 
Prothorax: width/length 1.40; base/apex 
1.70; base truncate-emarginate, vaguely mar- 
gined at middle; apex broadly emarginate, 
with marginal line entire; sides rounded 
anteriorly, nearly straight toward base, nar- 
rowly margined, each with 2 setae, at base 
and before middle; disc broadly convex 
except depressed baso-laterally, impunctate, 
with middle line distinct but transverse im- 
pressions c. obsolete. Elytra long-oval; 
width elytra prothorax c. 1.30; margins 
entire at base, bluntly (almost rectangularly) 
angulate at humeri, not distinctly sinuate 
toward apex; sutural angles narrowly 
rounded; striae fine, irregular but scarcely 
punctulate; intervals nearly flat, somewhat 
irregular but scarcely alternating; each 3rd 
interval with a conspicuous seta-bearing 
puncture about % from base, a less con- 
spicuous puncture without seta near or be- 



hind middle, apparently no more-posterior 
puncture. Inner icin(j,s evidently atrophied. 
Loner surface almost impunctate but ex- 
tensively alutaceous, not pubescent; met- 
episterna less than Vj longer than wide. 
Legs: tarsi slender, not sulcate above; 5th 
segments hind tarsi with 5 long setae each 
side below. Secondary sexual characters: 
$ with 3 segments each front tarsus mod- 
erately dilated, squamulose below; i with 
1 seta each side last ventral segment; i 
copulatory organs as in Figure 170; ? un- 
known. Measurements: length c. 8; width 
3.4 mm. 

Type. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,350) from Mt. Wilhelm, Bismarck Rge., 
N-E. N. G., 7000-10,000 ft. (2135-3050 m), 
Oct. 1944 ( Darlington ) ; the type is unique. 
It was taken on the ground under cover 
in mountain rain forest. 

Notes. Microferonia baro is more oval 
and smaller-headed than M. (Genycerus) 
lucanoides (Andrewes) of Java. I do not 
have a specimen of lucanoides, and I do 
not want to dissect the mouth parts of the 
single type of haro (which should be re- 
served for specialists in Licinini), but so 
far as I can determine the two species are 
similar in generic characters although dif- 
ferent in detail. ^L baro is larger, more 
oval, and smaller-headed than anv Aus- 
tralian Microferonia known to me. 

(Tribe AMBLYSTOMINI) 

(Genus AMBLYSTOMUS Erichson) 

Erichson 1837, Kiifer Mark Brandenburg 1, 1, p. 
59. 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 
p. 922 ( see for synonymy and additional ref- 
erences ) . 

Andrewes 1939, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (11) 3, p. 
130. 

Diagnosis. Small Carabidae with most 
technical characters of large-headed Har- 
palini but with labrum usually unsymmetri- 
cally emarginate and scutellar striae in first 
(not second) intervals; length usually less 
than 5 mm. 

Description. None required here. 



20 BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Type species. Acupalpus mauritaniciis 
Dejean, of the Mediterranean region (An- 
drewesl939). 

Generic distribution. Most of the wanner 
parts of the Old World, inckiding Aus- 
tralia but perhaps not New Guinea. 

Notes. In the British Museum are 14 
specimens labeled as from Dor(e)y, New 
Guinea, some marked as collected by Wal- 
lace and all probably from his material. 
They include 4-macuIate, 2-maculate and 
immaculate individuals, probabh represent- 
ing different species. However, these speci- 
mens may be mislabeled and may really be 
from Celebes or the Moluccas (see Part I 
of my "Carabid Beetles of New Guinea," 
p. 331 ). I have received no other specimens 
from New Guinea and found none there 
myself, although I collected series of the 
genus in the Philippines, so that my collect- 
ing methods are evidently adequate to ob- 
tain it, and Amhhjstomus is usually common 
where it occurs at all. I therefore doubt 
its occurrence in New Guinea. I list the 
genus here, in parentheses, but see no rea- 
son to name or discuss the "Dor(e)y" 
species individually. 

Tribe CHLAENIINI 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 
5, \). 927 (see for earlier references and 
synoinmy ). 

Callistitac Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. 
Carabiques, Part 2, p. 961. 

Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carabifjues de la Rei^ion 
Malgache, Part 3, p. 776. 

Calllstinae Basilewsky 1953, Exploration Pare Na- 
tional I'Upemba, Fasc. 10, Carabitlae. p. 119. 

A single, well known genus of this tribe 
is represented in New (Guinea. 

Genus CHLAENIUS Bonelli 

iioiiclii bSlO, Observations Eiit. 1, Tab. Syiiopt.. 

Mem. .Acad. Sci. Tnrin 18, pp. 21-7(S. 
Chaudoir 1876, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 8, p. 10 

(in m()n()L,'rai)li of "Chleniens"). 
Sloane 1910, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South \\ ales 

35, p. 437 (Anstralian species). 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Haipalinae 5, 

p. 934 (see for additional references). 
Andrewes 1941, Ann. Maji. Nat. Hist. (11) 7, p. 

307 (with key to Javan species), 
jeannel 1942; 1949 (see works cited nnder tribe). 



Bell 1960, Misc. Pub. Ent. Soc. America 1, pp. 
98, 108 (North American species). 

Diasi,nosis. See works cited. I use 
Chlaenius in a xery broad sense, as noted 
below. In this sense it is the only genus of 
the tribe in New Guinea and Australia. 

Description. None required here. For 
discussion of some characters of the New 
Guinean species, see Notes below. 

Tyj)c species. Chlaenius nmrii,inatus Rossi 
{= vclutinus Duftschmidt), of Em-ope. 

Generic distribution. Nearly world-wide. 
Tlie genus is most diverse in structure and 
most numerous in species in Africa and the 
Oriental Region, less diverse and less nu- 
merous in Eurasia and America north of the 
tropics, and still less in South America and 
the Australian Region. This suggests that 
the genus has evolved primarily in the 
Old World tropics and spread from there. 

In the Asiatic-Australian area, scores of 
species of CJda-cnius are known in tropical 
Asia, about 30 in Java (Andrewes 1941), 
but only 12 in New Guinea, and only 10 
(including Ilololeius) in Australia. Some of 
the species in New Guinea and Australia 
are undifferentiated Asiatic forms. Others 
are endemic to New Guinea or Australia. 
And the endemics difft^r in degree of dis- 
tinctness. This suggests continual trickling 
of species from Asia toward New Guinea 
and Australia rather than concerted move- 
ments. The fact that all Chlaenius in New 
Guinea and Australia are still winged sug- 
gests that their dispersals haxc been rela- 
tively recent. 

Notes. Vov discussion ol the authoi-, date j 
of publication, and type species of Chhicnius !| 
see Jeannel 1942, page 963, footnote. 

Chlaenius is a huge genus of 700 or SOO 
or more known species, and the species are 
diverse and can be di\ided into man\- well 
characterized groups. Ne\-ertheless, the 
genus as a whole seems natural, not poK- 
phyletic. Under these circumstances, al- 
though the genus can and should be 
subdivided, the taxononiie lexcl of tlu- sub- 
dixisions should be detcMinined b\- utilit)' 
and intelligibilit) . Chlaenius is known to 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 21 



many entomologists who are not specialists species. Segment 3 is not strictly glabrous 

in Carabidae, and there seems much to lose in any species; a few minute setules are 

and little to gain by splitting it into small aWays visible in fresh, clean specimens at 

genera with new and unfamiliar generic 50x or lOOx magnification. 

names, many of them unfamiliar even to The palpi (lioth pairs, in both sexes) are 

me, a specialist in Carabidae! I shall there- usually slender with apices narrowly trun- 

fore use ChJacnius in a very broad sense, cate, but are almost acuminate in guttula, 

as a matter of considered policy. I expect and more broadly truncate in flaviguttatus 

to discuss this policy in more detail in Part (tenninal segments with apical edges Vs or 

IV of my "Carabid Beetles of New Guinea." % segments' length ) . 

The ChJocniiis of New Guinea are few and The mentum is toothed, and the tooth is 

some of them do not fit well in recognized usually variably emarginate. 

subgenera, and no one is likely to be misled The pronotum has a basal hair fringe in 

if I treat them simply as species of the all species except daer, ceylanicus, and 

great genus Chloenius sensu Into. guttula, which lack it. These 3 species are 

Almost every author who has worked apparently not related to each other, 

extensively on C/?/rtcn/n.5 has used new char- The pronotum always has a pair of pos- 

acters to group the species, but the works terior-lateral and in some cases also median- 

of different authors have not been well cor- lateral seta-bearing punctures, but they are 

related. Chaudoir used a variety of obvious often hard to distinguish in the general 

characters, beginning with extent of ab- punctation. The posterior-lateral punctures 

dominal punctation. Sloane noted that are Vo or Ve of the prothoracic length before 

presence or absence of a basal pronotal the base in Chlaenius pan, daer, and guttula, 

hair fringe and presence or absence of inter- but closer to or at the posterior angles in 

ruptions of the outer elytral margins are the other species. Median-lateral punctures 

promising taxonomic characters within the (just before middle of prothoracic length) 

genus. Jeannel and Basilewsky derived new are present in some (all?) individuals of 

group characters from the male genitalia, occidtiis and siccus, but apparently absent 

And Bell found additional characters in the in the other species. 

labial pit organs of both sexes and in the The elytra have the basal margin entire 

chaetotaxy of the valvulae of the female, except in Chlaenius pan. The margin is 

The following notes on certain characters obtusely angulate at humeri in daer, 

apply only to the New Guinean species of rounded or at most vaguely subangulate in 

Chlaenius, unless otherwise indicated. the other species. 

Tlie mandibles are short in all Chlaenius The outer elytral margins are interrupted 

in New Guinea, and are exceptionally before apex except in Chlaenius pan and 

strongly semicircularly arcuate in maculiger. daer, in which the interruption is obsolete. 

The clypeus and labrum are truncate or The punctation of the elytral intervals 

weakly emarginate except in amplipcnnis, is 2-seriate in Chlaenius pan and daer, but 

in which the labrum is deeply emarginate. irregular in the other species, in which it 

The antennae have segment 3 much (c. varies from sparse {ceylanicus only) to 

V2) longer than segment 4 in Chlaenius pan dense. 

and daer, slightly longer in guttula and The inner wings are full and probably fit 

amplipennis, and subequal in the other for flight in all Chlaenius in New Guinea 

species. Segment 3 is pubescent in guttula and also in Australia, although wang atrophy 

(although the pubescence differs in quality has occurred in various African, Asiatic, 

from that on the outer segments), more and North American stocks of the genus, 

sparsely pubescent or setulose in pan and The punctation of the lower surface of 

daer, and still more sparsely so in the other the body is more diverse than some authors 



22 BiiUetin Museum of Coinparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



have realized. Almost the whole lower 
surface including the abdomen is punctate 
or punctulate and setulose in CJilaenitis 
guttula and amplipennis and also in dacr, 
although the latter belongs to the circiiin- 
datiis group in which Andrewes (1941) 
considered the middle of the abdomen 
glabrous. C. pan, ceylanicus, and muculiiicr 
are more or less intermediate in this char- 
acter. The other species have the middle 
of the abdomen widely glabrous. 

The metepisterna are differently mar- 
gined in different Chlocnhis in New Guinea, 
but I doubt if this character deserves the 
importance Andrewes (1941) gives it. 

The tarsi are obviously setulose above 
in CJihicnius U,uttula, glabrous or nearly so 
in the other species, but minute setules are 
usually visible on the upper surface of the 
tarsi at 50 X or l(X)x magnification, even in 
the "glabrous" species. 

The hind tarsi have the 5th segments 
always with 2 rows of strong setae below. 
The number of setae in each row varies 
from about 4 to about 8 in different species. 

Males of all New Guinean species of 
CJihicnius have each front tarsus with 3 
segments dilated (least so in ccylaniciis, 
see following Key ) and densely squamulose 
below. And i 6 have 1, 9 9 2 setae each 
side before apex of last ventral segment, 
with extra adventitious setae som(>times 
present. 

The aedeagus is open above for much 
ol its length in most species (especially 
widely open in iiuttiila) but relatively long 
and closed lor almost half its length in pcni. 

I have not studied the chaetotaxy of the 
9 valvulae. 

Six unrelated species of CJihicnius, de- 
rived from groups that normally have pale 
markings on the elytra, are losing or have 
lost the markings in New Guinea (see Notes 
under (hier, guttula, flaviguttafus, himac- 
uhiius jiongraczi, maculiger, and iunnifer 
malclicri). This suggests a local climatic 
or other selective factor favoring dark color 
and loss of markings in New Guinea. 



In habits, all New Guinean Chhienius 
are ground-living. C. daer, ceylanicus, 
himaculatus pongraczi, and occultus are 
found on river banks; occultus especially 
may occur only beside rivers. C. hamifer 
malclicri and siccus are commonly found 
under cover in comparatively dry places. 
C. maculiger is, I think, a rain forest species. 
The other species live in more or less damp 
places, but I cannot give their habitats 
exactly. I took specimens of several species 
at light or in floods. 

Key to Species of Chlaenius of New Guinea 

1. Elytra with outer margins not interrupted; 
elytra! intervals each with 1 re^iular row 
of punctures on each side; antennae with 
3rd segments c. ^-j longer than 4th 2 

- Elytra with outer margins interrupted be- 
fore apex; elytral intervals irregularly punc- 
tate; antennae witli 3rd segments not or 
not much longer than 4th 3 

2. Very large (c. 25 nun); pronotmn with 
basal hair fringe (p. 23) )Hin 

- Smaller (c. 12-15 mm); pronotum without 
basal hair fringe (p. 24 ) .— dacr 

3. Elytral intervals very sparsely punctulate; 

c^ front tarsi narrower, with 2nd segments 

V-t or V-i longer tlian wide (p. 24) 

ceylanicus 

- Elytral intervals more closely pimctulate; 
S front tarsi wider, 2nd segment c. wide 

as long - 4 

4. Mandibles very short, semicircularly arcuate 
(p. 25) macidi^cr 

- Mandibles normal, moderately arcuate ^^^ 5 

5. Abdomen plainK' punctulate and pubescent 

or setulose at nu'ddlc as well as at sides 6 

- Abdomen broadh' smooth and glaliious 
(or nearly so) at middle 7 

6. Labrum subtruncate or weakly emarginate; 
pronotum without basal liair iringe; pos- 
teiior-lat(Mal selae c. la of i^rothoracic 
length before base; size very small ( c. 

8 mm) (p. 25) •guttula 

- Labniiii deeply emarginate; pronotum with 
basal hair Iringe; posterior-lateral setae 
near ( slighlK rounded ) posterior angk'S; 
larger ( r. 12 nmi ) {p. 26) --- (iiniiliiunnis 

7. Male bout leniora each with a small tooth- 
like tub('rel<' Ix'low, near base; 5th seg- 
mcnls liiiul tarsi with c. 7 or cS setae each 
side below S 

- Male front b^nora without tubercles; 5th 
segments hind taisi with r. 5 setae each 
side below 10 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 23 



8. Pionotum closely and coarsely punctate 
and head including front punctulate ( this 
combination of characters separates both 
sexes of this species from all following 
ones, the closest approach being siccus, 
see couplet 10) (p. 26) flaviguttatus 

— Pronotum with only base coarsely punctate; 
head not or only sparsely irregularly 
punctulate 9 

9. Pronotum with anterior margin entire or 
only narrowly interrupted at middle; sides 
of prothorax usually sinuate; elytra usually 
2-niaculate ( p. 27 ) -.- hiimiculatus pongraczi 

— Pronotum with anterior margin obsolete, 
indicated only toward sides; sides of pro- 
thorax not sinuate; elytra not maculate 

( p. 27 ) olthofi 

10. Pronotum punctate at base and in narrow 
zone along midline but much of disc im- 
punctate; posterior-lateral pronotal setae 
often c. 1/4(1 of pronotal length before angles 
(but variable) (p. 28) occultus 

- Pronotum more extensively ( but not always 
evenly) punctate; posterior-lateral pronotal 
setae almost at basal angles 11 

11. Pronotum more sparsely punctate near mid- 
dle, with punctiues tending to form ir- 
regular longitudinal rows; front exten- 
sively but irregularly punctate (p. 28) _^_- 
Jimnifcr malcheri 

- Pronotum coarsely pimctate, with punc- 
tm^es somewhat irregular but less so than in 
preceding species; front shining, widely 
impunctate ( a few punctines posteriorly 
and laterally); (this species characterized 
also by coarse punctation of proepisterna 
and of elytral striae) (p. 29) siccus 

Chlaenius pan n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 9, large, 
rather slender; black, appendages brownish 
piceoiis except c. outer halves of femora 
reddish testaceous; rather shining; reticulate 
microsculpture fine, faint on front, slightly 
more distinct on pronotum and elytra, c. 
isodiametric except slightly transverse on 
part of pronotum. Head 0.81 and 0.84 width 
prothorax; eyes rather abruptly prominent; 
antennae with 3rd segments about V.> 
longer than 4th segments and plainly but 
sparsely setulose; mandibles short, mod- 
erately arcuate; mentum with deeply emar- 
ginate tooth; clypeus subtruncate; labrum 
slightly emarginate; palpi narrowly truncate 
at apex in both sexes. Fvothorax quadrate; 
width/length 1.11 and 1.09; base/apex 1.16 



and 1.11; sides weakly arcuate anteriorly, 
slightly converging and very broadly weakly 
sinuate posteriorly, each with seta c. Vt> of 
length before base, without median-lateral 
seta; disc with impressed middle line and 
rounded basal impressions, wrinkled-punc- 
tate at base, nearly smooth (sparsely punc- 
tulate) elsewhere; posterior pronotal hair 
fringe present. Elytra long, narrowed to- 
ward base; width elytra/prothorax 1.67 and 
1.75; margins c. obliterated at base (inside 
bases of 4th striae), rounded at humeri, not 
interrupted posteriorly; intervals rounded- 
subcostate, each with an irregular row of 
punctures on each side. Lower surface 
partly irregularly punctulate, but much of 
abdomen smooth at middle; metepisterna 
long, with outer edges raised but not 
channeled. Inner wings full. Legs slender; 
tarsi not pubescent above; 5th segments 
hind tarsi with 4 or 5 strong setae each side 
below. Secondary sexual characters normal; 
2nd segments S front tarsi c. wide as long 
(by measurement); d front femur not 
dentate; aedeagus long, slender, closed 
above for nearly half its length (Fig. 171). 
Measurements: length c. 25-26; width c. 
9.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus. ) from 
Torricelli Mts., Mokai Village, N-E. N. G., 
750 m, Jan. 1-23, 1959 (W. W. Brandt); 
and paratypes as follows. N-E. N. G.: 1 
$ , Maprik, Sepik Dist., 19^5 ( Dept. Agr. 
Port Moresby). West N. G.: 1 9 (M.C.Z., 
Type No. 31,351), Kota Nika, Res. Hol- 
landia, Jan. 9, 1958 (R. T. Simon Thomas); 
1 9 , Tanahmerah, Res. Boven Digoel, Feb. 
1958 (R.T.Simon Thomas). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
9 paratype from Kota Nika. 

Notes. This new species probably repre- 
sents Chlaenius femoratus Dejean of Java, 
Sumatra, etc. but is narrower (especially 
the jjrothorax) and duller than femoratus 
and lacks subapical interruptions of the 
elytral margins, which are present though 
weak in my 5 specimens of femoratus from 
Java. I have 1 9 of a related undescribed 
s^Decies from Celebes, which partly fills the 



24 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoologij, Vol. 137, No. 1 



geographic gap between femoratus and 
pan. 

Chloenius doer n. sp. 

Description. Form of Chlacnius of cir- 
cumdatus group; slender; greenish l)lack, 
head green, elytra sometimes with vestige 
of very narrow yellowish margin at apex, 
appendages testaceous brown; reticulate 
microsculpture alisent or faint on head and 
pronotum, deep, fine, isodiametric on 
elytra. Head 0.82 and 0.(S2 width prothorax; 
eyes large, prominent; antennae with 3rd 
segments c. ^2 longer than 4th, setulose; 
mandibles moderate; clypeus and labrum 
subtruncate; surface of head irregularly, not 
densely punctate; mentum with ± emargi- 
nate tooth. Prothorax narrow, quadrate-sub- 
cordate; width length 1.11 and 1.16; base/ 
apex 1.04 and 1.09; sides arcuate except 
broadly usually strongly sinuate posteriorly; 
margins narrow, each with seta c. % of 
length before base, without median-lateral 
seta; disc irregularly punctate, with fine 
middle line, linear baso-lateral impressions 
nearer sides than middle but shallower than 
usual in the group; posterior pronotal hair 
fringe absent. Elytra slightly narrowed an- 
teriorly; width elytra/prothorax 1.63 and 
1.66; margins entire at base, obtusely angu- 
late at humeri, not interrupted pcxsteriorly; 
intervals weakly convex, each with a row of 
punctures on each side. Lower surface in- 
cluding middle of abdomen extensively 
punctulate and pubescent; metepisterna 
long, w(>akly margined externally. Inner 
winii-s full. Lcii^s: tarsi nearly glabrous 
above; 5th segments hind tarsi with c. 
4 short setae each side below. Secondary 
sexual characters normal: 2nd segment male 
front tarsi c. Vio longer than wide; male 
femora not dentate; aedeagus open abov(> 
for much of length. Measuremenls: length 
c. 12-15.5; width 4.4-6.0 mm. 

Types. Holot>T)e i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,352) and 2 paratypes from Nad/ab, N-E. 
N. G., July 1944 (Darlington); and addi- 
tional paratypes as follows. Papua: 1<S, 
Kiunga, Fly U., dates in July, Aug. 1957 



(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Lake 
Da\iumbu, Fly R., Aug. 19-30, 1936 
(Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.); 1, Palmer R. 
at Black R., July 22-31, 1936 (Archbold 
Exp., A.M.N.H.); 1, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 
m), Aug. 1933 (Cheesman). N-E. N. G.: 2, 
Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 1, Main R., 
Sepik, Feb. 1965 (R. Hornabrook). West 
N. G.: 1, Hollandia, July-Sept. 1944 
(Darlington); 1, Tanahmerah, Boven Di- 
goel Res., 17 m, April 15, 1955 (L. D. 
Brongersma, Leiden Mus.); 1, Idenburg R., 
400 m, July 15-Sept. 15, 193S (J. Olthof, 
Leiden Mus.); 1, lebele Camp, Snow Mts., 
2250 m, Sept. 1938 (Toxopeus). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Kiunga. 

Notes. C. daer is the only species of the 
Chlaenius circumdatus group in New 
Guinea. This group is widely distributed 
and common in the warmer part of the Old 
World including Australia. The present 
new species seems nearest acroxanthus 
Chaudoir (which ranges from the south- 
eastern corner of Asia to the Moluccas — 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 223) but 
has baso-lateral pronotal impressions shal- 
lower and punctation less coarse. I have 
used for comparison a series of acroxantJuis 
from Java, collected by Thomas Barbour. 

Chlaenius ceylanicus Nietner 

Nietner 1856, j. Asiatic Soc. Bengal 25, p. 385. 

Csiki 1931, Cok'op. Cat., Carabidat', ilarpalinae 
5, p. 932 (HoloUns) (.see for additional refer- 
ences ). 

niliditlus Dejean (not Sehraiik) 182(i, Species 
General Coleop. 2, p. 34 1 . 

onuitus Tryon 1890, Second Annual Report 
Adnn'nistrator British New (Guinea, Appendix 5, 
p. 109 (Poecilus). 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. ("at., Carahidae, Ilarpalinae 5, 
p. 563 (?Focciloi(lca). 

Descri])lion. None recjuired here; see 
preceding Key to Sj)ccies for recognition 
characters. Note 2nd segments 6 front tarsi 
'1 (Ja\;ui specimen) or ':i (Australian speci- 
men) longer than wide (l)y measurement); 
length c. 11-12.5 mm. 

Types. Of ceylanicus. from w(\stern and 
southern Cevloii; now in I^erlin U. Zool. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 25 



Mus. and Stettin Town Mus. (t. Andrewes). 
Of nitidulus, from "Indes orientales"; in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. Of omofus. a 
6 from St. Joseph (Angabimga) R. District, 
Papua, collected by A. C. English; present 
location of type unknown (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. Papua: the 
type of ornafus; 1, Rouku, Morehead R., 
Apr. 1962 (W. W. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). 
N-E. N. G.: 5, Kamindibit, Main R., Sepik, 
Feb. 1965 (R. Hornabrook), on water 
weeds in swamp. West N. G. : 1 9 , 
Garian, Lake Jamoer, Dec. 8, 1954 (L. D. 
Brongersma, Leiden Mus.). 

Notes. ''Hololius" ceyJonicus ranges from 
southern Asia to eastern Australia, and 
will probably be found on all the inter- 
vening islands, although records are still 
incomplete. I have found it in Australia 
under cover by backwaters of rivers and in 
river floods. Nietner says it flies to light 
in Ceylon. 

Chlaenius maculiger Casteinau 

Castelnau 1867, Notes on Australian Colcop., p. 62. 

Chandoir 1876, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 8, p. 67. 

Sloane 1910, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
35, pp. 438, 440. 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Caraliidae, Harpalinae 
5, p. 961. 

nigripes Macleay (not Dejean, not Faldermann ) 
1886, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
(2) l,p. 140. 

biroi Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Har- 
palinae 5, p. 948. 

Description (for recognition only). Me- 
dium sized, depressed; dark, dark-legged, 
typically 2-maculate but spots sometimes 
lost; unique in genus in New Guinea in 
mandibles very short, semicircular; length c. 
12-14 mm. 

Types. Of maculiger, from Rockhamp- 
ton, Australia; probably in Genoa Mus. ( I 
did not find it at Melbourne in 1957). Of 
nigripes, from Fly R., Papua (implied); 
may now be in Macleay Mus., Sydney (not 
seen). Of hiroi, as for nigripes (the name 
hiroi was proposed to replace nigripes 
Macleay, which is preoccupied). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Widely dis- 
tributed and common: 127 specimens from 



localities including Dobodura and Wau 
in all 3 political divisions of New Guinea; 
most at low altitudes but reaching at least 
1300 and 1500 m at Wau and on the 
Bismarck Rge. 

Notes. Sloane (1910) has established the 
identity of nigripes Macleay (hiroi Csiki) 
with maculiger Castelnau. 

Outside New Guinea, this species is 
known from Australia and New Britain 
(Cape Gloucester, Jan.-Feb. 1944, Darling- 
ton). It is apparently related to and 
probably derived from the same Oriental 
stock as Chlaenius tetragonoderus Chaudoir, 
which is widely distributed farther west in 
the Malay Archipelago, to the mainland 
of Asia. C. tetragonoderus batjanicus 
Louwerens (1956, Treubia 23, p. 234) of 
the northern Moluccas, which varies in 
color of legs, may be a transitional form. 
An apparently undescribed species of the 
group occurs in the Solomons. 

The yellow subapical elytral spots are 
individually variable in specimens from 
New Guinea and are absent or nearly 
absent in some individuals. The variation 
in spotting apparently occurs throughout 
New Guinea. 

This is, I think, a rain forest species that 
may occur in ordinary leaf litter rather 
than in specially wet places, but I have 
taken too few specimens to be sure. 

Chlaenius gutfula Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1856, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 29, Part 

2, p. 216. 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

5, p. 957 ( see for additional references ) . 
Andrewes 1941, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (11) 7, p. 

310 (in key). 
Louwerens 1953, Verhandlungen Naturforschenden 

Gesellschaft Basel 64, p. 313. 
csikii Jedlicka 1951, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 

1, p. 136 (new synonymy). 
astrolabe nsis Jedlicka 1951, Ann. Mus. National 

Hungary 1, p. 136 (new synonymy). 
immaculata Louwerens 1962, Tijdschrift voor Ent. 

105, p. 145 (new synonymy). 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Very 
small; dull dark bluish, with or without a 
small pale spot on suture near apex (see 



26 



BuUctin Museum of Comparaiive Zoolop^ij, Vol. 137, No. 1 



following Notes); see also preceding Key 
to Species; length c. 8 mm. 

Types. Of gtittiila, from Hongkong; in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. Of r.s//\// and 
astrolahensis, both from Stephansort, Astro- 
labe Bay, N-E. N. G.; in Hungarian 
National Mus. Of immacuJata, from Ani- 
hoina; in Louwerens Coll. (Types not 
seen. ) 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 7, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
1, Bisianumu, near Sogeri, 500 m. Mar. 15- 
20, 1955 (E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.), in rain 
forest; 1, Brown R., May 23, 1956 (E. J. 
Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 1, 
Bulolo, 731 m, Aug. 26, 1956 (E. J. Ford, 
Jr., Bishop Mus.); 1, Finschhafen (L. 
Wagner, M.C.Z.). West N. G.: 3, Hol- 
landia, Jan., Apr., Mav 1945 (B. Malkin, 
U.S.N.M.); 1, Kota Nika, Res. Hollandia, 
Nov. 29, 1957 (R. T. Simon Thomas, 
Louwerens Coll.); 1, Maffin Bay, Jan. 1, 
1945 (E. S. Ross, California Acad.). 

Notes. This species is known from south- 
ern Asia, Sumatra, Java, Bali, Celebes, 
Timor (Louwerens 1953), the Philippines, 
New Guinea, and New Britain (Cape 
Gloucester, Darlington, M.C.Z. ). It often 
flies to light. 

Although most specimens from New 
Guinea have a variable ( sometimes minute ) 
vestige of a subapical sutural pale spot, 
several ( not all ) of those from Dobodura 
are unspotted. 

The characters given by Jedlicka to dis- 
tinguish csikii from iiuttuJa seem to me to 
be individual rather than spcx'ific, and 
"aberration" astrolalmnsis Jedlicka and "var." 
inimaculata Louwerens are (I think) un- 
necessary names lor imspotted individuals. 

Chlaenius amplipennis Chaudoir 

Cliaiuloii 1876, Ann. Mus. Civ. Ocnoa 8, p. 252. 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidac, Ilarpalinac 

5, p. 946. 
Andrewi's 1911, Ann. Mas. Nat. Hist. (II) 7, 

p. 310. 

Description (for recognition only). Me- 
dium small; dark, dull; uiu(iue among 



Chlaenius of New Guinea in labrum deeply 
emarginate; length c. 12 mm. 

Type. A $ from Java; in Brussels Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. G.: 
1 6, Bulolo, 2000 ft. (610 m), Mar.-July 
1937 (George Rio, Chicago Mus.); 1 9, 
Main R., Sepik, Feb. 1965 (R. Hornabrook). 

Notes. Chlaenius amplipennis apparently 
ranges from Sumatra and Java to the 
Philippines, New Guinea, and the Solo- 
mons ( Guadalcanal Is., 1944, L. N. Jarcho, 
M.C.Z. ). It varies geographically and some 
of the geographic fonns may be recogniz- 
able subspecies, but I do not have enough 
material to decide about this. 

Chlaenius flaviguftafus Macleay 

Macleay 1825, Annulosa Javanica, p. 14. 
Chaiuloir 1876, Ann. Mus. Ci\\ Cenoa 8, p. 52. 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

5, p. 955 ( see for synonymy and additional 

references ) . 
Andrewes 1941, Ann. Mati. Nat. Hist. (11) 7, 

p. 307 (in key). 
Louwerens 1953, Verhandlungen Naturforschenden 

Cesellschaft Basel 64, p. 311. 
fliittatiis Eschscholtz 1833, Zoologisehen Atlas 5, 

p. 26, pi. 25, fig. 8. 
iiuniactilipcnuis Jedlieka 1951, Ann. Mus. National 

Hungary 1, p. 134 (new synonynn' ). 

Description (for recognition onU). Me- 
dium sized, rather slender; dull, dark, elytra 
2-maculate or immaculate, legs pale usually 
with dark knees; most ol upper surface 
closely conspicuously punctate; palpi with 
apical segments truncate, apices -i or ^-i 
wide as lengtli of segment; see also Key to 
Species; length c. 11-14.5 mm. 

Types. Of flaviL!,uttafus, from Java; in 
Briti.sh Mus. (seen). Of iiuttatus. Ma- 
nil (l)a; Moscow U. Zool. Mus. (not seen). 
Of it)nn(iculi))cnnis. New (hiinea; in Jed- 
licka ('oil. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neu Ciuinca. Widely 
distributed on Ne\\- Guinea ( including 
Doboduia and Wan), and reaching I^iak 
and (in tUv .Vdmiralties ) Manns Is.: 283 
specimens, most at low altitudes but reach- 
ing at least 1300 and 1500 m in places in 
the mountains. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • DaiUngton 27 



Notes. This common Chlaenius is known 
from Sumatra, Java, etc. to New Guinea 
and Australia, east to the Philippines, 
New Britain, New Ireland, Solomons, 
New Hebrides, Fiji, Samoa, and New 
Caledonia. 

Markings vary indwiduaUij in the series 
from New Guinea. Each elytron may have 
a conspicuous irregular subapical pale mark, 
or fragments of such a mark, or no mark at 
all, and the variation occurs in all parts of 
New Guinea from which series have been 
seen. Unmarked individuals are "aberra- 
tion" immacu]ipcnms]ed\\ckA, which I think 
is not worth distinguishing. 

This species occurs in a variety of wet 
places, often in more or less open country. 

Chlaenius bimaculafus pongraczi Jedlicka 

Jedlicka 1951, Ann. Mus. National Hungary 1, 
p. 136. 

Description. Generally similar to typical 
himaciilatus Dejean in technical characters 
( see preceding Key and also Andrewes' key 
to Javan Chlaenius, 1941, Ann. Mag. Nat. 
Hist. (11) 7, p. 307), but differing some- 
what in color and especially in punctation. 
Color bluish black, legs testaceous (not 
bicolored), antennae and mouthparts red- 
dish brown. Punctation of head and pro- 
notum reduced but variable: head with or 
almost without punctulation (most distinct 
posteriorly); pronotum coarsely punctate 
only basally, extensively smooth or in part 
finely punctulate elsewhere; length c. 12- 
14 mm. 

Type. From New Guinea; in Hungarian 
National Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 9, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
7, Mt. Lamington, 1300-1500 ft. (c. 400- 
450 m), (C. T. McNamara, S. Australian 
Mus.); 2, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m). May 
& Aug. 1933 (Cheesman); 1, Daradae, near 
Javarere, Musgrove R., Oct. 4, 1958 
(Gressitt). N-E. N. G.: 3, Sattelberg 
(British Mus.); 1, Wareo, Finschhafen 
(Rev. L. Wagner, S. Australian Mus.); 1, 
Gewak, Salawaket Rge., 1530 m, Sept. 7, 



1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Sepik, Maprik area, 160 m, Aug. 26, 1957 
(D. Elmo Hardy, Bishop Mus.). West 
N. G.: 1, Hollandia, Jan. 1933 (A.M.N.H.); 
1, VVaris S. of Hollandia, 450-500 m, July 
24-31, 1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 2, 
Ifar, Cyclops Mts., 300-500 m, June 23-25, 
Sept. 9, 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, Guega, W. of 
Swart Vy., 1200 m, Nov. 14, 1958 (Gressitt); 
1, Bodem, 11 km SE. of Oerbefareh, 100 m, 
July 7-17, 1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. Chlaenius himaculatus Dejean (or 
the group of closely related species that 
goes under this name) ranges from SE. 
Asia to the Philippines and New Guinea 
(not Australia). I have ample comparative 
material from a number of localities from 
SE. Asia to Amboina. Geographic variation 
is obvious. The New Guinean form varies 
also individually in marking: most individ- 
uals have a conspicuous pale spot before 
apex of each elytron, but the spot varies 
in size and is almost absent in 2 of the 
Sattelberg specimens. 

My Dobodura specimens were taken in a 
grassy bank beside a small river. 

Chlaenius olfhofi n. sp. 

Description. Form (Fig. 10) of Chlaenius 
himaculatus Dejean, slender; head and 
pronotum shining green or greenish black; 
elytra duller, purplish black, with very fine 
c. isodiametric microsculpture; appendages 
rufous. Head 0.72 and 0.76 \\'idth prothorax; 
eyes large, genae short; antennae with 3rd 
segments c. equal to 4th and sparsely 
setulose; mandibles average; clypeus and 
labrum subtruncate or weakly emarginate; 
front with c. punctiform anterior impres- 
sions, otherwise almost impunctate (a few 
punctules posteriorly); mentum with c. 
entire tooth; palpi narrowly truncate at 
apex. Prothorax subquadrate, widest at or 
slightly behind middle; width/length 1.16 
and 1.13; base/apex 1.17 and 1.10; apex not 
margined except vaguely at sides; sides 
broadly rounded, not or at most faintly 
sinuate before obtuse but well defined, 
slightly blunted posterior angles; posterior- 



28 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



lateral setae c. Vin of prothoracic length be- 
fore base, median-lateral setae absent; disc 
with impressed middle line, sublinear 
baso-lateral impressions; surface extensively 
smooth but with a few punctmes mosth' 
near base, sides, and along middle; posterior 
pronotal hair fringe present. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 1.44 and 1.45; margins 
entire at base, rounded at humeri, with 
subapical interruptions; striae moderately 
impressed, vaguely punctulate; intervals 
slightly convex, moderately closely punctate. 
Lower sui'facc shining; proepisterna almost 
impunctate; some punctures on metepisterna 
including epimera and on base of abdomen 
at sides, but much of abdomen smooth or 
nearly so; metepisterna long, margined ex- 
ternally, margin obsolete anteriorly. Inner 
irin^.s full. Lci^s: tarsi c. glabrous above; 
5th segments hind tarsi with c. 7 setae each 
side below. Secondary .sexual characters: 
i front tarsi with 2nd segments c. wide as 
long; <^ front tibiae with small tooth below 
near base; c^ with usually 1, 9 2 or 3 
( unsymmetric in the single 9 ) setae each 
sidc> last ventral segment. Aedeagus slender, 
open above for much of length. Mea.siire- 
ments: length c. 13-14; width c. 4.5-5.0 
mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Leiden Mus.) and 
i i paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,353) 
from Bcrrihard Camp, West N. (i., 50 m, 
July-Sept. 1938 (J. Olthof); 1 9 paratype, 
same locality, Apr. 12, 1939 (Toxopeus); 
1 i paratype, Oro Bay, Pa|»ua, JuK' 12, 
1944 (A. II. Mallery, Bishop Mus.). ' 

Measured specimens. The -' holotype and 
9 paratype. 

Notes. This seems to be a distinct species 
of the himaculatus group, occurring within 
the geographic range of ])iinaculalus sub- 
species pon^raczi. C. olthof i may be a prod- 
uct of an early invasion of a hinuuulatus- 
like stock, pon<^raczi of a later one. 

Chlaenius occulfus Sloane 

Sloane 1907, Dciitsclie Kiit. Zcitscln ill (ni 1!)()7. 
p. 467. 

Descrij)lion (for recognition onlv). A 



medium-sized Chlaenius with subcordate 
prothorax; blue-black, sometimes in part 
greenish, legs reddish testaceous, antennae 
and mouthparts reddish brown; rather 
shining, reticulate microsculpture absent or 
nearly so on head and pronotum, visible on 
elytra especially of female, fine, irregularly 
isodiametric; see also Key to Species of 
Chlaenius of New Guinea; length c. 14- 
17 mm. 

Type. From Herbertshohe, New Britain, 
"returned to Dr. Horn for Bennigsen's col- 
lection" (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 7, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
4, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m), Mav, Aug. 
1933 (Cheesman); 1, Laloki, 1909 (F. Muir, 
Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association ) ; 5, 
Mt. Lamington, 1300-1500 ft. {c. 400-150 
m) (C. T. McNamara, S. Australian Mus.); 
1, Peria Ck., Kwagira R., 50 m, "No. 7," 
Aug. 14-Sept. 6, 1953 (Geoffrev M. Tate, 
A.M.N.H.). N-E. N. G.: 30, vie. Nadzab, 
Julv 1944 (Darlington); 1, Busu R., E. of 
Lae, 100 m, Sept.'" 14, 1955 (Gressitt); 2, 
Wan, 1100, 1200 m, Oct. 30, 1961, Jub- 
28-29, 1963 (Sedlacek). West N. G.: 5. 
Hollandia, Jan., Apr., Mav 1945 ( B. Malkin, 
U.S.N.M.); 1, Humboldt Bay Dist., 1937 
(W. Stiiber, British Mus.); 1, Tanahmerah. 
Res. Boven Digoel, Apr. 24, 1957 (R. T. 
Simon Thomas, Leiden Mus.). 

Notes. I have identified this species from 
Sloanes description: the size, cordate pro- 
thorax, and round(xl humeral margins are 
(together) diagnostic in th(^ region in (pies- 
tion; other dc^tails agree well enough; and 
I have seen a specimen from New Britain 
(near Habaul, l''eb. 1929, Pemberton col- 
lector, in Goll. Ilawaiiaii Sugar Planters 
Association). 

This species occurs in New Britain ( [hv 
t\iK\ and tlu> specimen Iroin near iiabaul 
reierred to abox'c ) and the Soloiiioim 
(Guadalcanal; Bougainville) as wtll as 
eastern and central New (Guinea. I ha\e 
been unable to determine its relationship to 
other si)ecies ol (Chlaenius. It is h)un(l 
under stones on the banks ol lixcrs. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



29 



Chlaenius hamifer malcheri Van Emden 

\'an Emden 1937, Stettiner Ent. Zeitung 98, pp. 
35, 37. 

Description (for recognition only). Me- 
dium small, moderately broad; usually 
very dark with or without slight metallic 
tinge, usually without spots but latter some- 
times partly developed (see Notes below); 
see also Key to Species; length c. 11-12 mm. 

Type. From Pauru, New Georgia, Solo- 
mon Islands (Fr. Malcher); in Van Emden 
Coll., British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 13, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
1, Oro Bay, July 12, 1944 (A. H. Mallery, 
Bishop Mus.); 1, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m), 
Aug. 1933 (Cheesman); 1, Port Moresby, 
Konedobu, Apr. 20, 1958 (J. J. H. Szent- 
Ivany, Dept. Agr. Port Moresby), at light; 
1, Popondetta, Aug. 11, 1962 (A. Catley, 
Dept. Agr. Port Moresby), at light; 1, Mt. 
Lamington, 1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-450 m) 
(C. T. McNamara, S. Australian Mus.); 2, 
Rouku, Morehead R., Apr. 1962 (W. W. 
Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.); 1, Rossel Is. (S.E. 
Papua), Oct. 1963 (W. W. Brandt, C.S.I. 
R.O.). N-E. N. G.: 2, "No. 2, Oomsis," 22 
mi. W. of Lae on Lae-Bulolo Road, 100 m, 
Apr. 26, 1959 (L. J. Brass, A.M.N.H.); 2, 
Wau, Morobe Dist., 1200 m, Dec. 6, 1961, 
Sept. 15-30, 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, Bulolo "G. 
T.," (Sedlaceks); 1, 16 km W. of Mumeng, 
3000-5000 m, May 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, 
Okapa, July 12, 1964 (R. Hornabrook); 1, 
lower Busu R., Huon Pen., May 12, 1955 
(E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.). West N. G.: 1, 
Hollandia, May 1945 (B. Malkin, U.S. 
N.M.); 1, Maffin Bay, June 1944 (E. S. 
Ross, California Acad.); 1, Wissel Lakes, 
Tage Lake, 1760 m, Aug. 4, 1955 (Gressitt); 
1, Wissel Lakes, Enarotadi, 1900-2000 m, 
July 2-11, 1962 (N. Wilson, Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. This species belongs to a difficult 
group of Chlaenius that extends from S. 
Asia to NE. AustraHa. The group includes 
hamafus Dejean as well as hamifer Chaudoir. 
I am not sure whether these two species 
really are different, or with which of them 



malcheri should go. My treatment of it as 
a geographic form of hamifer is tentative. 
The range of hamifer is from S. Asia to 
Australia. 

Apparently only one form of the hamifer- 
hamatus group occurs in New Guinea. It 
is very dark and usually unmarked, but 2 
examples from Dobodura show the posterior 
part of a pale "comma" on the apex of each 
elytron, and the 1 specimen from Port 
Moresby, the 2 from Rouku, and the 1 from 
Hollandia have the "commas" complete but 
narrow. Chlaenius insulanus Louwerens 
(1956, Treubia, 23, p. 234) of the northern 
Moluccas is another dark, unmarked form 
of the hamifer-hamatus group, but is smaller 
and narrower than malcheri. 

C. h. malcheri occurs under cover often 
in somewhat drier places than most other 
Chlaenius except the following (siccus). 

Chlaenius siccus n. sp. 

Description. Form c. average in genus; 
rather shining black, sometimes with slight 
greenish or bluish reflections, appendages 
rufous; reticulate microsculpture absent on 
head and pronotum, fine and c. isodiametric 
on elytra. Head 0.68 and 0.67 width pro- 
thorax; eyes large, genae short; antennae 
with 3rd segments c. equal 4th and scarcely 
setulose; mandibles average, rather short, 
moderately arcuate; labrum and clypeus 
subtruncate; front almost smooth at middle, 
punctate at sides and posteriorly, with 
slight frontal impressions; mentum with 
blunt usually vaguely emarginate tooth; 
palpi slender, narrowly subtruncate at apex. 
Prothorax subquadrate but rather strongly 
narrowed anteriorly; width length 1.28 and 
1.28; base/apex 1.33 and 1.31; sides weakly 
arcuate for most of length, c. straight and 
somewhat converging posteriorly; posterior 
angles obtuse, narrowly rounded; margins 
narrow anteriorly, wider posteriorly, each 
with posterior-lateral setae just before base 
and ( at least in some individuals ) median- 
lateral setae just before middle; disc ir- 
regularly longitudinally impressed each side 



30 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137. No. 1 



c. midway between middle and side, with 
whole surface rather closely but somewhat 
irregularly, coarsely punctate; posterior pro- 
notal hair fringe present. Elytra not nar- 
rowed anteriorly; width elytra prothorax 
1.29 and 1.36; margins entire at base, 
arcuate at humeri, interrupted subapically; 
striae rather coarsely punctate, intervals 
slightly convex, irregularly punctulate. 
Lower swface: proepisterna coarsely punc- 
tate at least in part, mesepisterna partly 
punctate or almost impunctate, sides of 
metasterna punctate, abdomen punctulate 
at sides and across base but extensively 
smooth or nearly so at middle; metepisterna 
long, strongly margined ( grooved ) exter- 
nally. Inner uin^s full. Le<!,s without obvi- 
ous unusual characters; tarsi c. glabrous 
above; 5th segments hind tarsi with a. 4 
setae each side below. Secondary sexual 
characters normal; i front tarsi dilated, 2nd 
segment at least as wide as long; 6 front 
tibiae not toothed; c^ with 1, 9 2 setae each 
side last ventral segment. Measurements: 
length e. 11. .5-13.5; width 4.1-4.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,354) and 14 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 2, 
Mt. Lamington,' 1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-450 
m) (C. T. McNamara, S. Australian Mus.). 
N-E. N. G.: 1, Aitape, Aug.-Sept. 1936 
(Cheesman); 4, Swart Vv., Karubaka, 
1450, 1500, 1550 m, Sept. s', 16, 22, 1958 
(Gressitt), some taken in light trap; 8, 
Wan. Morobe Dist., 1200 m, dates in Jan., 
Feb., Mar., Aug., 1962-1963 (Sedlacek); 
1, Sum-Sum, near Bulolo, Morobe Dist., 
Feb. 7-11, 1966 (Rhonda M. Stevens, Dept. 
Agr. Port Moresby); 7, Minj, W. High- 
lands, 5200 ft. (c. 1600 m). Mar. 25, May 
20, 1960 (J. H. Barrett, Dept. Agr. Port 
Moresby). West N. G.: 1, Ilollandia, May 
1945 (B. Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 1, Kota Nika, 
Res. Ilollandia, Feb. 23, 1956 (R. T. Simon 
Thomas, Louwerens Coll.); 4, Ifar, Cyclops 
Mts., 300-500 m, June 23-25, 1962 (Sed- 
lacek); 1, same locality, 400-800 m, Sept. 9, 
1962 (Sedlacek); 2, 'X;. den Iloed. Tfar," 



Dec. 1957 (Louwerens Coll.); 1, Kebar Vy., 
W. of Manokwari, Vogelkop, 550 m, Jan. 4- 
31, 1962 (S. & L. Quate, Bishop Mus.). 

Measured s))ecimcns. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. In Andrewes' ( 1941, see reference 
under genus) key to the Chlaenius of Java, 
this runs to leucops Wiedemann, of which 
I have specimens from India, Java, and 
Luzon, but the present new species is nar- 
rower, paler-legged, and more shining than 
leucops, with somewhat different sculpture: 
e.g., the punctation of the pronotum is 
coarser and more irregular than in leucops. 
C. siccus is closer to, and may prove to be a 
geographic representative of, ophonoides 
Fairmaire of Australia ( recorded also from 
New Caledonia and New Hebrides ) . How- 
ever, siccus is slightly smaller and much 
darker than oplionoides, being black with- 
out or with only faint metallic tinge while 
ophonoides is always plainly greenish black. 

In habits, this species resembles the pre- 
ceding one (Jiamifcr mah'lieri) and often 
occurs with it, under co\er on compara- 
tively dry ground in more or less open 
places. 

Tribe OODINI 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 

p. 1000 (see for synonyiiiN- and additional reter- 

enees). 
Ooclitac Auet. including Jeannel 1949, Coleop. 

Carabicjues de la Region Malgaelu*. Part 3, p. 

828. 

The members ol this tribe are o\al, 
Amara- or even dytiscid-like, and are black 
or metallic, usually unmarked. Tlu'ir generic 
classification is unsatisfactory (sec^ below. 
and see Notes under Anatrichis and Oodes 
hu'vissimus). However, the 13 species of 
the tribe known from New Cuin(>a obvi- 
oush' inc-huU' no striking ciKk'niic genera 
and, although diNcrse, (lu'\ are less so than 
the oodinc\s ol tlu' Oiiental lu'gion or Aus- 
tralia. The Oriental SysfoU)cranius, Ilolco- 
coleus, Sinu)us (see under Oodes hievis- 
sinuis), etc., and th(> Australian Co])tocarpus 
do not reach New (hiinea. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 31 



The presence or absence of a basal elytral 
margin is a useful key character in this 
tribe but must be determined with care. 
The basal margin is a fine, sharph' marked 
line, impressed or formed by a slight eleva- 
tion of the elytral surface in front of the 
margin, and usually ending inwardly op- 
posite the bases of the 3rd striae or 3rd 
intervals. It is distinct from the basal de- 
pression of the elytra that fits under the 
base of the pronotum. It is best examined 
under diffused light, for a sharply focused 
spotlight makes reflections that simulate a 
margin where none is present. 

Presence or absence of a small seta-bear- 
ing puncture on the posterior edge of the 
pronotum on each side near the basal angle 
is another useful key character that must 
be determined \\'ith care. The setae are 
sometimes very small and weak and easily 
broken off. The punctures may then be 
hard to detect even in clean specimens and 
undetectable in dirty ones. Sometimes these 
setae and punctures vary within single 
species (see Oodes siamensis). 

Clean specimens of Anotrichis pusilla, 
Oodes exiguus, and O. piceus can be seen 
to have a small anterior puncture over each 
eye, with or without a small, weak seta. 
These punctures are lacking in all other 
New Guinean Oodini. This suggests an 
actual relationship among the 3 species 
named, which is supported by the arrange- 
ment of labral setae and by a similarity 
of body form, and this in turn suggests 
that the conventional distinction between 
Anatrichis and Oodes is unnatural. How- 
ever, I cannot recharacterize these 2 widely 
distributed genera on the basis of the few 
I species that occur in New Guinea. 

Most oodines are ac[uatic or subaquatic, 
living in vegetation or among dead leaves 
in or close to standing water, but O. 
laevlssimus Chaudoir and probably also the 
I 2 related species described below (i.e., the 
laevissimus group) live in leaf litter on the 
floor of rain forest. This is the habitat of 
some Copiocarpus in Australia and of cer- 
tain other oodines elsewhere. State of wings 



is correlated with habitat. The wings are 
fully developed in all known New Guinean 
Oodini except the Oodes laevissimus group, 
in which the wings are apparently atrophy- 
ing as the group leaves subaquatic habitats 
and invades terrestrial leaf litter. At the 
same time the group is apparently begin- 
ning to evolve local flightless species in 
different places in New Guinea. 

Key to Genera of Oodini of New Guinea 

1. Size .small (c. 5 mm); clypeus without seta- 
lieaiing punctures; $ front tarsi only slightly 
dilated (p. 31) _.__ Anatriclii.s 

- Size usually larger; // size small, clypeus 
with seta-bearing puncture on each side and 
c^ front tarsi wider ( p. .32 ) Oodes 

Genus ANATRICHIS Leconte 

Leconte 1853, Trans. American Philosophical Soc. 
10, p. 391. 

Chaudoir 1882, Ann. Soc. Ent. France (6) 2, p. 
318. 

Sloane 1910, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
35, pp. 442, 443 (the Australian species). 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 
p. 1003 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diagnosis. Very small Oodini; clypeus 
and posterior margin of pronotum without 
seta-bearing punctures; labrum with clump 
of 4 setae at middle and 1 separate seta each 
side; 6 front tarsi typically only slightly 
dilated, but variable (see Notes below). 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Oodes minutus Dejean, of 
North America. 

Generic distribution. India and Burma 
to Australia; tropical and warm temperate 
America. 

Notes. The characters and limits of this 
genus are doubtful, as suggested in discus- 
sion under the tribe (above). 

Authorities disagree about the c^ front 
tarsi of Anatrichis. Leconte says 4 segments 
are slightly dilated and spongiose (with 
dense squamae) below. Chaudoir says 3 
segments are thus modified. And Sloane 
says only 2 segments have squamae. In fact, 
different species differ in this respect, and 
minor variations of S tarsi may even occur 



32 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



within single species (see Notes under A. 
pimUa, below ) . 

Anafrichis pus'illa Sloane 

Sloane 1910, Pioc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
35, p. 443. 

Description ( diagnostic characters only ) . 
Small, narrow; pronotum usually with an 
almost punctiform impression each side 
near base, but these impressions variable 
and sometimes almost absent; elytra 7- 
striate, striae punctulate; i tarsi slightly di- 
lated, with 2 or 3 segments squamulose be- 
low ( see following Notes ) ; other characters 
given in preceding Key to Genera; length c. 
5 mm. 

Types. Described from 2 specimens 
taken by Sloane near Kuranda, North 
Queensland, Australia, June 1906. I here 
designate as lectotype the single specimen 
now in the Sloane Collection at Canberra. 
It is labeled "Kuranda, Q., T.G.S., 6.06" and 
"Anatrichis pusilla SI., Id. by T. G. Sloane ' 
( seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 5, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 ( Darlington ) ; 9, 
Oro Bay, Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 (Darling- 
ton); 3, Lake Daviumbu, Flv R-, Sept. 
11-20 and 21-30, 1936 (Archbold Exp.. 
A.M.N.H.); 1, Modewa, Modewa Bay, 0-50 
m, "No. 17," Dec. 14, 1956 (L. J. Brass, 
Fifth Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.). N-E. 
N. G.: 1, Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). 
West N. G.: 24, Ilollandia, July-Sept. 1944 
(Darlington); 2, Sarmi, W. of Ilollandia, 
July 20-23, 1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 
3, Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. I have a scries of ))UsilJa from 
North Queensland, Austraha: from Cairns 
(near the type locality), south to Cardwell, 
and north to Silver Plains halfway up the 
C^ape York peninsula. Specimens from New 
(iuinea match Australian ()n(\s well. 

A. ptisilla is similar to and may represent 
Anatrichis indica (^haudoir of India, and I 
ha\'e a related species Iroin Le\ te in the 
Philil)pines. 

I'hr narrowly dilated ,^ front tarsi seem 
to have either 2 or 3 segments squamulose. 



I cannot determine whether this is primarily 
individual variation, or whether the squamae 
are worn off the 3rd segments in some 
individuals, or whether the squamae are 
sometimes pressed against the soles of the 
3rd segments and therefore almost un- 
detectable. 

Genus OODESBonelli 

Bonelli 1810, Observations Ent. 1, table synoptique, 
Mem. Acad. Sci. Turin 18, pp. 21-78. 

Sloane 1910, Proc. Linnean Soc. New Soutli Wales 
35, p. 442 (Australian species). 

Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 
p. 1006 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Andrewes 1940, Proc. R. Ent. Soc. London (B) 
9, pp. 203 ff. (key to species of India, Burma, 
etc. ) . 

Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabitiucs, 
Part 2, p. 980. 

Diaii,nosis. No satisfactory one available. 
For practical purposes all Ne\^' Guinean 
members of the tribe except Anatrichis 
pusilla are assigned to Oodes. 

Description. None required here. 

Tyjx' species. Carahus liclopioidcs Fab- 
ricius, of Europe. 

Generic distribution. Most of the warmer 
parts of the world, but few or none in 
South America. 

Notes. For comments on classification, 
habitats, and state of \\ings see tribe Oodini. 
above. 

Kiiv TO Species of Oonr.s of New Cuixea 

\. Labruni with compact clump of 4 (or 
fewer) .setae at nn'ddle and 1 separate seta 
each side 2 

- Lal)rnni with 6 or 4 separate setae (if 4, 
2 adcbtional uu'nutc setae usually present 
close to.uethi'r near middle) 3 

2. EKtra with 7th striae almost oliliterateil; 
length c. 8 mm (p. 33) ))iccu\ 

- EKtra with 7th striae well impressed; 
length r. .") mm {p. 33) cxii^tdis 

3. CKpeus without seta-bcariiisi; punctures 4 

- Chi^eus with seta-bearing pmnlure each 
side - 7 

4. Prothorax without basal setae or punctmcs 
(p. 33) - nil 
Prolliorax witJi seta or small puncture on or 
near posterior edue eat'h side ( hicvi.ssitiius 
group) 5 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



33 



5. Elytra with hasal margin sharply defined 
( see under tribe Oodini ) ; inner wings 
full or nearly so (p. 34) laevissimti.s 

- Elytra with basal margin obsolete; inner 
wings vestigial 6 

6. EUtral striae distinctly impressed; pos- 
terior pronotal punctures on dorsal surface 

at base (West N. G. ) (p. 34) rossi 

- Elytral striae reduced to fine superficial 
lines; posterior pronotal punctures on basal 
edge of pronotum ( N-E. N. G. ) ( p. 35 ) _„_ 
wiboni 

7. Clypeus margined anteriorly, with setae 

almost in the angles (p. 36) 

siamcnsis vulsus 

- Clypeus not margined, with setae behind 
the angles 8 

8. Prothorax with seta or small puncture each 
side on posterior edge 9 

- Prothorax without such setae or punctures; 
(form stout, convex; c$ luiddle tibiae bent 
near base; length c. 13.5-15.0 mm) (p. 

36 ) denisonensis 

9. Elytra with basal margin sharply defined 
(see under tribe Oodini) (p. 36) siccus 

- Elytra with basal margin obsolete 10 

10. Metepisterna sparsely, vaguely, or not 
punctate (p. 37) par 

- Metepisterna closely punctate 11 

11. Form average, prothoracic width/length c. 
1.65 (p. 37) crihristernis 

- Form slender, prothoracic width/length 1.44- 
1.49 (p. 38) longior 

Oodes piceus Nietner 

Nietner 1856, J. Asiatic Soc. Bengal 25, p. 526. 
Andrewes 19.30, Cat. Indian Insects, Part 18, 

Carabidae, p. 238. 
1940, Proc. R. Ent. Soc. London (B) 9, 

p. 205 (in key). 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 

p. 1010. 

Description (for recognition only). A 
narrowly oval, convex Oodes with elytra 6- 
striate (7th striae absent or faint) and 
other technical characters given by An- 
drewes (1940); length c. 8 mm. See also 
preceding Key and following Notes. 

Type. From Colombo, Ceylon; in Stettin 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Oro Bav, Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 (Darlington). 
West N. G.: 1, Hollandia, 250 ft., May 
1945 (H. Hoogstraal, Chicago Mus.), in 
rain forest. 

Notes. At the British Museum in 1947- 



1948, I compared Oodes piceus with wester- 
manni Laferte as identified by Andrewes, 
and could find no significant external dif- 
ferences except in form of S front tarsi, 
which are wider in westermanni. The New 
Cuinean specimens are 9 9 , so their as- 
signment to piceus is tentative. Oodes 
piceus has been recorded from SE. Asia, 
Sumatra, Java, the Philippines, and Cele- 
bes. O. westermanni occurs in the same 
general area. 

Oodes exiguus Andrewes 

Andrewes 1933, Ent. Monthly Mag. 69, p. 56. 
pijginaeus Andrewes 1936, Treubia 15, p. 218 
(name used in error for exiguus). 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Very 
small, size of Anatrichis pusilla but differing 
as noted below; see also preceding Key to 
Species; length c. 5 mm. 

Types. A S from Sumatra, in Deutsches 
Entomologisches Mus. (not seen); a 9 
"cotype" in Andrewes Coll., British Mus. 
( seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 71, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darhngton); 
12, Oro Bay, Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 (Dar- 
lington). West N. G.: 23, Hollandia, July- 
Sept. 1944 (Darlington); 6, Maffin Bay, 
Aug. 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. The known range of this species 
is now Sumatra (the types), Leyte Is. in 
the Philippines (Darlington, M.C.Z.), 
Morotai Is. in the Moluccas (Darlington, 
M.C.Z.), and New Guinea. It is not known 
in Australia. 

This small oodine differs from Anatrichis 
pusiUa as follows: form wider; only 1 seta 
over each eve (2 in pusilla); mandibles 
longer, straighter; clypeus with seta-bearing 
punctures; elytra with striae not punctulate; 
c? front tarsi wider (2nd segments c. long 
as wide), with 3 segments squamulose 
below. Both A. pusiUa and O. cxii^uus have 
elytra with humeri dentate and 3rd inter\'als 
2-punctate. 

Oodes nil n. sp. 

Description. Form (Fig. 11) average, mod- 
erately convex; black, appendages slightly 



34 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



riifescent; moderately shining, whole upper 
surface with microsculpture of fine c. iso- 
diametric meshes and also fine punctulation. 
Head 0.50 and 0.51 width prothorax; labrum 
6-setose, the 2 middle setae small and close 
together; clypeus not margined, without 
setae; only 1 (posterior) seta over each 
eye; front irregular but scarcely impressed; 
mentum tooth triangular, not distinctly 
emarginate. Prothorax: width length 1.67 
and 1.62; base aj^ex 1.75 and 1.80; disc with 
fine middle line but transverse and baso- 
lateral impressions slight and poorly de- 
fined; posterior edge without setae. Elytra: 
width elytra /prothorax 1.05 and 1.06; basal 
margin present; humeri not dentate; striae 
lightly impressed, finely punctate; intervals 
nearly flat, 8th wide at base, 3rd 2-punctate. 
Inner wings full. Lower surjaee: prosternal 
process weakly or not margined between 
coxae; sides of body including metepisterna 
extensively and closely punctate. Secondary 
sexual charaeters: 9 with 1 seta each side 
last ventral segment; 6 unknown. Measure- 
ments (types); length 10.5-11; width 3.3- 
3.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,555) from Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 
1944 (Darlington); 1 9 paratype from Oro 
Bay (near Dobodura), Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 
(Darlington). 

Additional material. One 9 , Maffin Bav, 
West N. G., June 1944 (E. S. Ross, CaH- 
fornia Acad.). 

Measured specimens. The holotype and 
paratyp(\ 

Notes. For distinguishing characters of 
this species see preceding Key to S))ecies, 
and Notes under Codes siccus (p. 37). 
The specimen from Maffin Bay is larger 
than the types (length r. 12.5 mm) but has 
the same technical characters. 

Oodes laevissimus Chaudoir 

Cliauiloir 1882, Aim. Soc. Eiit. France (6) 2, p. 

361. 
Andrpwes 1924, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) II, 

p. 588 ( Simons) . 

Description f for recognition onl\). I'orm 



parallel, depressed; strongly shining; elytra 
lightly striate; for technical characters see 
preceding Key to Species; length c. 11.5- 
12.5 mm. 

Types. From Fly R., presumably Papiia, 
collected by D'Albertis; the actual type {t. 
Andrewes) in Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: Fly 
R. (the types); 22, Dobodura, Mar.-Julv 
1944 (Darlington); 1, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 
m), Aug. 1933 (Cheesman). N-E. N. G.: 
19, Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 7, 
lower Busu R., Huon Pen., Apr. 4, Mav 13, 
1955 (E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.); 2, Erima, 
Astrolabe Bay, 1897 (Biro); 1, Sattelberg 
(British Mus.); 2, Wareo, Finschhafen (Rev. 
L. Wagner, S. Australian Mus.). 

Notes. This distinct species is probabl\- 
confined to New Guinea, perhaps to the 
eastern and central part of the island. An- 
drewes referred it to the genus or subgenus 
Simous, but I think this was a mistake. 
Simous seems to be a natural group of about 
9 known species confined to the Oriental 
Region including Sumatra, Java, and Borneo, 
and characterized by a very short, broad 
labrum and a broad, emarginate mentum 
tooth. Oodes laevissimus has the labrum 
narrower, the mentum tooth narrowcM- and 
scarcely emarginate. 

The wings in some individuals of this 
species look fully developed and fit for 
flight but in others they appear slightly 
reduced (but still nearly full) and unfit 
for flight. It is doubtful if an\- indixiduals 
realK' lly. I ha\-e seen none Irom light 
traps. 

Although all other New Ouinean Oodini 
that I have collectt^d are ac^uatie or semi- 
acjuatic-, this one is not associated w ith open 
water but lives among dead leaves on the 
lloor of rain forest. This is probabl\- also 
the habitat ol the two related ionns de- 
scribed below . 

Oodes rossi n. sp. 

D('scri))lioii. I'^oiin as in Figure 12. c. as 
Idci'issimus. subparallcl. rathc-i" depress(>d; 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



35 



black; tarsi, antennae, and mouthparts more 
brownish; moderately shining, entire upper 
surface with very fine c. isodiametric micro- 
sculpture but without or with only in- 
distinct punctulation. Head 0.52 width 
prothorax; labrum 6-setose; clypeus not 
margined, without setae; 1 (posterior) seta 
over each eye; frontal impressions distinct 
but poorly defined; mentum with mod- 
erately broad c. truncate tooth. Prothorax: 
width ^length 1.66; base /apex 1.69; disc 
flattened especially posteriorly, with middle 
line (and superficial irregularities) but no 
other distinct impressions; 1 well impressed 
seta-bearing puncture on each side on dorsal 
surface just before basal edge. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.09; basal margin 
obsolete; humeri not dentate; striae slightly 
impressed, faintly punctulatc; intervals 
nearly flat, 8th wide at base, 3rd with 
2 inconspicuous dorsal punctures. Inner 
wings atrophied, reduced to narrow strips c. 
Vs long as elytra. Lower surface: prosternal 
process not margined between coxae; 
metepisterna (and rest of lower surface) 
virtually impunctate. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: S front tarsi moderately dilated (2nd 
segments slightly wider than long), 3 seg- 
ments densely squamulose below; 6 with 1 
seta each side last ventral segment; 9 un- 
known. Measurements: length 14; width 
5.9 mm. 

Type. Holotype i ( California Acad. ) 
from Maffin Bay, West N. G., June 14, 
1944 (E. S. Ross); the type is unique. 

Notes. This species has probably dif- 
ferentiated locally, from /f/ei;/.s.s/r7H/.S'-like 
stock, by atrophy of the wings, obliteration 
of the basal elytral margin, and other small 
changes. 

Oodes wilsoni n. sp. 

Description. Form (Fig. 13) and char- 
acters of the preceding species ( rossi ) ex- 
cept as follows. Head 0.51 width prothorax. 
Prothorax: width/length 1.72; base/apex 
1.78; basal seta-bearing punctures on (not 
before) basal edge of pronotum. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.06; striae very 



fine, superficial. Inner wings reduced to 
vestiges c. V-i long as elytra. Secondary 
sexual characters: S unknown; 9 with 1 
seta each side last ventral segment. Mea- 
surements: length 14; width 5.9 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,556) from Ebabaang, Mongi watershed, 
Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., 1300-1400 m, Apr. 
16-18, 1955 (E. O. Wilson); the type is 
unique. 

Notes. This is apparently another local- 
ized flightless species derived from laevis- 
simiis-like stock. 

(Oodes siamensis Chaudoir) 

Chaudoir 1882, Ann. Soc. Ent. France (6) 2, p. 

358. 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 

p. 1011. 
/.s.s!/.s' Andievves 1931, J. Federated Malay Mus. 16, 

pp. 434, 444, fig. 4 (new synonymy). 
alesi Jedlicka 1936, Acta Soc. Ent. Czechoslovakia 

33, p. 66 (new synonymy). 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
average, depressed; black; clypeus mar- 
gined, with setae in angles; see siamensis 
vulsus in preceding Key to Species of Oodes, 
but note basal seta-bearing punctures of pro- 
notum usually present in typical siamensis 
( see Notes below ) ; length c. 8-9 mm. 

Types. Of siamensis, from Bangkok, 
Thailand; in Oberthiar Coll., Paris Mus. 
( not seen ) . Of issus, from Brunei, Borneo; 
in Andrewes Coll., British Mus. (seen). Of 
alesi, from Mt. Makiling, Luzon; in British 
Mus. ( seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Represented 
only by the following subspecies. 

Notes. The synonymy suggested above 
is based on examination of the types of 
issus and alesi at the British Museum, and 
comparison with many specimens from 
other localities. They seem to represent 
one variable species which is widely dis- 
tributed in SE. Asia, Sumatra, Borneo, 
the Philippines, New Guinea, and New 
Britain, and presumably intervening is- 
lands too. 

My single specimen of siamensis ( issus ) 
from Borneo has distinct basal pronotal 



36 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, Xo. 1 



setae on both sides, but they rise from 
scarcely detectable punctures that could 
hardly be seen if the setae were missing. 
Some, but perhaps not all, of my specimens 
of this species (alesi) from Leyte have 
these setae present too. However, I have 
carefully examined both sides of all 36 
specimens of the species from New Guinea 
and 16 from New Britain, and can find no 
trace of basal pronotal setae or punctures 
in any of them. This gives a basis for 
separating the New Guinea-New Britain 
population as a geographical subspecies 
(below). First, however, I have had to 
discuss siamenms as a whole, in order to 
establish the synonymy and distribution of 
the species. 

Oodes s'tamensis vulsus n. subsp. 

Description. Similar to sianieiisis scnsu 
stricto (above) but without seta-bearing 
punctures on basal edge of pronotum. 
Head 0.51 and 0.51 width prothorax. Pro- 
thorax: width/length 1.57 and 1.63; base/ 
apex 1.81 and 1.84. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.08 and 1.07. Measurements: 
length c. 8-9; width 3.3-3.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,357) and 13 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). Ad- 
ditional paratypes from West N. G.: 20, 
ilollandia, July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
"Neth. New Guinea," Oct. 20, 1944 (T. 
Aarons, California Acad.). 

Measured sj)eeiniens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This subspecies occurs also in 
New Britain ( 16, Cape Gloucester, Dar- 
lington, M.C.Z.). 

Oodes denisonensis Castelnau 

Castelnau 1867, Notes on .Vuslialiaii C^olcoptcra, p. 

64. 
Sloaiic 1910, Proc. Liimcan Soc. N(nv .South Wales 

35, pp. U5, 447. 
Csiki 1931, Cok'op. Cat., Carabidac, Haipalinac 5, 

p. 1007. 

Description (for recognition only). Form 
broad, convex; for technical characlcM-s see 



Sloane's (1910) key, and preceding Key to 
Species of Oodes of New Guinea; length 
c. 13.5-15 mm. 

Type. From Port Denison (probably 
near Bowen, Queensland), Australia; pres- 
ent location of type unknown (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1 

9 , Rouku, Morehead R., Apr. 1962 {W. \\. 

Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). West N. G.: 1 9, 

Merauke (south coast), sea level. Mar. 28, 

1955 (L. D. Brongersma, Leiden Mus.). 

Notes. The distinctixe characters of 
denisonensis are based on the c5 . The two 
9 9 from New Guinea agree well in non- 
sexual details with specimens from Queens- 
land, Australia (from Gayndah, Rockhamp- 
ton, Townsville, and Kuranda), 

Oodes siccus n. sp. 

Description. Form and convexity average; 
black, basal angles of prothorax and ap- 
pendages slightly more reddish; moderately 
shining, whole upper surface finely c. iso- 
diametrically microreticulate and iiunctu- 
late. Head 0.52 and 0.51 width pro- 
thorax; labrum 6-setose; chpeus not mar- 
gined, with 1 seta-bearing puncture each 
side well behind angle; 1 (posterior) seta- 
bearing puncture o\er each eye; front 
weakly convex, scarcely impressed an- 
teriorly; mentum with rounded-triangular 
tooth. Prothorax: width length 1.59 and 
1.68; base apex 1.82 and 1.83; disc with 
fine middle line, vague wide baso-lateral 
impressions, and seta-b(>aring jnmcture each 
side on basal edge inside angle. Elytra: 
width elytra j^rothorax 1.08 and 1.09; base 
margined; humeri not dentat(>; striae mod- 
erateK- impressed, laintK punetulate; in- 
terxals slightK' convex, 8th wide at base, 
3rd 2-punetale. Inner uiii'j^s lull. Lower 
surface: prosternal process not margined 
between coxae; sides of body iiieluding 
metepistcMiia closely punctate. Seco)id(iry 
sexual eharaclers: S w itli Ironl tarsi slightly 
narrower than usual (2nd segments slightK 
longer than wide), with usual 3 s(\gments 
densely squamulose; i with 1, 9 2 setae 
each side last \("ntr;il setiment. Measure- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 37 



mcnts: length c. 10-11; width 4.0-4.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,358) and 12 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 ( DarHngton ) ; and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 6, 
Lake Daviumbu, Flv R., Aug. 19-30, Sept. 
1-10, 11-20, 1936 (Archbold Exp., A.M. 
N.H.). West N. G.: 8, Hollandia, July- 
Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured speeitnens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This is similar to Oodes cribris- 
ternis and its allies, but differs in having a 
distinet basal elytral margin. It is similar 
also to O. nil (described above) but clypeal 
and basal pronotal setae are present ( absent 
in nil), the elytral striae are less obviously 
punctate, and the punctures of the 3rd 
intervals are less impressed. 

O. siccus occurs also on Morotai Is. in 
the Moluccas (Darlington, M.C.Z.). 

Oodes par n. sp. 

Description. Form ( Fig. 14 ) more quad- 
rate than usual, depressed; black, append- 
ages in part more rufous; dorsal microsculp- 
ture of fine c. isodiametric meshes with very 
little additional punctulation. Head 0.57 
and 0.59 width prothorax; labrum 6-setose; 
clypeus not margined, with seta-bearing 
punctiu-e each side behind angle; 1 (pos- 
terior) seta over each eye; mentum tooth 
entire, bluntly triangular. Prothorax: width/ 
length 1.57 and 1.61; base/apex 1.62 and 
1.51; disc depressed, with moderate middle 
line, vague transverse impressions, distinct 
but poorly defined rounded baso-lateral 
impressions ( sublinear in some lights ) , and 
strong seta on basal edge each side inside 
angle. Elytra subquadrate; width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.11 and 1.13; basal margin obso- 
lete; humeri not dentate; striae impressed, 
punctulate; intervals slightly convex, 8th 
wide to base, 3rd 2-punctate. Inner icings 
full. Lower sui^ace: prosternal process not 
distinctly margined between coxae; sides of 
body including metepisterna vaguely or not 
punctate. Secondary sexual characters: S 
front tarsi moderately dilated (2nd seg- 



ments barely wider than long ) , 3 segments 
densely squamulose; S with 1, 9 2 seta- 
bearing punctures each side last ventral seg- 
ment. MeaMirements: length c. 11-12; 
width c. 4.6 mm. 

Types. Holotype c5 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,359 ) from Aitape, N-E. N. G., Aug. 1944 
(Darlington); and 1 9 paratype, Hollandia, 
West N. G., July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. The technical characters, espe- 
cially the positions of setae and loss of the 
basal elytral margin, suggest that this new 
species may be allied to O. crihristernis 
and longior, but j)ar differs from both in 
being more quadrate and in having the 
lower surface including the metepisterna 
relatively smooth. 

Oodes cribrisfernis Bates 

Bates 1892, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 32, p. 323. 
Csiki 1931, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 5, 

p. 1007. 
Andrewes 1940, Proc. R. Ent. Soc. London ( B ) 

9, p. 204 (in key). 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
moderately slender, depressed; distinguish- 
ing characters indicated in preceding Key 
to Species of Oodes of New Guinea and in 
Andrewes' (1940) key. Prothorax: width/ 
length 1.67 and 1.63; base/apex 1.63 and 
1.58. Elytra: width elytra /prothorax 1.10 
and 1.13. Measurements (of New Guinean 
specimens ) : length 10.5-13.5; width 4.2- 
5.5 mm. 

Type. From Burma, in Genoa Mus. (not 
seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 27, 
Mihie Bay, Dec. 1943 (Darlington); 14, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
1, Mt. Lamington, 1300-1500 ft. (c. 400- 
450 m) (C. T. McNamara, S. Australian 
Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 1, Lae, Oct. 1944 
(Darlington); 2, Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Dar- 
lington); 4, Finschhafen, Huon Pen., 10 m, 
Apr. 9-16, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Wau, Mt. 
Missim, Morobe Dist., 880-1050 m, Feb. 
8-9, 1963 (Sedlacek). West N. G.: 1, 
Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 7, 
Sansapor, Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 1, "Neth. 



38 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoologij, Vol. 137, No. 1 



New Guinea" without further locality, Oct. 
20, 1944 (T. Aarons, California Acad.)- 

Measured specimens. A pair (69) from 
Dobodura. 

Notes. The specimens from New Guinea 
here recorded as crihristcrnis possess all 
significant characters given in Bates' brief 
description and Andrewes' key ( 1940 ) , but 
direct comparison will be necessary to con- 
firm the identification. The species (if it 
is one species ) is now known from Burma, 
Sumatra, and New Guinea. O. ohloniius 
Castelnau of Australia seems to be allied 
but is larger, duller, with finer elytral striae. 

Ooc/es longior n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 15, 
slender, depressed; black, posterior angles 
of prothorax and parts of appendages (es- 
pecially tarsi, palpi, antennae) ± reddish; 
moderately shining, entire upper surface 
with fine c. isodiametric microsculpture and 
very fine inconspicuous punctulation. Head 
0.56, 0.5(S, and 0.59 width prothorax; labrum 
6-setose; clypeus not margined, with a 
seta each side behind angle; 1 (posterior) 
seta-bearing puncture over each eye; men- 
tum tooth moderate, impressed or slightly 
emarginate. Prothorax: width/length 1.46, 
1.44, and 1.49; base/apex 1.70, 1.66, and 
1.69; disc with light middle line, no distinct 
sulibasal impressions but faintly impressed 
each side at extreme base; 1 seta-bearing 
puncture on l)asal edge each side near 
narrowly rounded basal angles. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.07, 1.09, and 1.09; 
basal margin obsolete; humeri not dentate; 
apices subangulate near suture (opposite 
1st intervals); striae lightly impressed, 
faintly punctulat(>; intervals slightly convex, 
(Sth slightly narrower than 7th al l)ase, 3rd 
2-punctate. huier ivings full. Loner sur- 
face: proslernal process not distinctly mar- 
gined between coxae; sides ol body below 
including metepisterna rather finely, closely 
punctate. Secondary .sexual characters: $ 
fronl larsi moderately dilated (2nd segment 
c. wide as long), 3 segments densely 
squamnlose b(4ow; ', with 1, 9 2 seta-bear- 



ing punctures each side last ventral seg- 
ment. Measurements: length c. 14-15; 
width 5.2-5.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,360) and 1 9 paratvpe from Hollandia, 
West N. G., July-Sept! 1944 ( Darlington ) ; 
and 1 i para type from Ambunti, Sepik R.. 
N-E. N. G., May 16, 1929 (Crane-Field 
Mus. Pacific Exp., Chicago Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype, 9 
paratype from Hollandia, and S paratype 
from Ambunti, in this order. 

Notes. This new species has the technical 
characters (setae, etc.) of crihristcrnis 
( above ) but is larger and more slender ( cf. 
proportions of criljri.^ternis), with elytra 
subangulate at apex. 

Although cri1)risfcrnis, like most Oodini, 
lives in very wet places, longior may be even 
more aquatic. My 2 specimens were taken 
in comparatively deep water in floating 
debris and vegetation. 

Tribe HARPAUNI 

Sloane 1898, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
23, pp. 455, 456 (key to Australian genera). 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 
pp. 1023-1268. 

Van Emden 1953, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (12) 6, 
pp. 513 ff. (discussion in text). 

Iliirpalkhic Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. 
Caraliic}ues, l^ut 2, pp. 57.5-584. 

Harpalinae Basilevvsky 1951-1952, Ann. Mus. 
Congo Beige (8), Zool., Vols. 6 and 9 (revision 
of .Xfrican and Madagascan forms). 

The tribe liarpalini contains a large 
proportion of the common, medium-sized 
(Carabidae that live on the ground in all 
climates in all parts of the world. The\' are 
very nmnerous in open country, fewer in 
rain forest. Those that do li\c' in rain lorest 
include many Lccanomcrus in eastern Aus- 
tralia and most Trichotichnus in Ne\\- 
Ciuinea. The tribe also contains many 
smaller species that \i\v in wet places or 
b(\side quiet (usually not rapidh' running) 
Wider. 

(Classification of genera within the Ilar- 
jxilini is exceptionalh' difficult, perhaps (I 
suspect) because the tribe is relatixcly re- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



39 



cent in evolution and dispersal. Generic 
classifications proposed for members of the 
tribe in any one region fail in other regions, 
and no usable classification exists for the 
genera of the Oriental Region and Malay 
Archipelago. The arrangement of genera 
in the Junk Catalogue (Csiki, 1932) is said 
to follow Schauberger, but he died without 
explaining it. The classification that I am 
using for the New Guinean forms ( see Key, 
below) is based partly on well known 
characters that are probably phylogenetic, 
but nevertheless the key is partly superficial 
and is intended primarily as an aid in 
identification, not as a contribution to 
harpaline classification. 

Characters drawn from the soles of the 
male tarsi are fundamental in harpaline 
taxonomy but are, of course, useless in the 
case of unassociated females. (The single 
possible Trichotichmis that I have from 
Australia is a female and therefore not 
identifiable! ) And characters of the mouth- 
parts, including the setae of the penultimate 
segments of the labial palpi, are funda- 
mental too, but are difficult to see and 
understand. Even experienced carabid 
specialists make mistakes in placing har- 
paline genera. Bates' original placing of 
Lamprophonus- and Andrewes' of Carbanus 
are examples. Both genera were originally 
wrongly characterized and put in the wrong 
subtribes. Many of the harpalines that I 
have for study from New Guinea were taken 
in light traps, and this increases the dif- 
ficulty. Light-trap specimens often have 
moth scales adhering to and concealing 
their mouthparts and tarsal soles, and scales 
stuck to the tarsal soles may even counter- 
feit sexual squamae. 

The distribution of Harpalini over the 
world has been misunderstood until re- 
cently because of lack of adequate subtribal 
and generic classifications, and because of 
incorrect assignments of many Australian 
and South American species to northern 
genera, especially to Harpalus and Aniso- 
dactylus. Van Emden (1953), however, 
has suggested what I think are natural and 



Table 1. Distribution of Principal Subtribes 
OF Harpalini (after Van Emden 1953) 

1. Anisodactylina: worldwide, but irregularly 
distributed; genera in Australia and South America 
are prolaably not directly related. 

2. Harpalina, Harpali ( Harpalu.s and its im- 
mediate allies ) : tliroughout Eurasia, Africa ( and 
Madagascar), and North America; absent in Aus- 
tralia and South America. 

3. Harpalina, Selenophori: most of the world 
including South America, but absent in most of 
Australia (one or two Oriental genera reach just 
the northern edge of Australia ) . 

4. Pelmatellina: chiefly Australia and South ( and 
Central) America. The genus Nemaglossa may 
occur in both Australia and South America but 
lias not been adequately studied. 

5. Acupalpina: nearly worldwide, with some 
genera very widely distributed. The members of 
this subtribe are mostly small, water-loving forms 
which do not compete with most members of 
the other subtribes, except perhaps with small 
Pelmatellina in Australia. 

useful subtribes and has indicated their 
distributions. His arrangement, slightly 
modified, is summarized in Table 1. 

This outline of harpaline distribution 
(Table 1) is, of course, an oversimphfica- 
tion. A more detailed study of the distribu- 
tion of subtribes of Harpahni would be an 
important contribution to insect zoogeogra- 
phy. 

Within the limits of New Guinea and 
Australia, harpaline faunae overlap com- 
plexly. Among larger, terrestrial Harpalini 
at low altitudes, several primarily Aus- 
tralian genera of subtribe Anisodactylina 
(Gnathaphanus, Diciphoromerus, Hyphar- 
pax) extend to New Guinea and westward 
into or across the Malay Archipelago. These 
genera live chiefly in relatively open 
country, including open Eucalyptus wood- 
land, although some of them enter rain 
forest too. On the other hand, several pri- 
marily Oriental genera of subtribe Har- 
palina, especially Trichotichmis and other 
Selenophori (but not Harpalus), reach New 
Guinea and are dominant there, outnum- 
bering the Australian Anisodactylina espe- 
cially in rain forest. These genera either 



40 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



do not extend to Anstralia or are repre- 
sented there by single species on the ex- 
treme northern edge of the continent (e.g., 
a CoIeoUssus on Cape York). The Austrahan 
genera, chiefly in more open country, and 
the Oriental ones, chiefly in rain forest, are 
in part ecologically as well as geographi- 
cally complementary. This pattern suggests 
recent multiple invasions of the rain- 
forested areas of New Guinea by Oriental 
stocks and of the more open areas by Aus- 
tralian stocks, but over a long period some 
replacement of Australian by incoming, 
competing Oriental groups may have oc- 
curred. 

At much higher altitudes on New Guinea 
is one additional genus of Anisodactylina, 
CJiydaeus, which is primarily Asiatic and 
has apparently "mountain hopped" across 
the Malay Archipelago. This genus does 
not reach Australia. 

Among smaller, water-loving Harpalini, 
primarily Oriental Acupalpina are domi- 
nant in New Guinea and several genera 
reach the northern half of Australia, but 
they decrease or disappear in southern Aus- 
tralia. Their place there is taken by small 
Pelmatellina {Lecanomenis), which are 
ninnerous throughout Australia and a few 
of which occur in New Guinea (described 
in the following pages) but which are un- 
known farther west in the Malay Archipel- 
ago. The distributions of Oriental Acu- 
palpijia and of small Australian Pelmatellina 
are therefore broadly complementary too 
in the Australian Region, but with wide and 
complex overlapping. 

Key to Geneha ok IIaiu'ai.im oi' New Guinea 

1. Male front and micldle tarsi with sponge- 
like soles of many densely packed, narrow 
adhesive hairs 2 

- Male front and nsually (not always) middle 
tarsi 2-seriately scinanuilose below, or 
rarely ( Lyter only) with more than 2 
rows of long, narrow seales loosely ar- 
ranged - 6 

2. Size larger (6-lfi nun); scntellar striae 
present (short in llii]>h(ir])(ix); pennltimate 
segments labial palpi plnrisetose (Aniso- 
dactylina ) 3 



- Size smaller ( less than 5 mm in New 
Guinea); scntellar striae absent; penulti- 
mate segments labial palpi 2-setose 

( Pelmatellina ) ( p. 45 ) Lecanameriis 

3. Elytra without dorsal pimetures; wings 
atrophied; (found only on high mts.) (p. 

47 ) Chijdacus 

- Elytra each with 1 or more dorsal pime- 
tures; wings usually full 4 

4. Elytra with se\eral or many conspicuous 
dorsal punctures (p. 41) ,-. Gnathaphanus 

- Elytra each with 1 dorsal pimcture _ . 5 

5. Posterior tarsi long, basal segment much 
more than 2X long as wide; hind femora 
not strongly curved (p. 42) __ Diaphorovxents 

- Posterior tixrsi shorter, basal segment 2X 
or less long as wide; hind femora of c5 
strongly curved, of 2 less so ( p. 44 ) 
Hyphen pax 

6. Penultimate segment labial palpi with more 
than 2 setae anteriorly; often larger ( 5- 

11 mm) (Harpalina) 7 

- Penultimate segment labial palpi 2-setose 
anteriorly; often smaller (2.7-8.0 mm) 
(Acupalpina) 12 

7. Front tibiae broader, apex % or % wide 
as tibial length (by measurement) (p. 
59) Harpaloxenns 

- Front tibiae narrower 8 

8. Entire upper surface pubescent ( p. 48 ) __ 
PIdti/ntcfopus 

- Upper surface not pubescent 9 

9. Elytra with 3rd intervals 1-punctate or 
impunctate 10 

- Elytra with 3rd intervals with several 
(very small) punctiues 11 

10. Male front and middle tarsi with soles of 
long, slender, loose (not 2-seriate) scales; 
base of prosternuin and base of abdomen 
not pubescent (p. 63) Lytcr 

- Male front and (usually) middle tarsi 2- 
seriateh' s(iuanndose; b;ise ot pronotnm 
and b;ise of abdomen usually short-pubes- 
cent (but see Notes under T. nwiliu.s) 
(p. 48) -, - riirln>lirlmu.s 

11. Last \entral segment with 2 sel;ie e;ich 
side in both sexes; eh tra with sutural 
angles denticulate ( in New Guinean 
species) (p. 64) Coleoli.ssus 

- Last ventral seguient with 1 si-ta each side 
in both sexes; sutural angles not denticulate 
(p. 66) Ily))luicri()u 

12. Scutt'llar striae absent; anicrior iii;uginal 
line of pronotnm ^\^'^'\^ and entire; length r. 
7-8 nun (p. 68) .A/i<)/)/(),i,'r;i;(/.v 

- Scntellar striae present; iuilerior m;irgin;il 
line of pronotnm line or interruptiil ;it 
middle; usualK sm;iller 13 

13. Abdomen not pubescent (except for fi.xed 
setae ) ( p. 69 ) Egadroina 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



41 



- Abdomen pubescent at least near apex 14 
14. Prosternuni without long setae anteriorly 

(p. 71) Stcnoloplius 

- Prosternuni with several long setae an- 
teriorly ( p. 72 ) Acupalpus 

Genus CNATHAPHANUS Macleay 

Macleay 1825, Annulosa Javanica 1, p. 20. 

Chaudoir 1878, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 12, pp. 
476, 503. 

Sloane 1900, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
24, p. 553 ( key to some Australian species ) . 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 
p. 1041 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diaii.no.sis. See preceding Key to Genera 
of IlarpaJini of New Guinea. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. G. vidneripennis Macleay, 
of Java, etc. 

Generic distribution. Many species in 
Australia, fewer in the Malay Archipelago 
and adjacent comer of Asia, with one or 
two widely distributed species reaching 
India, the Philippines, and islands east to 
Samoa and New Caledonia. 

Notes. Some species of this genus have 
very wide ranges, within the limits given 
above. Of the 5 species known in New 
Guinea, all are shared with Australia and 
several are widespread also on the Malay 
Archipelago or islands of the western 
Pacific. These insects are often common in 
open coimtry including grassland and open 
woodland, but are not often found in rain 
forest. All species of the genus that I know 
are fully winged and probably fly. 

Key to Species of Gnathaphanus of New Guinea 

1. Elytra with intervals 3, 5, and usually 7 (at 
least posteriorly) with dorsal punctures con- 
spicuously impressed; (black, legs black; 
elytra deeply sinuate and acuminate at apex) 
(p. 41) licinoidcs 

- Elytra with fewer, less impressed dorsal 
punctures 2 

2. Elytra with series of dorsal punctures on 
outer edges of intervals 3 and ( at least pos- 
teriorly) 5; (legs yellow) (p. 41) upolcnsis 

- Elytra with series of dorsal punctures only 
on 3rd intervals ( single punctures sometimes 
present on other intervals) 3 

3. Smaller ( c. 9-10 mm ) ; more shining ( es- 



pecially the S ) ; piceous, legs brownish 
yellow ( p. 42 ) picipes 

- Larger (c. 12-13 mm); dull black or me- 
tallic, legs black 4 

4. Head and prothorax green, elytra cupreous 
(except in discolored individuals); pos- 
terior angles of prothorax distinct, bluntly 
obtuse or very narrowly rounded (p. 42) .. 
pulcher 

- Dull black; posterior angles of prothorax 
broadly rounded (p. 42) philippcnsis 

Gnathaphanus licinoides Hope 

Hope 1842, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 9, p. 427. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 
p. 1042 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description. None required here; see 
Key, above; length c. 10 mm. 

Type(s). From Port Essington, northern 
Australia; presumably in Hope Mus., Ox- 
ford (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 24, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m), Sept. 1933 
(Cheesman); 1, Wakaiuna, Sewa Bay, Nor- 
manby Is., Jan. 1-8, 1957 (W. W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 18, Wau, 1200 
m, dates in Jan., Mar., Apr., June, July, 
Sept., Nov., Dec. 1961-1963 (Sedlaceks); 
1, Stephansort, Astrolabe Bay, 1899 ( Biro ) ; 
1, Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). West 
N. G.: 1, Hollandia, May 1945 (B. Malkin, 
U.S.N.M.); 1, same area, Cyclops Mts., 50- 
100 m, June 22-24, 1959 (Gressitt, T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.), in light trap. 

Notes. Tlie known range of licinoides in- 
cludes northern Australia, New Britain, 
the Solomons, New Hebrides, and New 
Caledonia, as well as New Guinea. 

Gnafhaphanus upolensis (Csiki) 

Csiki 1915, Denkschriften Akad. Wiss. Wien, 
Math-Nat. 91, p. 163 (Diortjche). 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 
p. 1044 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

impressipennis Castelnau 1867, Notes on Aus- 
tralian Coleop., p. 100 ( in Harpalus, but not 
Harpahis iiu))ressipennis Motschulsky 1844). 

Chaudoir 1878, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 12, p. 510. 

Description. None required here; length 
c. 8-9 mm. 



42 BuUetin Museum of Coynparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Types. Of impressipennis, from Rock- 
hampton, Australia; in Genoa Mns. Of 
upolensis, from Upolu, Samoa; in Vienna 
Mils, (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
( 175 specimens seen ) probably throughout 
New Guinea at low altitudes including 
Dobodura, up to 1200 m at Wau and to 
2300 m on Mt. Kaindi ( near Wau ) . Speci- 
mens taken in every month. 

Notes. This very^ common carabid occurs 
usually in relatively open country, includ- 
ing grassland and open Eucalyptus wood- 
land, from the Malay Peninsula across the 
Malay Archipelago to New Guinea and 
Australia, east at least to the Philippines 
and Samoa, and New Caledonia. 

Gnafhaphanus picipes (Macleay) 

Macleay 1864, Trans. Ent. Soc. New South Wales 
1, p. 117 (Harpahis). 

Chaudoir 1878, Ann. Mus. Civ. Gencxi 12, p. 509. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 
p. 104.3 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

De.<icription. None required here; length 
c. 9-10 mm. 

Types. From Port Denison (Bowen), 
Queensland, Australia; probably in Mac- 
leay Mus., Sydney (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 12, 
Port Moresby, Jan., Feb., Mar., May, Aug., 
Oct., Dec. (various collectors; M.C.Z., 
British Mus., Bishop Mus., U.S.N.M., Dept. 
Agr. Port Moresby), some under logs in 
FAicali/))lus country, some at light; 2, Browu 
K., May 22, 25, 1956 (F. J. Ford. Jr., Bishop 
Mus.).' 

Notes. This uortheastcrn Australian 
species apparently extends only to the 
southern edge of New Guinea. 

Gnafhaphanus pulcher (Dejean) 

Dejean 1829, Species Cleneral Coleop. 4, p. 282 
( llai))altis). 

Cliaiidoir 1878, .Ann. Mus. Civ. Cenoa 12, p. .505. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caral)idae, Harpalinae 6, 
p. 1043 (.see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description. None required here; length 
r. l.'3-16 mm. 



Types. From "Nouvelle-Hollande" ( = 
Australia); presumably in Oberthiir Coll., 
Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 13, 
Port Moresby area, various dates in Jan.. 
Feb., Mar., May (various collectors; Dept. 
Agr. Port Moresby); 3, Bisianumu, 1600 ft. 
(485 m), Feb. 12,'l966 (J. H. Barrett, Dept. 
Agr. Port Moresby ) . 

Notes. This Australian species apparently 
reaches only the southern part of New 
Guinea, perhaps only the open-wooded 
Eucalyptus areas where many other Austra- 
lian insects occur. It is represented on the 
Lesser Sunda Islands, west to Bali, by 
subspecies extrarius Schauberger. 

Gnafhaphanus philippensis (Chevrolat) 

Chevrolat 1841, Revue Zool., p. 221 {Amhhjgmi- 
thus). 

Chaudoir 1878, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 12, p. 511 
(as laeviceps Macleay). 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 
p. 1043 ( see for synon>my and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description. None required here; length 
c. 12-16 mm. 

Type(s). From "Manille" (Manila); in 
Hope Mus., O.xford (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m). May 1933 
(Cheesman); 3, Rouku, Morehead R., 
\Vest Papua, Apr. 1962 (W. W. Brandt. 
C.S.I.R.O.). 

Notes. Tliis species ranges from SE. Asia 
to Australia, east to Philippines, but is 
surprisingly scarce and perhaps localized 
ill New (hiinea. 

Genus DIAPHOROMERUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 18 1.), Hull. Soc. \at. Moscow Ifi, Part 

2, p. 402. 

1878, Ann. Mus. Civ. Ccnoa 12. p. 17(S. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caral)i(lae, llarpaliuar (i, 

p. 1044 (see lor additional rclerences ). 

DiaL!,nosi,s. See Key to Genera of llar- 
paJini of New Guinea. 

Description. None rtciuircd hen-. 

Type species. D. iridipennis ('haudoir, ol 
.Xustralia including ("ape York (CMiaudoir 
ISTS). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 43 



Generic distribution. Primarily Austra- 
lia, with species also on New Zealand, New 
Caledonia, New Guinea, the Molueeas 

(Amboina), and Timor, and with 2 New 
Guinean species extending to New Britain. 
Notes. Many species of this genus in 
Australia inhabit open Eucah/pius wood- 
land or grassland. The two species in New 
Guinea occur in rain-forested parts of the 
island, but I do not know their exact 
habitats. The New Guinean species of 
Diaphoromerus, like most Australian ones, 
are winged. 

Key to Species of Diaphoromerus of 
New Guinea 

1. Larger (8.5-10.5 mm); posterior angles of 
prothorax (narrowly) rounded (p. 43) ._. 
papuensis 

- Smaller (6.0-7.5 mm); posterior angles of 
prothorax obtusely angulate, scarcely blunted 
(p. 43) papuclhis 

Diaphoromerus papuensis (Macleay) 

Macleay 1876, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South 

Wales 1, p. 168 {Harpalu.s). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caral:)idae, Harpalinae 6, 

p. 1043 (Gnathaphanus). 
hasilewsktji Louwerens 1962, Tijdschrift voor Ent. 

105, p. 139 (Gnatluiplianus) (new synonymy). 

Description. None required here; length 
c. 9-10 mm. 

Types. Of papuensis, from Hall Sound, 
Papua; presumably in Macleay Mus., 
Sydney (not seen). Of basilewskyi, from 
Amboina Is., Moluccas, 70 m altitude 
(A. M. R. Wegner), at light; holotype in 
Louwerens Coll. (not seen), 2 paratypes 
now in M.C.Z. 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Common 
probably throughout New Guinea: 119, 
from widely scattered lowland localities, 
from Port Moresby and Dobodura to 
Manokwari, up to 1300 m at Wau, and (SOO 
m at Araucaria Camp, West N. G. Speci- 
mens collected in every month except 
August. 

Notes. Macleay 's statement that the 
third elytral interval is punctate on inner 
side before apex places this species in 
Diaphoromerus rather than Gnathaphanus, 



and the length (4y2 lines = 9 mm) is diag- 
nostic of this species in New Guinea. 
Closely related species in Australia prob- 
ably include mehnarius Dejean and iridi- 
pennis Chaudoir. D. papuensis occurs also 
in New Britain (Cape Gloucester, Dar- 
lington) and the Moluccas (types of 
basilewskyi) . 

Diaphoromerus papuellus n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 16, rather 
small, convex; brownish piceous, append- 
ages testaceous or brownish testaceous; 
moderately shining, ? scarcely duller, both 
sexes with reticulate microsculpture iso- 
diametric or slightly transverse on head, 
more transverse on pronotum and elytra. 
Head 0.69 and 0.69 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent; front weakly impressed; mentum 
toothed; ligula slightly shorter than para- 
glossae, latter separate at apex. Prothorax 
transverse-subquadrate; width/length 1.43 
and 1.44; base/apex 1.41 and 1.39; sides 
rounded anteriorly, nearly straight, con- 
verging, sometimes slightly sinuate before 
slightly obtuse but distinct and scarcely 
blunted basal angles; disc formed as usual, 
basal impressions sublinear, weak, mar- 
gined at base but not or indistinctly punc- 
tate. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.20 
and 1.19; sides slightly sinuate before apex; 
striae impressed; intervals slightly convex, 
subequal, 3rd 1 -punctate on inner side near 
apex. Inner wings full. Legs: 1st segment 
hind tarsi elongate. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: S front and middle tarsi dilated 
( 2nd and 3rd segments of front tarsi slightly 
wider than long, of middle tarsi narrower ) , 
with densely pubescent soles. Measure- 
ments: length 6.0-7.5; width 2.0-2.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (British Mus.) and 
6 paratypes (some in M.C.Z. , Type No. 
31,361) from Kokoda, Papua, 1200 ft. (366 
m), Aug. (except one specimen May) 1933 
(Cheesman); and additional paratypes as 
follows. Papua: 1, Kerema, May 3-9, 1959 
(C. D. Michener, Bishop Mus.); 2, Kiunga, 
Fly R., July 4-8, Aug. 8-10, 1957 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Rouku, Morehead 



44 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



R., West Papua, Apr. 1962 (W. W. Brandt, 
C.S.I.R.O.); 3, Yule Is. (Hungarian Na- 
tional Mus.); 39, "Papua" without further 
locality ( Hungarian National Mus. ) . West 
N. G.': 2, Merauke, Apr. 6, 1952 (L. D. 
Brongersma, Leiden Mus.); 1, same locality, 
Jan. 26-Feb. 10, 1960 (T. C. Maa, Bishop 
Mus.); 1, Kepi, Res. Mappi, Oct. 15, 1957 
(R. T. Simon Thomas, Louwerens Coll.); 
4, Wasian, Sept. 27, 1939 (R. G. Wind, 
California Acad.). Also 1 paratype, Koitaki, 
1500 ft. (455 m), New Guinea (diyision 
unknown), Oct.-Noy. 1928 (Pemberton, 
H.S.P.A.). 

Measured specimen.^. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Kokoda. 

Notes. I haye seen a specimen of this 
species from Kerayat, New Britain (E. J. 
Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.). 

This is eyidently a member of the 
Diuphoromerus austral is group. As com- 
pared with austral is itself, the present new 
species has better defined posterior pro- 
thoracic angles. In this character it agrees 
with D. aereus Dejean, of SW. Australia, 
but papueUus lacks the obyious punctation 
of the base of the pronotum of aereus. As 
compared with queen.slandicus Csiki (man- 
dihularis Castelnau), papueUus is larger, 
with more obtuse posterior prothoracic 
angles. 

Genus HYPHARPAX Macleay 

Macleay 1825, Annulosa Javanica 1, p. 22. 

Chaudoir 1878, Ann. Mus! Civ. Genoa 12, p. 496. 

Sloanc 1898, Proc. Liniican Snc. New South Wales 
23, pp. 458-159. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carahidae, Ilarpalinae 6, 
p. 1051 ( se(" lor s> ii()n\ni\' and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

D/V/ij/fo.s/.v. See preceding Key to Genera 
of llarpali)ii of New Guiiiea. 

Description. None required here. 

Type .species. //. lateralis Macleay ( = 
dentipes Wiedemann), of Jaya. 

Generic distribution. Chiefly Australia. 
extending to New Zealand, and west in the 
Malay Ar« •hijH'hi'io to Java and Sumatra. 

Notes. See Notes under following species. 



Hypharpax dentipes (Wiedemann) 

Wiedemann 1823, Zool. Magazin 2, p. 54 (Harpalus). 
Chaudoir 1878, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 12, p. 500. 
Andrewes 1919, Trans. Ent. Soe. London for 

1919, p. 158. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

6, p. 1052 (see for synonymy and additional 

references ) . 

Description. None required here. This 
is the only species of the genus known 
from New Guinea. Length c. 7-10 mm. 

Type. From Java; in Copenhagen Zool. 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 
39, Port Moresby and vie, May, Sept., 
Oct., Dec. (yarious collectors; M.C.Z., Brit- 
ish Mus., Bishop Mus., Dept. Agr. Pt. 
Moresby), some under logs in Eucalyptus 
country, some at light; 6, Yule Is., Nov. 7 
and 16, 1933 (R. V. Oldham, British Mus.); 
2, same locality (Fry Coll., British Mus.); 
1, Lake Daviumbu,' Fly R., Sept. 11-20, 
1936 (Archbold E.xp., A.M.N.H.); 1, Rouku. 
Morehead R., West Papua, Mar. 1962 (W. 
W. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). N-E. N. G.: 3, Lae 
and yic. Mar. 1963, Aug. 1964 (Sedlacek); 
18, Sum-Sum, 64 km N. of Wau, 580 m, 
Feb. 15, 1963 (H. W. Chssold, Bishop Mus.); 
4, Bulolo, 720 m, Aug. 13, 19, 24, 27, 1956 
(E. J. Ford, Jr., Bi.shop Mus.), 2 of these 
taken in light trap; 1, Wau, 1200 m. May 
1-15, 1962 (Sedlacek) in light trap. Also 
7 specimens from Papua, "British N. 
Guinea," and New Guinea without exact 
localities. 

Notes. The sexes of dentipes differ con- 
siderably: males not only have the front 
and middle tarsi dilated, with spongy soles, 
but also ha\e the hind femora more or less 
dentate and the hind tibiae more or l(\ss 
cur\'ed. The deyelopment of the femoral 
tooth and the degree of cur\ature of the 
tibiae xar)' indi\idually in males from sin- 
gle localities and also vary geographicalK", 
and the si/e of the insect varies geograph- 
icalK'. The species therefore has received 
several names. The synonymy has not been 
fully worked out, but my impression is 
that a single \ariabl(^ spcx'ies of Hypharpax, 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



45 



for which dentipes is the oldest name, oc- 
curs in Sumatra, Java, Celebes, and New 

Guinea, and that it occurs also in NE. 
Australia under the name kreffi Castelnau. 
This tentative conclusion should be tested 
by more rigorous study, for which I now 
have neither the material nor the time. 

In New Guinea this species has been 
found onlv in the eastern half of the island, 
especially but not exclusively in the more 
open Eucalyptus country of southern Papua. 

Genus LECANOMERUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1850, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 23, Part 1, 

p. 446. 
Sloane 1920, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

45, pp. 132, 137 (as synonym of Nemaf!,lossa). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Haipalinae 6, 

p. 1058 ( as synonym of Nemaglossa ) ( see for 

additional references ) . 
Thenarotes Bates 1878, Cistula Ent. 2, p. 319. 

Diagnosis. Small Harpalini ( length under 
5 mm in New Guinea); elytra without 
scutellar striae (in New Guinean species); 
penultimate segments labial palpi con- 
spicuously 2-setose; S front and middle 
tarsi with densely pubescent soles. 

Description (characters common to New 
Guinean species ) . Form c. as in Figures 17, 
IS; more compact and convex than in most 
Acupalpina, with margins of prothorax and 
elytra relatively narrow. Head: mandibles 
moderately long, straight posteriorly, curved 
apically; eyes not very large but almost 
contiguous with sides of mouth below; 
frontal impressions deep, curved, sharply 
defined; mentum with triangular tooth; 
ligula 2-setose, with paraglossae attached, 
longer than ligula; palpi short, apical seg- 
ments subconical, penultimate segments of 
labial palpi 2-setose. Prothorax subquadrate 
or subcordate; disc convex, median longi- 
tudinal line impressed, baso-lateral impres- 
sions shallow and poorly defined, surface 
of disc punctate across base, almost impunc- 
tate elsewhere. Elytra: humeri prominent; 
basal margin entire, rounded or obtusely 
subangulate at humeri; striae impressed, 
entire, not distinctly punctate; scutellar 



striae lacking; 3rd intervals 1-punctate on 
inner edge behind middle. Inner icings 
full. Lotcer surface including abdomen 
virtually glabrous except for "fixed" setae. 
Secondary sexual characters: i front and 
middle tarsi moderately dilated, with 
densely pubescent soles; 2 setae each side 
apex last ventral segment in both sexes. 

Type species. Of Lecanomerus, L. in- 
sidiosus Chaudoir, of SW. Australia; of 
Thenarotes, T. tasmanicus Bates, of Tas- 
mania. 

Generic distribution. Species of Lecano- 
merus (sensu lato) are diverse in Australia, 
less so in New Zealand, New Caledonia, 
and New Guinea. For further details see 
Notes, below. 

Notes. The supposed identity of Lecano- 
menis (including Thenarotes) of Australia 
and NemagJossa of Chile is doubtful. 
Sloane ( 1920 ) , who suggested it, did so 
without what would now be considered 
critical study, and I have not been able 
to make the comparisons necessary to con- 
firm it. I shall therefore tentatively treat 
Lecanomerus as distinct from NemagJossa 
and confined to the Australian Region. The 
genus does not have an "Antarctic" distribu- 
tion pattern. Species are numerous and 
diverse along the whole eastern edge of 
Australia north to Cape York. Five species 
are reported from Tasmania (Sloane), but 
4 of them occur on the Australian mainland 
too, and the 1 species endemic to Tasmania 
is not much differentiated. 

The 3 small, compact Lecanomerus found 
in New Guinea resemble, but are specifi- 
cally distinct from, certain unidentified 
species that I found common on the Cape 
York Peninsula of Australia in 1958. The 
New Guinean forms occur in rain-forest 
areas, not in Eucahjptus country. They 
probably live among dead leaves and under 
vegetation on the ground near standing 
water or perhaps sometimes in leaf litter on 
the floor of rain forest. However, I did not 
distinguish them in the field and cannot be 
sure of their habitats. 



46 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Key to Species of Lecanomervs of 
New Guinea 

1. Prothorax narrowly subcortlate ( width /length 
1.22 and 1.18); '(Hollandia, West N. G.) 

( p. 46 ) angustior 

- Prothorax wider; { Papna ) 2 

2. Brown: slightly narrower {cf. proportions in 
Description.^); piinetation of base of pronotnm 
discontinnous, with middle of base virtnalK' 
impnnctate (p. 46) incdius 

- Black; relatively sHghtly wider; punctation 
somewhat irregular but c. continuous across 
base of pronotnm (p. 46) latior 

Lecanomerus angustior n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
fomi (Fig. 17) narrowly compact; color 
brownish piceous, prothoracic and elytral 
margins and suture usually slightly rules- 
cent, appendages testaceous; moderately 
shining, reticulate microsculpture faint, 
slightly transverse on front and on pronotal 
disc, more transverse on elytra. Head 0.69 
and 0.69 width prothorax; eyes smaller than 
average, genae slightly rounded-oblique. 
Prothorax: width length 1.22 and 1.18; 
base apex 1.13 and 1.15; sides weakly 
rounded anteriorly, converging and usually 
sinuate posteriorly before c. right posterior 
angles; base and apex unmargined at least 
at middle; base of pronotum punctate at 
sides, scarcely so at middle. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.47 and 1.45. Measure- 
ments: length 3.6-4.0; width 1.6-1.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,362) and 6 paratypes all from Hollandia, 
West N. G., July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 

Meamired specimens. The .', holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. See preceding Key to S))ecies for 
diilerential characters. This is the western- 
most known species ol the genus. It prob- 
ably represents medius (below) ol eastern 
New Guinea. Perhaps additional related 
forms are still to be found in western West 
N. G. 

Lecanomerus medius n. sp. 

Description. With charactc-rs of genus; 
form average; color brownish i)ice()us, mar- 
gins of jirothorax and elytra slighth' or not 



rufescent, appendages testaceous, antennae 
slightly browner except at base; shining, 
reticulate microsculpture faintly indicated, 
meshes scarcely distinct at 50 X. Head 
0.64 and 0.65 width prothorax; eyes mod- 
erate, genae short, rounded. Prothorax: 
width length 1.34 and 1.34; base apex 1.26 
and 1.27; sides broadly rounded except 
nearly straight and converging posteriorly 
to obtuse but finely denticulate posterior 
angles; base and apex unmargined at least 
at middle; base punctate at sides, not at 
middle. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.36 and 1.34; humeri broadh' rounded. 
Secondary .sexual characters as for genus. 
Measurements: length 3.5-4.3; width 1.6- 
1.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 

31.363) and 20 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington), and 
9 paratypes, Oro Bay, near Dobodura, Dec. 
1943-Jan. 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. See Notes under preceding and 
following species. 

Lecanomerus latior n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 18 ) compact, relati\ely broad; 
black, appendages brownish testaceous; 
shining, c. without reticulate microsculpture. 
Head 0.68 and 0.67 width prothorax; eyes 
slightly larger than in nwdius (above), 
genae short, forming c. right angles with 
neck. Prothorax: width length 1.36 and 
1.39; base apex 1.24 and 1.16; sides broadl\- 
rounded except c. straight and conxerging 
posteriorly to obtuse but minutel\ dentic- 
ulate posterior angles; apex margined but 
marginal line sometimes laint at middle; 
base not margined; entire base ol pionotum 
punctate, but punctures sparser at middle 
ol base. Elytra: width el\tra prothorax 
1.44 and 1.38; humeri obtuseK' sometimes 
vagueK- subangulate. Measurements: length 
3.6-3.7; width 1.6-1.7 mm. 

Tyj)es. Holotype 6 (M.C.Z., Type No. 

31.364) and 1 9 paratope from l^obodura. 



The Carabid Beetles of Ne\\' Guinea • Darlington 47 



Papua, Mar -July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes from Papua as fol- 
lows: 1, Bisianumu, near Sogeri, 500 ni. 
Mar. 15-20, 1955 (E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.), 
taken in rain forest; 1, Kokoda, 1200 ft. 
( 366 m ) , Aug. 1933 ( Cheesman ) . 

Measured speeimens. The 6 holotype and 
$ paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. Distinguished from the 2 pre- 
ceding species by broader form, black 
color, and pronotum with entire apical 
marginal line and more extensive basal 
punctation. 

Genus CHYDAEUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1854, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 27, Part 1, 

p. 343. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 

p. 1080. 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Harpalini 
of New Guinea. 

Description. None required here. 

Tijpe species. C. obscurus Chaudoir, of 
India. 

Generic distribution. Tlie Himalayas 
(Sikkim, etc.), Formosa, Sumatra, Java, 
the Philippines, and New Guinea; usually 
at high altitudes. 

Notes. This is the clearest case I know of 
an Asiatic stock of Carabidae that has 
"mountain hopped" to New Guinea. All 
species of the genus are generally similar 
and probably closely allied. The wings of 
some species have atrophied, but those of 
others are still fully developed, and C. 
bakeri Andrewes is dimorphically winged 
at Baguio on Luzon. Flying individuals 
may therefore have dispersed from moun- 
taintop to mountaintop and from island 
to island across the Malay Archipelago 
rather recently, in terms of evolutionary 
time. 

Chydaeus papua n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 19, stout, 
convex; black, legs brownish, antennae and 
mouthparts irregularly brownish testaceous; 
both sexes moderately shining, upper sur- 
face irregularly punctulate but reticulate 



microsculpture faint or absent. Head 0.76 
and 0.74 width prothorax, c. as in Chydaeus 
obscurus Chaudoir; mentum toothed; ligula 
free at apex, truncate; paraglossae arcuate, 
narrow, c. long as ligula but widely sepa- 
rated from it. Prothorax broadly subcordate; 
width/length 1.48 and 1.49; base apex 1.12 
and 1.09; sides broadly rounded through 
much of length, sinuate before well defined 
c. right posterior angles; pronotum strongly 
convex (more so than in obscurus), base 
margined, basal impressions poorly de- 
fined, surface of disc more closely and 
coarsely punctate at sides and especially 
base than at middle. Ehjtra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.21 and 1.25; humeri subdentate; 
apices weakly sinuate; striae entire, rather 
lightly impressed; 3rd intervals without 
dorsal punctures. Inner wings vestigial. 
Lower surface and legs without obvious 
special characters. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: S front tarsi moderatelv and middle 
tarsi narrowly dilated, densely squamulose 
below; 6 with 1, 9 2 setae each side last 
ventral segment. Measurements: length 
9.2-10.6; width 3.6-4.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,365) and 6 paratypes from Mt. Wilhelm, 
Bismarck Rge., N-E. N. G., above 10,000 
ft. (above 3000 m), Oct. 1944 (Darlington), 
in open country above timberline; and 
additional paratypes as follows, all from 
the Bismarck Rge.: 2, Mt. Wilhelm, 2800- 
2900 m, July 6, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, "No. 5," 
Piunde-Aude Camp, east slopes Mt. Wil- 
helm, June 13, 1959 ( L. J. Brass, Sixth 
Archbold Exp. to Papua, A.M.N.H.); 1, 
Lake Aunde, 3400-3500 m, July 4, 1963 
(Sedlacek); 1, Lake Sirunki, 2800-2900 m, 
June 15, 1963 (Sedlacek); 6, Mt. Otto Sum- 
mit, Nov. 1965 ( Dept. Agr. Port Moresby ) . 

Additional material. One, Murray Pass, 
Papua, 2400-2800 m, Nov. 6, 1965 (Sed- 
laceks); 1 i , Camp E. of Mt. Wilhelmina, 
Snow Mts., West N. G., 3600 m, Sept. 1938 
( Toxopeus ) . 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 ? paratype from Mt. Wilhelm. 



48 BuUctin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Notes. This geographically isolated Chy- 
daeus is similar to obscurtis Chaudoir (of 
Sikkini, etc.) but has a slightly wider head 
and differs in other details. 

The Snow Mts. specimen may represent 
an independent population, distinguished 
by wider prothorax and perhaps by other 
characters, but more material is necessary 
to decide this. 

Genus PLATYMETOPUS Dejean 

Dejean 1929, Species General Coleop. 4, p. 68. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Ilaipalinae 6, 
p. 1205 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Schanberger 1938, Arl^eiten niorphologische nnd 
taxonomische Ent. 5, p. 41 (see for comments 
on some species of the Malay Archipelago ) . 

Basilewskv 1950, Ann. Mus. Congo Bcfge (8), 
Zool.. 6. p. 141. 

Dkiii,nosis. Medium-sized, dull black Ilar- 
palini distinguished from all other members 
of the tribe in New Guinea by dorsal surface 
entirely coarsely punctate and pubescent. 

Description. None required here. 

Tij))c -species. P. vestitus Dejean, of 
Africa. 

Generic distribution. Africa, the Cape 
Verde Islands, and Madagjascar; SE. Asia, 
Japan, and the Malay Archipelago to the 
Philippines and New (iuinea (not Aus- 
tralia ) . 

Notes. A single widely distributed species 
of this genus reaches New Guinea. 

Plafymetopus iaficeps Dejean 

Dejean 1829, Species Ceneral Coleop. 4, p. 70. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., (^aral)idae, Ilarpalinae 0, 

p. 1200 (see tor additional rcterenccs and for 

"varieties" ) . 

Description. None re([uired here. See 
DiciiS.nosis of genus. Length r. 8 mm. 

Type(s). From the Philippines; in 
Obcrthiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Netv Guinea. Gollectcnl 
only in the western part of West N. (i.: 
4, Biak Is., dates in Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr. 
1952 (L. 1). Bronger.sma, Leiden Mus.), at 
light; 2, Wong R., Feb. 9, 1957 ( 1{. T. Simon 
Thomas, Louwerens Coll.), at liirht; 1, 



Sorong-Doom, Feb. 9, 1957 (R. T. Simon 
Thomas, Louwerens Coll.), at light. 

Notes. Closely related fomis of this 
genus, some treated as varieties of Platy- 
metopus jlaiiJahris (Fabricius) by Csiki, 
are widely distributed in SE. Asia and the 
Malay Archipelago. Their taxonomy is a 
problem. The problem, however, lies mainly 
in the Oriental Region rather than New 
Guinea, and I cannot undertake to solve it 
now. 

Whatever the final taxonomic arrange- 
ment, it seems clear that one, dark-legged 
form of Phitymetopus (all surely New 
Guinean individuals are dark-legged ) has 
reached New Guinea recently from the 
west and may perhaps still be confined to 
the western end of the island. Its absence 
elsewhere in New Guinea is suggested by 
the facts that members of this genus are 
usually common where they occur at all 
and that they fly to light, but that none 
has been found in light trap material from 
central and eastern New Guinea. P. hiti- 
ceps has been prexiously known from Bnrn 
( specimen in Andrewes Coll. ) and the 
Philippines. 

Besides the dark-legged indixiduals re- 
corded above, I have seen two yellow- 
legged ones labeled "Dor)" and "Dorey." 
They were probabK' collected by Wallace 
and are presumably really from ('elebes 
(see Part I of the present work, pp. 330- 
331). They arv probably referable to P. 
sidjrugosus Schanberger (see reference cited 
under genus, above ) of Celebes. This 
species should not be listed from New 
Guinea. 

Genus TRICHOTICHNUS Morawitz 

Nh)ra\vil/. 1803, Mem. Acad. Sci. St. Petersburg 
(7) 0, No. 3, p. 03. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. (>at., C^araliidac, Ilarpalinae 
0, pp. 1210, 1217 (see for additional refer- 
ences, subgenera, and synonx'nn). 

l^asilcwskx 1950, .\nii. Mus. C'ongo Beige, Zool. 
0, p. 87. 

Di(iii,nosis. See Key to Gei\era of IlarpaJini 
of New Gui)u'(i. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



49 



Description ( important characters shared 
liy New Guinean species). Form of or- 
dinary, medium-sized Harpalini; upper sur- 
face not pubescent. Head smooth except 
for deep, obhque, usually linear frontal 
impressions; 1 seta over each eye; mentum 
toothed; labial palpi with penultimate seg- 
ments with more than 2 setae. Prothoiox 
subcordate or transverse; side margins each 
with 1 seta-bearing puncture, before mid- 
dle; disc usually extensively punctate espe- 
cially across base, with punctation finer and 
usually sparser across middle. Elytra with 
striae entire, impressed, impunctate; 3rd in- 
tervals 1-punctate near inner edge at or 
slightly behind middle ( punctures some- 
times obscured or absent on one or both 
elytra). Inner wings usually full, rarely 
dimorphic (some populations of nigricans 
and altiis). Lower sw^acc: prosternum 
anteriorly with short pubescence (reduced 
in mcdiiis). Legs: front tibiae with apex 
less than Vi wide as tibial length; hind 
tarsi moderate or long. Secondary sexual 
characters: 6 front and usually middle tarsi 
2-seriately squamulose; 2 setae each side 
last ventral segment in both sexes. See also 
Notes, below. 

Type species. T. longitarsis Morawitz, of 
Japan. 

Generic distribution. Temperate and 
tropical Eurasia and the Malay Archipel- 
ago to New Guinea, etc. (probably not 
Australia); eastern North America. The 
genus in a broad sense, including Hyparpa- 
his, occurs also in Africa (Csiki, probably 
following Schauberger), but Basilewsky con- 
siders llyparpalus a separate genus and 
does not recognize Trichotichnus in Africa 
south of the Sahara. 

Notes. I have had difficulty with both 
the generic and the specific classifications 
of the 15 New Guinean species that I now 
assign to this genus. Several of the species 
might go in Lampetes {Lamprophonus) or 
Carbanus, but I have not found satisfactory 
characters to distinguish these genera from 
Trichotichnus. However, I do not intend to 



reduce them to synonymy now. They need 
further study based on Oriental as well as 
New Guinean forms. This study will re- 
quire more time and material than I now 
have. 

The descriptions of species in the follow- 
ing pages are brief, and allowance must be 
made for individual variation, which is 
surprisingly great in some characters. For 
example, the punctation of the outer elytral 
intervals is variable in some cases (e.g., in 
mixtus). The form of the elytral apices is 
sometimes variable (e.g., in denarius and 
altus). And the form of the apex of the 
aedeagus is surprisingly variable in some 
species. I have figured it in some cases 
but have usually not used it as a diagnostic 
character. But see under alius and dux 
(Figs. 172, 173). 

All New Guinean species of Trichotichnus 
are fully winged and probably capable of 
flight (some of them have been taken in 
light traps ), with 2 exceptions. T. nigricans, 
although apparently always fully winged 
at low altitudes, is dimorphically winged 
on the Bismarck Range. And some pop- 
ulations of T. alius include individuals with 
slightly shortened and weakened wings, al- 
though other individuals of this species fly. 
Some Trichotichnus in other parts of the 
world have atrophied or dimorphic wings. 

Most or all of the common, unspotted 
Trichotichnus in New Guinea probably live 
on the ground in rain forest, but I did not 
distinguish the different species in the field 
and cannot be sure of their exact habitats. 

The following Key to Species of Tri- 
chotichnus of New Guinea works reason- 
ably well for series of clean specimens, but 
it is not perfect. I myself have had trouble 
placing some single specimens. In order to 
simplify identifications and reduce need for 
using the key, I give the following notes for 
recognizing several of the commoner, dark 
( unmarked ) species. 

If large (7.3-S.3 mm), rufo-piceous, 
shining, and without pubescence at front of 
prosternum (but some setae at apex of 



50 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



prosternal process ) : see Lyter, second 
genus after TrichoticJinus. 

If large (8-9 mm), broad, and with 
paiiiol raised 10th intervals in elytral mar- 
'j^ins: denarius. 

If large ( c. 8-10 mm ) , less broad, with- 
out raised 10th intervals, and found at con- 
siderable elevations in mountains (usually 
over 1200 m ) : probably altus. 

If small ( 6.5-7.5 mm ) , dark, and without 
reticulate microsculpture on elytral inter- 
vals: probably nigricans. 

If small (6.3-7.0 mm), dark, and with 
reticulate microsculpture on elytral inter- 
vals: probably semimas (which lacks 
squamules on 6 middle tarsi ) . 

Key to Species of Trichotichnus of 
New Guinea 

1. Head c. % width prothorax (H/P 0.66 and 
0.68); prothorax transverse with broadly 
rounded sides; length 5.0-6.3 mm (p. 

50 ) siraneoi 

- Head c. % or more width prothorax (by 
measurement); prothorax more subcordate; 
usually larger 2 

2. Elytra with partial raised 10th intervals in 
marginal channels; (no dorsal markings; 
length 8-9 mm) (p. 51) denarhi.s 

- Elytra without partial raised 10th inter- 
vals 3 

3. Male with only anterior (not middle) 
tarsi squamulose; elytral intervals micro- 
reticulate; ( no dorsal markings; length 6.3- 
7.0 mm) (p. .52) .semimas 

- Male with middle as well as anterior tarsi 
with sf|uamides; elytra often (not always) 
without microrcticuhition 4 

4. Elytra without subapical sutural spot or 
sutural intervals pale 5 

- Elytra with eonnnon subapical sutural spot 
pale, or sutural intervals pale near apex 11 

5. Prothorax and elytra without pale margins; 
abdomen usually without (•(>)is))icu()us pale 
spots or margins; femora not coii.s))icuotisly 
paler than abdomen 6 

- Protliorax and elytra usually with narrow 
pale margins; abdomen usually with con- 
spicuous pale lateral spots or margins; 
femora conspicnotisUi pale 10 

6. Length 6. .5-7. 5 mm; pronotum not iiiucli 
depressed at sides toward base; (basal 
margin of pronotum usually incomplete) 
(p. 52) )u^iic(nis 

- Larger, or sides of pronotum more de- 
pressed toward base 7 



7. Eyes slightly larger, separated from mouth 
below by c. '/s diameter of an eye; apex 
of aedeagus short; (length c. 8-10 mm) 

(p. 53) modiLs 

- Eyes slightly smaller, more distant from 
mouth below; apex of aedeagus longer, 
slender 8 

8. Length lL.5-13.0 nun (p. ,53) dii.x 

- Length 7.2-10.0 mm 9 

9. Prosternal pubescence more abundant; size 
usually larger (c. 8-10 mm); pronotum 
more punctate, less shining (p. 54) _ (dtus 

- Prosternal pui^escence usualK' scanty, but 
variable; size usually smaller (7.2-8.5 
mm); pronotum less punctate, more shining; 
(direct comparison necessary to determine 
some specimens) (p. 55) mediii.s 

10. Elytral intervals not obviously microreticu- 
late; abdomen with pale spots usually 
largest and most conspicuous at sides of 
subapical segment; (length 8.3-9.3 mm) 
(p. .56) hrcnidti 

- Elytral intervals microreticulate; abdomen 
usually more extensively pale margined; 
(length 8..5-9.4 mm) (p. .56) ohscurus 

11. Length usually 7.6-8.5 mm ( rarely slightly 
smaller); subapical sutural pale spot dis- 
tinct, reaching 3rd intervals (p. 57) _ 
guttuhi 

- Smaller; sutural pale spot \ariable, some- 
times smaller or less distinct 12 

12. Prothorax wide at base ( base, ape.\ 1.34); 
(length 7.5 nun) (p. 57) mongi 

- Prothorax narrower at base 13 

13. Sides of elytra (intervals 8, 9) rugose- 
punctate; (length 5.3-6.8 mm) (p. 58) __ 
semirugosiis 

- Sides of elytra not rugose, although some- 
times punctulate 14 

14. Length 5.8-7.5 mm; pronotum depressed 
at sides toward base; ( and see Notes under 
this species) (p. 58) mixtu.s 

- Length .5. .3-5. 8 mm; sides of pronotum 
scarcely deprcssi'd (p. 59) dclicatu.s 

Trichotichnus sfraneoi (Louwerens) 

Louwercus 1962, Tijdschrift \c)or Ent. 105, p. 1 12, 
iig. 7 {C(irhanu.s). 

Dc.scri))lion. With charactt^rs of genus; 
small, form (Fig. 20) broad; brownish 
black, sides ol piouotum and c']\ tr;i \aguely 
translucent, lower snrlacc and appendages 
more rufous; elytr;i fainth- iridescent but 
not distinctK' microreticulate (at 50x). 
Head small, 0.66 and 0.68 width prothorax; 
eyes ku-gc. s('p;uated from month below b\ 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



51 



c. ^i-j or less width of an eye. PiotJiomx 
transverse with broadly rounded sides; 
width length 1.59 and 1.59; base/apex 1.41 
and 1.39. Elytra: width elytra prothorax — 
and 1.30. Secondary sexual characters nor- 
mal for Trichotichnus. Measurements (in 
New Guinea ) : length c. 5.0-6.3; width c. 
2.3-2.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Louwerens Coll.), 
allotype, 6 paratypes all from Amboina Is- 
land^ Moluccas, 70 m (A. M. R. Wegner), 
at light; a paratype now in M.C.Z. (Type 
No. 31,149) (holotype not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 3, 
Brown R., May 21, 23, 24, 1956 ( E. J. 
Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.); 1, Mts. between 
Agamoia and Ailuluai, Ferguson Is., 900 m, 
"No. 4," June 5-17, 1956 (L. J. Brass, 
U.S.N.M.). N-E. N. G.: 13, Wau, Morobe 
Dist., 1200, 1300 m, various dates (Sedla- 
cek); 1, Wantoat, Finisterre Mts., 4000 ft. 
(1220 m), Sept. 9, 1957 (Monroe and 
Holland, Canadian Nat. Coll.); 1, Elipta- 
min Vy., 1350-1665 m, June 23-30, 1959 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). West 
N. G.: 1, Hollandia, July-Sept. 1944 (Dar- 
lington); 1, Cyclops Mts., Sabron, 2000 ft. 
(610 m), June 1936 (Cheesman); 1, Hol- 
landia area, W. Sentani, Cyclops Mts., 50- 
100 m, June 22-24, 1959 (Gressitt & T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.), in light trap; 2, Star 
Rge., Sibil, 1260 m, May 16, June 16, 1959 
(Leiden Mus.), at Hght. 

Measured .specimens. A pair ( i 9 ) from 
Brown R. 

Notes. Andrewes placed Carhanus in the 
wrong subtribe of Harpalini, erroneously 
considering it a member of the Acupalpina. 
The arrangement of setae on the labial palpi 
seems to me to place it with the Haipalina, 
and I can find no positive character to 
distinguish it from Trichotichnus. How- 
ever, I do not intend to synonymize Car- 
hanus now. It requires further study. The 
name can be used for a group of small, 
mutually similar species (lautus Andrewes 
of Burma, flavipes Andrewes of Java, 
pliilippinus Jedlicka of the Philippines, and 
straneoi Louwerens of the Moluccas, New 



Guinea, etc. ) that may eventually be sepa- 
rated from Trichotichnus. 

T. straneoi extends to New Britain and 
New Ireland (specimens in Bishop Mus.). 
Nothing is recorded of its habitat or habits 
except that it flies to light. 

Trichotichnus denarius n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slightly broader than usual; black or 
piceous, appendages browner, sides of ab- 
domen with small pale marks (variable); 
rather shining, most of upper surface with- 
out visible microreticulation (at 50x ) but 
elytra silky in some lights. Head 0.77 and 
0.77 width prothorax; eyes large, separated 
from mouth below by e. ^o diameter of 
an eye. Frothorax transverse-subcordate; 
width/length 1.59 and 1.63; base/apex 1.14 
and 1.10; sides converging and usually 
broadly and slightly sinuate before distinct 
but obtuse posterior angles; basal marginal 
line fine or interrupted at middle; disc 
weakly convex, moderately depressed at 
sides especially posteriorly, extensively 
punctate but with punctation finer and 
slightly sparser at middle. Ehjtra broad; 
width elytra/prothorax 1.36 and 1.36; mar- 
ginal gutters wider than usual, with ir- 
regular raised 10th intervals in c. middle 
V3 of length; apices usually slightly dehis- 
cent and c. pointed, but variable; outer 
intervals (8, 9, and 10) usually slightly, 
finely punctulate. Secondary sexual char- 
acters as for genus. Measurements: length 
c. 8.0-9.0; width 3.3-3.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,366) and 111 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 
20, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m), June, July, 
Aug., Sept., Oct. 1933 (Cheesman); 1, same 
locality, Mar. 28-29, 1956 (Gressitt); 2, 
Biniguni, Gwariu R., 150 m, "No. 3," July 
27-Aug. 14, 1953 (Geoffrev M. Tate, 
A.M.N.H.); 5, Peria Ck., Kwagira R., 50 m, 
"No. 7," Aug. 14-Sept. 6, 1953 (Geoffrey 
M. Tate, A.M.N.H.); 1, Kokoda-Pitoki, 400 
m, Mar. 23, 1956 (Gressitt). N-E. N. G.: 



52 BiiUefin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



3, lower Busu R., Huon Pen., May 4, 1955 
(E. O. ^^'ilson, M.C.Z.), in lowland rain 
forest; 1, Simbang, Huon Gulf, 1899 (Biro). 
West N. G.: 1, Wamoro (ex Coll. G. 
Hauser, British Mus.). 

Measured .speeimens. The c5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. The partial 10th intervals in the 
elytral margins immediately distinguish 
denarius. The species is very common in 
eastern New Guinea ( apparently much 
less so in the west), presumably in ram 
forest. One of Miss Cheesmans specimens 
was taken at light and so apparently were 
the Peria Creek individuals, which have 
scales and wing fragments of other insects 
on them. 

Trichofichnus semimas n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form rather slender; black or piceous, ap- 
pendages brown, abdomen with some ( vari- 
able) small pale marks at sides; moderately 
shining but elytra with transverse micro- 
reticulation distinct at 50x. Head 0.79 and 
0.79 width prothorax; eyes moderate, sepa- 
rated from mouth below by nearly % diam- 
eter of an eye. Prothorax subcordate; 
width length 1.48 and 1.48; base/apex 1.18 
and 1.16; sides rounded anteriorly, con- 
verging and sinuate before distinct c. right 
(slightly obtuse) posterior angles; basal 
marginal line faint or interrupted at middle; 
disc very little depressed at sides toward 
base, extensively punctate except almost 
impunctate at middle. Ehjlra normal; 
width elytra prothorax 1.23 and 1.26; outer 
intervals not distinct])' punctulate. Second- 
ary sexual characters normal except only 
front (not middle) tarsi of 6 scjuamulose. 
Measurements: length 6.3-7.0; width 2.5- 
2.8 mm. 

Tijpes. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,367) and 19 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Pajma, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 4 
paratypes, Kokoda, Papua, 1200 ft. (366 
m), Oct., Sept. 1933 (Cheesman); 3 para- 
types, same locality. Mar. 20, 28-29, 1956 
(Gressitt), in light trap; 2, Xormanb) Is., 



W'akaiuna, Sewa Bav, Nov. 1-10, 1956 and 
Jan. 1-8, 1957 (W. \\'. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 1, Erima, Astrolabe 
Bav, 1896 (Biro); 2, Madang ("Friedrich- 
\^m.-hafen"), 1901 (Biro); 1, Bulolo, 730 
m, Aug. 27, 1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop 
Mus.), in light trap; 1, Sum-Sum, 64 km N. 
of Wan, 580 m, Feb. 15, 1963 (Sedlacek). 
West N. G. : 4, Hollandia area, W. Sentani, 
Cyclops Mts., 50-100, 100, 150-250 m, June 
(various dates) 1959 (Gressitt and T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.); 2, Ifar, Cyclops Mts., 
450-500, 400-800 m, Sept. 7,' 7-9, 1962 
( Sedlacek ) ; 3, Dojo, Res. Hollandia, Apr. 
1957, 1958 (R. T. Simon Thomas, in Lou- 
werens Coll.); 1, Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 
(E. S. Ross, California Acad.); 1, Wasian, 
Vogelkop, Sept. 1939 (Wind. M.C.Z.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. Males of semimas are imique 
among New Guinean Trichofichnus in 
lacking the usual sexual squamules of the 
middle tarsi. Fc^nales resemble nii^ricans 
( below ) but differ by presence of reticuhite 
microsculpture on the elytra. T. semimas 
probably lives in rain forest, and has been 
taken at light near Hollandia as wi-ll as at 
Kokoda. 

Trichofichnus nigricans Schauberger 

SLlianhermT 1935, Eiit. An/.cimT 15, p. 34. 

De.ivription. \\'ith characters of genus; 
form rather small and slender; black, 
appendages brownish, sides of abdomen 
with or without small, often vague pale 
marks; upper surlace including elytra with- 
out distinct reticulate microsculpture. Head 
0.76 and 0.75 width jirothorax; eyes usually 
moderati- and separated Irom mouth below 
by c. ':. diam(4er ol an c\c. but e\"es smaller 
and more distant Irom mouth in short- 
wing(>d indi\iduals hom Bismarck Range. 
Prothorax subcordate. with sides slightK 
or not sinuate belore usnalK well defined 
but obtuse basal angles; width IcMigth 1.43 
and 1.49; base apex 1. 2 1 and 148; basal 
inaruinal line usualK ineomplete at middle; 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



53 



disc only slightly depressed at sides basally, 
extensively punctate, punctation finer and 
sparser at middle. Elytra nomial; width 
elytra prothorax 1.27 and 1.25; outer inter- 
vals not distinctly punctulate. \V/ng.s full 
in lowland populations, dimorphic on Bis- 
marck Range (see Notes, below). Second- 
ary sexual characters normal. Measure- 
ments: length c. 6.5-7.5; width c. 2.5-2.8 
mm. 

Types. (Holo)type (Andrewes Coll., 
British Mus.) and 2 "cotypes" all from 
Sattelberg, N-E. N. G. (G. Hauser). I saw 
the type in London in 1948 and made a 
satisfactory comparison with it. 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Common 
and widely distributed: 180 specimens 
from localities well distributed over New 
Guinea and on Woodlark and Nonnanby 
Is.; most from low altitudes, but series from 
Chimbu Vy., Bismarck Rge., between 5000 
and 7000 ft. (c. 1500-2100 m), and from 
Wau, 1200 m. Specimens taken in every 
month. 

Measured specimens. A pair { $ 9 ) from 
Dobodura, Papua. 

Notes. T. nigricans occurs also on New 
Britain, and related fonns, compared by 
Schauberger (1935, p. 36), are known from 
Java, Sumatra, and Celebes. 

This species probably occurs in rain 
forest, although the Chimbu specimens 
were taken in open country. 

I have not examined the \\'ings of every 
specimen, but all or most of those from low 
altitudes are winged, and they often fly. 
They have been taken in light traps at 
several localities. However, of my Chimbu 
series, only 3 specimens (both sexes) have 
full wings, and 11 (both sexes) have the 
wings reduced to thin strips c. % as long 
as the elytra. I have not examined the 
wings of the 41 specimens from Wau be- 
cause some or all were collected in light 
traps, which would select only winged in- 
dividuals. 

Besides the 180 specimens that I assign 
to this species without much doubt, 7 
specimens from various localities in New 



Guinea are assigned doubtfully, because of 
slight differences in various characters. 

Trichotichnus modus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 21 ) average, somewhat variable 
( see proportions ) ; black, legs brownish, ab- 
domen ± brownish (apical segment darker) 
with lateral pale areas absent or not sharply 
defined; shining, elytra subiridescent but 
without visible reticulate microsculpture. 
Head 0.72 and 0.76 width prothorax; eyes 
slightly larger than usual, separated from 
mouth below by c. Vs diameter of an eye. Pro- 
thorax transverse-subcordate; width/length 
1.43 and 1.53; base/apex 1.30 and 1.20; 
sides rounded anteriorly, converging and 
usually slightly sinuate before well defined 
but obtuse posterior angles; basal marginal 
line faint or incomplete at middle; disc 
moderately depressed at sides, extensively 
punctate except c. impunctate at middle. 
Elytra: width elytra /prothorax 1.32 and 
1.36; marginal channels narrow, without 
10th intervals; outer intervals not distinctly 
punctulate. Secondary sexual characters 
normal; apex aedeagus short, ± hooked 
dorsally. Measurements: length 8.0-10.0; 
width 3.4-3.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,368) and 6 paratypes all from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 

Additional material. Papua: 1, Nor- 
manby Is., Wakaiuna, Sewa Bay, Jan. 1-8, 
1957 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). West 
N. G.: 1, Wissel Lakes, Tage L., 1760 
m, Aug. 4, 1955 (Gressitt). These speci- 
mens are assigned to modus doubtfully. 

Measured specimens. The c5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. This species resembles denarius 
in size and color, but differs by lack of 
partial 10th elytral intervals. 

Trichotichnus dux n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
fonn c. average, very large; black, append- 
ages dark brown, abdomen without distinct 
pale areas; upper surface finely micro- 
reticulate, meshes c. isodiametric on head, 



54 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol 137, No. 1 



increasingly transverse on pronotum and 
elytra. Head 0.76 and 0.77 width prothorax; 
eyes separated from mouth below by c. 
% width of an eye (but eyes more deeply 
covered than usual ^^'ith transparent win- 
dow-like material so edges not precisely 
defined). Fiothorax subcordate; width/ 
length 1.41 and 1.46; base/apex 1.19 and 
1.23; sides rounded anteriorly, converging 
and straight or slightly sinuate before well 
defined but obtuse posterior angles; basal 
and apical marginal lines usually faint or 
interrupted at middle; disc moderately de- 
pressed at sides posteriorly, finely but ex- 
tensively punctate or punctulate, the punc- 
tation strongest basally. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.39 and 1.30; margins 
narrow; outer intervals not distinctly punc- 
tulate. Inner icings full (see following 
Notes). Secondary .sexual characters nor- 
mal; apex aedeagus as in Figure 173. Mea- 
.mrements: length 11.5-13.0; width 4.4- 
5.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) and 
4 paratvpes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,369), 
from Edie Creek, 14 km S^^^ of Wau, N-E. 
N. G., 1900 and 2000 m, Oct. 4-10, 1961, 
and Feb. 13, 1962 (Sedlacek). Additional 
paratypes from N-E. N. G.: 3, Wau, 1700, 
2400 m, Jan. 9-12, Oct. 6, 1962 ( Sedlacek ) ; 
6, Kepilam, 2400 and 2500 m, June 21, 20- 
22, 21-23, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Tambul, 2200 
m, May 27-June 7, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, 
Laiagam, W. Highlands, Mar. 23, 1960 (J. 
H. Barrett, Dept. Agr. Port Moresby), at 
light; 1, Moke, Okapa Subd(istrict), E. 
Ibghlands, 6400 ft. ( 1950 m), Apr. 17, 1962 
(J. II. Barrett, Dept. Agr. Port Moresby). 
2, Okapa, June 12, 1964, Jan. 10, 1965 
(Hornabrook). 

Mea.surcd specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Edie Creek. 

Notes. The large size distinguishes this 
species from all odiers of the genus in New 
Guinea. All specimens of the type series 
are fully winged, but most were taken in 
light traps which, of course, select winged 
individuals. 



Trichotichnus alius n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form of c. average large New Guinean 
Trichotichnu.s; black or piceous, appendages 
dark brownish, sides of abdomen with in- 
distinct or poorly defined (variable) pale 
areas; moderately shining, elytra with trans- 
verse microreticulation faintly or not visible 
at 50x. Head 0.76 and 0.75 width prothorax; 
eyes separated from sides of mouth below 
by c. % width of an eye. Prothorax sub- 
cordate; width length 1.40 and 1.50; base 
apex 1.15 and 1.18; sides converging and 
straight or slightly sinuate before well de- 
fined but obtuse posterior angles; disc mod- 
erately depressed at sides posteriorly, vari- 
ably but often extensively punctate, most 
conspicuously so across base and least so 
across middle; basal marginal line entire, 
faint, or interrupted at middle (variable). 
Ehjtra: width elytra prothorax 1.25 and 
1.31; margins narrow, without 10th inter- 
vals; apices pointed or blunted (variable); 
outer intervals not distinctly punctulate. 
Inner wings dimorphic on the Bismarck 
Range (type series), full and strong in 
some individuals, slightly shortened (but 
still folded at apex) and with slightly 
weakened venation in other indixiduals. 
Secondary sexual characters normal; i cop- 
ulatory organs as in Figure 172. Measure- 
mcnts: length 8.0-10.3; width 3.3-3.9 mm. 
Types. Holotype 6 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31370) and 42 paratvpes from Chimbu 
Vy., Bismarck Rge., N-E. N. G., 5000-7500 
ft. (c. 1500-2300 m), Oct. 1944 (Darling- 
ton); and 16 paratypes, Tomba, S. .slope of 
Mt. Ilagen (Bismarck Rge.), 2450 m. May 
22-24, 1963 ( Sedlacek ) . 

Additional material. See Notes, below. 
Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Chimbu Vy. 

Notes. T. altus and its allies {dux, above, 
and medius, below) are the common moun- 
tain-living Tricliotichnus of New Guinea. 
These 3 species seem clearU distinct and 
have differcMit, but in part o\(>rlapping, 
ranges: dux, on the mountains of the 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 55 



Morobe area; typical alius, on the Bismarck traps, and such material usually includes 

Range; and typical medius, on the Torri- only fully winged individuals and is not 

celli Mts. However, I have seen many satisfactory for study of wing dimorphism, 

additional specimens of alius or closely This is another reason for not attempting 

related forms from other localities, as fol- a more detailed study of alius and related 

lows. Papua: 9, Mt. Giluwe, 2500 m. May species with the material available now. 
1 and 27, June 6, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, 

Dimifa, SE. of Mt. Giluwe, 2200 m, Oct. Trichotichnus medius n. sp. 
11, 1958 (Gressitt); 1, Owen Stanley Rge., 

Goilala, Bome, 1950 m. Mar. 8-15, 1958 Description. With characters of genus; 

(W. \y. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Mafulu, form average; black, appendages brownish 

4000 ft. (1220 m), Jan. 1934 (Cheesman). testaceous, abdomen with or without poorly 

N-E. N. G.: 270 specimens (in addition to defined pale lateral areas (variable), hind 

the type series) from localities including femora not sirikino^ly paler than abdomen, 

Morobe Dist.; Kratke Mts.; W. Highlands; tibiae paler than femora; shining, elytra 

and (S. of the Markham-Ramu Vy.) Sala- not visibly microreticulate at 50x. Head 

waket Rge; Mongi Watershed; and Huon 0.78 and 0.79 width prothorax; eyes sepa- 

Pen. West N. G.: 35 specimens, from rated from mouth below by % or Vs diam- 

localities including the Star Rge.; Wissel eter of an eye. Pwihorax subcordate; width/ 

Lakes; and Snow Mts. (Top Camp; lebele length 1.49 and 1.52; base/apex 1.18 and 

Camp; Mist Camp; Baliem Camp). Most 1.14; sides converging and straight or 

specimens are from altitudes of 1200 to slightly sinuate before well defined but 

2700 m, but a few, from within 200 m of obtuse basal angles; fine basal marginal 

sea level. Individuals have been taken in line usually complete; disc moderately de- 

every month. Most specimens are in the pressed at sides basally, extensively punc- 

British Mus., Bishop Mus., A.M.N.H., tate across base, punctation much finer 

Leiden Mus., C.S.I.R.O. Coll., and M.C.Z. and somewhat sparser across middle and 

I have restricted the type series of alius anteriorly. Elyira: width elytra prothorax 
and its close relatives to specimens from 1,31 and 1.26; margins without 10th inter- 
single localities or restricted areas because vals; outer intervals not distinctly punc- 
the species of this group obviously vary tulate. Inner icings full. Lower sutiace: 
geographically as well as individually. In flnfen'or part of prosternum with pubescence 
general, specimens from north of the Mark- usually sparse (but variable). Secondary 
ham-Ramu Valley average larger, those sexual characters normal. Measurements: 
from south of the valley smaller, except length c. 7.5-8.5; width 3.1-3.3 mm. 
that some specimens from Wau are as small Types. Holotype S ( Bishop Mus. ) and 
as some of the types of medius. Two dis- 22 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
tinct forms, a very large one (dux) and a 31,371) from Mokai Village, Torricelli Mts., 
smaller one (tentatively referred to alius), N-E. N. G., 750 m, various dates in Dec. 
occur at Edie Creek, showing that the 1958 and Jan. 1959 (holotype, Jan. 1-23, 
species of this group are not entirely al- 1959) (^^^ W. Brandt); and additional 
lopatric. The characters, variation, and dis- paratypes, all from Torricelli Mts., as fol- 
tribution of these species need more study lows: 19, Mobitei, 750 m, dates in Feb., 
than I can give them now. Mar., Apr. 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 

T. alius is known to have dimorphic wings Mus. ) ; 3, Wantipi, Nov. 30-Dec. 8, 1958 

(see Description) only on the Bismarck (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 

Range. The specimens in question were Additional material. Some specimens 

not collected at light. Much of the other among those summarized under Trichoti- 

material listed above was taken in light chnus alius may prove referable to medius, 



56 



Bulletin Museum of Coiupuratwe Zoologij, Vol. 137, No. 1 



especially the smaller ones from south of 
the Markham-Ramii Valley and from Wau. 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Mokai. 

Notes. This species is difficult to define 
exactly. It is larger than niii,ric(U]s, with 
basal marginal line of pronotum usually 
entire (usually interrupted in ni'^ricans). 
It is smaller than modus and (dtus, with 
eyes intermediate in size. The sparseness 
of pubescence on the anterior part of the 
prosternum is an aid in identification, but 
it is not infallible. This species is more 
shining than most Trichofichnus, and ap- 
proaches Lijter (p. 63) in appearance, but 
the clothing of the male front and middle 
tarsi of mcdius consists of 2 rows of broad 
scales as usual in Trichotichnus. Neverthe- 
less, a Tricliolicluius like the present one 
may have been ancestral to Lytcr. 

Trichotichnus brandti n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form average; black or piceous, not marked 
above except lateral margins of elytra and 
sometimes of prothorax narrowly incon- 
spicuously rufesccnt or translucent; reddish 
piceous below with epipleurae and narrow 
maigin of abdomen paler, the pale marks 
usually widest and most conspicuous at 
sides of subapical ventral segment; ap- 
pendages brownish testaceous, femora con- 
spicuously paler than abdomen; shining, 
elytra without distinct reticukite micro- 
sculpture. Head 0.75 and 0.76 width pro- 
thorax; eyes separated from mouth below 
by about 'c diameter of an vyv. Prothorax 
transverse-subcordate; width/length 1 .43 
and 1.45; base/apex 1.20 and 1.21; sides 
converging and straight or slightly sinuate 
before obtuse but well formed ( sometimes 
slightly bhuited) basal angles; disc de- 
pressed at sides near base, extensively punc- 
tate, least so near middle; basal marginal 
line faint or interrupted at middle. Klijlrtr. 
width elytra prothorax 1.36 and 1.38; Stli 
and 9th int(>rvals usually with a little sparse, 
fine punctulation. Secotidanj sexual char- 



acters normal. Measurements: length 8.3- 
9.3; width 3.4-3.8 mm. 

Ti/pcs. Ilolotvpe S (Bishop Mus.) and 
3 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,372) 
from Feramin, N-E. N. G., 1200-1500 m. 
May 11-22 (holotype), 23-31, 1959 (W. 
W. Brandt); and additional paratypes as 
follows, all from N-E. N. G.: 3, Torricelli 
Mts., Mobitei, 750 m. Mar. 16-31. Apr. 1- 
15, 16-22, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus. ); 2, Eliptamin Vy., 1665-2530 m, June 
23-30, and 2, same localitx, 1200-1350 m, 
Aug. 16-30 and Sept. 1-15, 1959 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 15, Wau, Morobe 
Dist, 1100, 1200 (most), 1300, and 1700- 
1800 m. Mar., Apr., and all months from 
June to Dec., 1961-1963 (Sedlacek). 

Additional material. The following addi- 
tional specimens are tentatixely assigned 
to this species. Papua: 1, Dogon, Amazon 
Bay Dist., 2400 ft. (c. 730 m), Sept. 1962 
(W. W. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.); 1, Kokoda, 
1200 ft. (366 m), July 1933 (Cheesman), 
at light. N-E. N. G.: 1, Tuwep. Salawaket 
Rge.\ 1350 m, Sept. 9, 1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr.. 
Bishop Mus.), in light trap. West N. G.: 
1, Cyclops Mts., Sabron Camp 2. 2000 ft.. 
June 1936 (Cheesman); 1, "Neth. New 
CTuinea' without further locality, Oct. 20. 
1944 (T. Aarons, California Acad.). 

Measured s})ecimens. The ^ holotype and 
1 9 paratN'pe from Feramin. 

Notes. See under lollowing species 
(obscurus). 

Trichotichnus obscurus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
ionn broad-average; brownish piceous, lat- 
eral margins of prothorax and cKtra \aguel\- 
paler or translueeut; abdomen broadK' mar- 
gin(>d with yellow, the \eIlow margins 
widest anteriorh'; appendages testaceous, 
hind leinora strikingK jiale; inodeiateK' 
shining, elytia witli transNcrse reticulate 
microsculpture \isible in both sexes (at 
50 ■ ). Head 0.77 and 0.76 width prothorax; 
eyes separated lioin mouth below by Vi 
or less width o( an e\e. Prothorax trans- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 57 



verse-subcordate; width length 1.40 and 
1.44; base/apex 1.21 and 1.20; sides con- 
verging, slightly, broadly sinuate before dis- 
tinct but obtuse posterior angles; disc mod- 
erately depressed at sides basally, extensively 
but rather finely punctate except almost 
impunctate at middle. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.34 and 1.27; 8th and 9th 
intervals usually not distinctly punctulate. 
Secondary sexual characters normal. Mea- 
siiremeuts: length 8.5-9.4; width 3.3-3.7 
mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
2 paratypes (1 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,373) 
from Saidor, Matoko, Finisterre Rge., N-E. 
N. G., Aug. 29-Sept. 5 and Sept. 6-24, 
1958 (W. W. Brandt); and additional 
paratypes as follows: Papua: 1, S. High- 
lands^ Dimifa, SE. of Mt. Giluwe, 2200 m, 
Oct. 11, 1958 (Gressitt). N-E. N. G.: 2, 
Wau, Morobe Dist., 1200 m, Nov. 1-20 and 
Dec. 1961 (Sedlacek); 7, Edie Creek, 14 
km SW. of Wau, 2000 m, Feb. 13, 1962 
(Sedlacek); 1, Eliptamin Vv., 1200-1350 
m, Aug. 1-15, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.). 

Measured speciynens. The <^ holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Saidor. 

Notes. Although this species is superfi- 
cially similar to the preceding one {hrandti), 
I think it is distinct, differing most obvi- 
ously by presence of elytral microsculpture. 
The 8th and 9th elytral intervals are usually 
less punctulate in ohscurus than in hrandti. 

Jrichotichnus gutfula n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form average; brownish black above, sides 
of elytra ( and to some extent of prothorax ) 
testaceous, elytra with a conspicuous com- 
mon testaceous subapical sutural spot 
(reaching 3rd intervals), abdomen either 
with irregular broad testaceous margins or 
wholly rufescent, appendages brownish 
testaceous; moderately shining, elytra usu- 
ally with distinct transverse microreticula- 
tion. Head 0.78 and 0.79 width prothorax; 
eyes large, separated from mouth below 
by c. Vs width of an eye. Prothorax sub- 



transverse; width/length 1.48 and 1.43; 
base/apex 1.19 and 1.21; sides rounded 
anteriorly, converging and nearly straight 
or slightly sinuate before obtuse but well 
defined basal angles; disc depressed at 
sides basally; basal marginal line usually 
indistinct at middle; surface of disc exten- 
sively punctate, the punctation finer and 
less dense at middle. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.32 and 1.33; 8th and 9th inter- 
vals not or not much punctulate. Secondary 
sexual characters normal. Measurements: 
length 7.6-8.7; width 3.1-3.6 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (Bishop Mus.) and 
31 paratvpes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,374) 'from Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G., 1200 m, Feb., Mar., June, Aug., 
Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec. 1961-1963 (Sedla- 
ceks); 1 paratype, same locality, 1700- 
1800 m, Nov. 17, 1961 (Sedlacek). 

Additional material. Twenty-four speci- 
mens from 13 widely scattered localities 
including Dobodura, in all 3 political divi- 
sions of New Guinea; altitudes, near sea 
level to c. 2000 m. Specimens taken in 
every month except May and June. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Wau. 

Notes. This species is characterized by 
its size plus presence of a conspicuous pale 
subapical sutural spot. It is apparently 
widely distributed especially in the foot- 
hills and lower mountains of New Guinea. 
Specimens of this or a closely related 
species have been seen also from New 
Britain and New Ireland (Bishop Mus.). 

Trichotichnus mongi n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 22, differing from other 
Trichotichnus by subquadrate prothorax, 
strongly narrowed anteriorly; piceous, lat- 
eral margins of prothorax and elytra nar- 
rowly translucent or pale, sutural intervals 
reddish toward apex; shining, elytra sub- 
iridescent, without distinct reticulate micro- 
sculpture. Head 0.72 width prothorax; 
eyes rather small, separated from mouth 
below by more than V^ width of an eye. 



58 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



Prothorox subquadrate except strongly nar- 
rowed at extreme front; width length 1.40; 
base/apex 1.35; sides rounded anteriorly, 
broadly sinuate before c. right ( slightly 
obtuse) basal angles; basal marginal line 
fine but entire; disc scarcely depressed at 
sides, extensively punctate, the punctures 
finer and less dense across middle. Elytra 
convex ( more so than usual ) ; width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.46; outer intervals with a little 
sparse punctulation. Secondary .sexual char- 
acters of 9 normal; i unknown. Measure- 
ments: length c. 7.5; width 3.3 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,375) from Tumnang, Mongi Watershed, 
Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., 1400-1600 m, Apr. 
14-15, 1955 (E. O. ^^^ilson); the type is 
unique. 

Notes. The unique form of this species 
makes it worth describing, even though 
I have only one specimen of it and do not 
know the male. 

Trichotichnus semirugosus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. average, small; brownish piceous, 
margins of prothorax and elytra narrowly 
testaceous, elytra with common subapical 
sutural pale spot usually reaching 3rd in- 
tervals; lower surface in part dark but with 
extensive, irregular testaceous areas; anten- 
nae brownish, legs brownish testaceous; 
rather shining, elytra usually with faint 
tran.sverse microreticulation. Head O.H\ and 
0.84 width prothorax; eyes rather large, 
separated from mouth below by <". 's width 
of an eye. Prothorax subcordate; width 
length 1.51 and 1.4(S; base apex 1.12 and 
1.16; sides broadly round(>d anteriorly, con- 
verging and straight or nearly so posteriorly; 
posterior anglers distinct but obtuse, some- 
times minutely denticulate; base more 
oblique at sides than usual, not or indis- 
tinctly margined; disc weakly depressed at 
sides, extensively punctate, the punctation 
finer and less dense across middle. Elytra: 
width elytra /prothorax 1.39 and 1.44; 8tli 
and 9th intervals rugosely punctate, punc- 
tation present but less dense at bases of 6th 



and 7th intervals. Secondary sexual char- 
acters normal. Measurements: length 5.3- 
6.8; width 2.3-2.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,376) and 2 (99) paratypes from 
Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Dar- 
lington); and additional paratvpes as fol- 
lows: N-E. N. G.: 1, Wau, 1200 m, No\'. 
21, 1961 (Sedlaceks); 7, Finschhafen, Huon 
Pen., 10 m, Apr. 9-16, 1963 (Sedlacek), in 
mercurv vapor light trap; 3. Torricelli Mts., 
Mobitei, 750 m, Feb. 28-Mar. 4, Mar. 16- 
31, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 
West N. G.: 1, Cyclops Mts. (no further 
details) (Cheesman); 2, Hollandia area. 
W. Sentani, Cyclops Mts., 50-100 m, June 
22-24, 1959 (Gressitt), in light trap; 2, 
Ifar, Cvclops Mts., 450-500 m, Sept. 7 and 
9, 1962 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. One i paratype 
from Mobitei and the 9 holotype, in this 
order. 

Notes. The coloration and the dense 
punctation of the ehtral margins would 
place this species in Lampetes, if Lampetes 
were distinguished from Trichotichnus. The 
new species is in fact close to Lampetes 
isahellinus Louwerens of Amboina (Tijd- 
schrift voor Ent. 105, 1962, p. 140). Ho\\'- 
ever, comparison with paratopes of isa- 
hellinus shows that scmiruii.osus has the 
outer elytral intervals more completeK' and 
more densely rugose, although the differ- 
ence is not great. 

Trichotichnus mixtus n. sp. 

Descriplion. With characters of genus; 
lorm average, rather small; brownish i^ice- 
ous, lateral margins ol prothorax and elytia 
transluc(Mit or pale, and sutural and some- 
times 2nd interxals ol clxtia paler befori' 
apex (variable), abdomen broadK" but ir- 
regularly pale-margined, legs and antennae 
irregularly brownish ti'staceous; shining, 
elytra with or without light transverse 
mieroretieulation. llccul 0.79 and 0.79 width 
piothorax; eyes rather large, separated Irom 
mouth below by c. 'is diameter ol an eye. Pro- 
ihonix transNcrse-subeordate; width length 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 59 



1.54 and 1.54; base apex 1.15 and 1.13; 
sides broadly rounded anteriorly, nearly 
straight and converging posteriorly to ob- 
tuse, sometimes slightly blunted posterior 
angles; basal marginal line usually inter- 
rupted at middle; disc depressed at sides 
basally, extensively punctate, the puncta- 
tion finer and sparser across middle. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.36 and 1.36; 7th 
and 8th intervals variabK' punctate (8th 
varying from almost impunctate to almost 
rugose); other intervals sparsely or not 
punctulate. Secondary sexual characters 
normal. Measurements: length 5.8-7.5; 
width 2.8-3.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mns.) and 
4 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,377) 
from Torricelli Mts., Mobitei, N-E. N. G., 
750 m. Mar. 5-15, Apr. 16-22 (holotype 
with latter date), 1959 (W. W. Brandt). 

Additional material. Twenty-one speci- 
mens from 11 localities (including Wau) 
in all 3 political divisions of New Guinea 
are assigned to mixtus but not as types. 
They vary considerably in several char- 
acters. 

Measured specimens. The c5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. Because of the variation of this 
species ( if it is all one species ) I have con- 
fined the type series to specimens from one 
locality. In general, the species should be 
recognizable by size; sutural intervals pale 
before apex; prothorax usually relatively 
wide (wider and a little more depressed 
at sides toward base than in scmirug,o.sus); 
and outer elytral intervals usually punc- 
tulate but not rugose, although this last 
character is surprisingly variable even in 
the type series. 

Trichotichnus delicafus n .sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 23 ) slender-average, very small; 
brownish piceous, prothorax with margins 
narrowly pale or translucent, elytra with 
margins and common subapical sutural spot 
(including small parts of 2nd intervals) 



testaceous or rufescent; abdomen with or 
without well defined pale margins; af)pend- 
ages testaceous; shining, elytra without 
reticulate microsculpture. Head 0.74 and 
0.77 width prothorax; eyes moderate, sepa- 
rated from mouth below by c. '^i\ or Vs width 
of an eye. Prothorax subcordate; width/ 
length 1.50 and 1.44; base/apex 1.11 and 
1.21; sides broadly slightly sinuate before 
obtuse, usually slightly blunted posterior 
angles; basal marginal line vague or incom- 
plete at middle; disc scarcely depressed at 
sides even basally, less densely punctate 
than usual, with middle of disc least punc- 
tate. Elytra: width elytra/ prothorax 1.30 
and 1.31; outer intervals without or with 
only sparse punctulation. Secondary sexual 
characters normal. Measurements: length 
5.3-5.8; width 2.2-2.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (Hungarian Nat. 
Mus.) and 1 9 paratype (M.C.Z., Type 
No. 31,378) from I. Deslacs (Garove Is.), 
N-E. N. G., 1901 (Biro); and additional 
paratypes as follows: Papua: 1, Woodlark 
Is. (Murua), Kulumadau Hill, Mar. 9-12, 
1957 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). West 
N. G.: 1, Hollandia, Dec. 1944 (W. T. 
Nailon, Fenton Coll.); 1, Res. Hollandia, 
Dojo, 2nd Strip, July 12, 1957 ( R. T. Simon 
Thomas, Louwerens Coll.). 

Measured specimens. A i paratype from 
Woodlark Is. (the only 6 of the species 
seen) and the 9 holotype, in this order. 

Notes. T. delicatus is characterized b\' 
small size, markings, and scarcely depressed 
sides of pronotum. 

Genus HARPALOXENUS Schauberger 

Schauberger 1933, Ent. Anzeiger 13, p. 154. 

Diagnosis. Characters as for Trichotichnus 
(preceding genus) except anterior tibiae 
wider; form characteristic (Fig. 24); upper 
surface without distinct reticulate micro- 
sculpture, but 8th and 9th elytral intervals 
closely punctulate (except in fortis), other 
intervals sparselv or not punctulate; wings 
full. 

Description. None required here. 



60 



Bulletin Museum of Cotnporaiive Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Type species. 11. javanus Schauberger, of 
Java. 

Generic (listriJ)iifion. Java and Ando- 
nare Is., Celel>es, Philippines, Moluccas 

(Halmahera), New Guinea, and (unpub- 
lished) Solomon Islands and New 
Hebrides. 

Notes. The species assigned to this genus 
seem to form a natural group. However, 
the group is apparently closely allied to 
TricJioticlinus and further study may show 
that it is not worth generic separation. 

Key to Species of Harpaloxenus of 
New Guinea 

1. Anterior tibiae with apex c. Mi wide as 
til)ial leii.irtli: head relatively wider (more 
than 0.80 width prothorax) - ^ - 2 

- Anterior tibiae with apex c. M wide as tibial 
len.qth; head relatively smaller (usually less 
than 0.80 width prothorax) -- 3 

2. Male with front but not middle tarsi 
squamulose (p. 60) fortis 

- Male with front and middle tarsi squamulose 
(p. 61) ma.s 

3. Larj^er (length c. 11 mm) (p. 62) wan 

- Smaller (length c. 10 mm or less) - 4 

4. Frouotum with sides usually slightly de- 
pressed toward 1)ase, base usually more 
eoarsely and extensiveh' punetate, posterior 
angles usually better defined, and median- 
lateral setae usually c. Vi of prothoracic 
length before apex (p. 61) celehen.sis 

- Pronotum with sides not depressed, base 
usualK' more finely punetate especially at 
middle of base, posterior angles usually more 
obtuse, and median-lateral setae usually c. 
'':! of prothoracic length before apex (p. 
62 ) sedlaccki 

Harpaloxenus fortis n. sp. 

Dcscri])lio)i. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 24, heavily built; ])rownish 
piceous, lateral margins ol pronotum and 
elytra including 9th intervals ±: yellowish, 
lower surhice with extensive yellowish areas 
especially laterally, appendages brownisli 
testaceous. Head wide, ().<S(S and ().(S5 w idth 
prothorax; antennae stout, middle segments 
scarcely longer than wide. Proihorax 
broadly cordate; width/length 1.57 and 
1.58; base/apex 0.93 and 0.99; sides con- 
verging and usually l)roadl\' but not strongly 
sinuate before obtuse but distincl basal 



angles; disc slightly depressed at sides pos- 
teriorly, basal impressions weak and ir- 
regular, base punctate chiefly toward sides. 
Elytra elongate-quadrate; width elytra pro- 
thorax 1.14 and 1.14; outer intervals (8. 
9) less punctulate than usual in genus; 3rd 
intervals either with or (usually) without 
minute puncture on inner edge behind 
middle. Le^.s: front tibiae very wide in 
both sexes, apex c. Va wide as tibial length, 
and apex usually sinuate-emarginate with 
outer angle slightly produced; middle tibiae 
slightly wider and more arcuate than in 
most other species of genus. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 front tarsi slightly di- 
lated, with segments 1 (apex only) to 4 2- 
seriately squamulose below; middle tarsi 
not perceptibly dilated and not squamulose. 
Measurements: length 8.5-10.3; width 3.1- 
3.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,379 ) and 17 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes from Papua as fol- 
lows: 8, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m). May. 
July, Aug. 1933 (Cheesman); 1, same lo- 
cality. Mar. 20, 1956 (Gressitt), in light 
trap; 2, Saputa, near Buna, 1943-44 ( R. B. 
Speiry, Chicago Mus.); 1, Deria, Amazon 
Bay Dist., Dec. 1962 (W. W. Brandt. 
C.S.I.R.O.); 1, Mt. Lamington, 1300-1500 
ft. (c. 400-450 m) (C. T. McNamara, S. 
Australian Mus.). 

Additional material. West N. G.: 2. 
(99), Ilollandia, Apr. 1945 (B. Malkin. 
U.S.N.M.); 3 (99), Hollandia area, W. 
Sentani, Cyclops Mts., 50-100, 150-250 m, 
June 17, 22-24, 1959 (Gressitt and T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.), 2 of thes(> specimens 
teneral and taken in light trap; 1 s" , Kota 
Nika, Res. Ilollandia, Jan. 25, 1956 ( R. T. 
Simon Thomas, Louwerens (^oU.); 1 9, 
Wasian, Vogelkop, Sept. 1939 (Wind. 
M.C'.Z. ). Thes(> specimens unfortunat<:4\ 
are all 9 9 . The\' arc referred to the 
present spc>cies rather than the following 
one (mas) because the 8th and 9th ehtral 
inter\als are almost impunctate. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 61 



Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. The present species differs from 
all others known in the genus by absence 
of squamules on the male middle tarsi. 
However, I do not think that this justifies 
making a separate genus or subgenus. This 
species seems otherwise to be a well char- 
acterized Harpaloxenus, and it apparently 
is closely related to the following (mas), 
which has the male middle tarsi normally 
squamulose. 

Harpaloxenus mas n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in preceding species (foiiis) 
but slightly less heavily built; characters as 
in preceding species except as follows. 
Head relatively slightly smaller, 0.81 and 
0.S2 width prothorax. Prothorax with sides 
converging but not or scarcely sinuate pos- 
teriorly, and with posterior angles slightly 
more obtuse; width/length 1.52 and 1.45; 
base/apex 1.00 and 0.9cS. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.24 and 1.29; outer inter- 
vals (8, 9) closely punctulate at least an- 
teriorly, sometimes in part rugose. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters: i front and middle 
tarsi slightly dilated, 2-seriately squamu- 
lose. Measurements: length c. 9.5-10.5; 
width 3.5-3.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) and 
3 ( (5 9 9 ) paratypes (pair in M.C.Z., Type 
No. 31,380) from Finschhafen, Huon Pen., 
N-E. N. C, 10 m, Apr. 9-16, 1963 ( Sedla- 
cek), in mercury vapor light trap; 1 i 
paratype, Wau, 1050 m, Nov. 4, 1961 
(Sedlacek); 1 i paratype. Hoi Maffin, near 
Sarmi, West N. G., July 18, 1959 (T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Finschhafen. 

Notes. This species resembles the pre- 
ceding one in width of front tibiae but 
differs in details of form (slightly nar- 
rower head, slightly differently .shaped pro- 
thorax) and in extensive punctulation of 
outer elytral intervals. The paratype from 
Hoi Maffin has these intervals less punc- 



tulate than in the Finschhafen specimens 
but still more punctulate than in any fortis 
that I have seen. 

Harpaloxenus celebensis Schauberger 

Schauberger 1933, Ent. Anzeiger 13, pp. 155, 157. 
Louwerens 1953, Verhandlungen Naturforschenden 

Gesellschaft Basel 64, p. 306. 
1956, Treubia 23, p. 222. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
average, rather variable; prothorax and 
elytra usually narrowly yellow-margined. 
Head 0.75 and 0.81 width prothorax. Pro- 
thorax trans verse-subcordate; width length 
1.50 and 1.52; base/apex 1.20 and 1.06 (ex- 
ceptionally variable); sides rather weakly 
converging, not or only slightly sinuate be- 
fore distinct but slightly obtuse or blunted 
posterior angles, with anterior-lateral setae 
usually c. V4 of prothoracic length from 
apex. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.24 
and 1.21; dorsal punctures usually present, 
on inner edge 3rd intervals against 2nd 
striae (sometimes absent on one or both 
elytra). Legs: front tibiae with apex c. % 
wide as tibial length. Secondary sexual 
characters: S front and middle tarsi squamu- 
lose. Measurements: length 8.5-10; width 
3.2-3.8 mm. 

Type. From South Celebes; probably 
in Schauberger Coll. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 7, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
2, Dogon, Amazon Bay Dist., 2400 ft. (c. 
740 m), Oct.-Nov. 1962 (W. W. Brandt, 
C.S.I.R.O.) N-E. N. G.: 3, Wau, Morobe 
Dist, 1200 m, Dec. 18, 1961 (Sedlacek); 
1, Finschhafen, 10 m, Apr. 9-16, 1963 
(Sedlacek), in hght trap; 2, Torricelli Mts., 
Mobitei, 750 m. Mar. 5-15, 16-31, 1959 
{\y. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). West N. G.: 
6, Hollandia and vicinity including Cyclops 
Mts. (various dates and collectors); and 5, 
doubtfully identified, from localities farther 
west in West N. C, including Biak Is. 

Measured specimens. A pair ( <^ 9 ) from 
Dobodura. 

Notes. Louwerens records celebensis 
from Java, Sumba, and Halmahera, as 



62 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



well as Celebes, and the present records 
extend its range to New Guinea. However, 
variation is considerable and I am not sure 
of my identifications in some cases. Small 
specimens of this species can be confused 
with certain Trichotichnus, especially with 
discolored individuals of ii.uttula, but the 
particular Trichotichnus in question do not 
have the Sth and 9th elvtral intervals closelv 
punctulate and have, of course, slightly 
narrower front tibiae. See under the follow- 
ing species (sedlaceki) for further com- 
parisons. 

Harpaloxenus sedlaceki n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form average; black or piceous, sides of pro- 
notum not or vaguely pale, elytra narrowly 
pale-margined, abdomen pale-spotted at 
sides, appendages brownish testaceous. 
Head 0.75 and 0.75 width prothorax. 
Prothorax transverse-subquadrate; width 
length 1.50 and 1.49; base apex 1.19 and 
1.21; sides moderately converging and nearly 
straight posteriorly but usually not sinuate, 
with median-lateral setae usually c. M', of pro- 
thoracic length before apex; posterior angles 
obtuse, ± blunted; disc rather strongly almost 
evenly convex, not depressed at sides pos- 
teriorly, baso-lateral impressions slight and 
poorly defined; base (rather finely) punctate 
especially at sides. Elytra: width elytra, pro- 
thorax 1.22 and 1.20; outer intervals (8, 9) 
extensively closely punctulate; dorsal punc- 
tures of 3rd intervals usually c. midway be- 
tween 2nd and .3rd striae (see Notes, be- 
low). Le^s: front tibiae with apex c. Vl 
wide as tibial length. Secondary sexual 
characters: 6 front and middle tarsi sliglith 
dilated, 2-seriately scpiamulose. Mea.surc- 
menls: l(>ngth 8.0-9.0; width 3.1-3.5 mm. 

'Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) ami 
20 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,381) from Wau, Morobe Dist., 'l20() m, 
N-E. N. G., dates in Apr., Aug., Oct., Nov., 
Dec. 1961-1963 (Sedlacek). 

Additional material. Twenty-two speci- 
mens from numerous localities, from Mo- 
dewa and Dobodura in Papua to Hollandia 



in West N. G. Some of these specimens 
are identified only doubtfully. 

Measured s))ecimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. This species is similar to celehensis 
(above) but differs in having the pronotum 
slightly more convex with sides usually not 
at all depressed toward base, and in other 
ways indicated in the preceding Key to 
Species of Harpaloxenus of Neic Guinea. 

In the types of sedlaceki the dorsal punc- 
ture of the 3rd interval is usually midway 
between the 2nd and 3rd striae, not close 
to the 2nd stria. Of the 21 specimens from 
Wau, only 1 has the puncture close to the 
2nd stria (on the inner edge of the 3rd 
interval) on both elytra. Two have the 
puncture close to the 2nd stria on one 
elytron but near the middle of the 3rd 
interval on the other. One has the puncture 
close to the 3rd stria on one elytron. And 
17 have the puncture near the middle of the 
3rd interval (but somewhat variable in 
position ) on both elytra. However, this un- 
usual position of dorsal punctures may be 
characteristic of the local population at 
Wau rather than of the species as a \\'hole. 

Harpaloxenus wau n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form nearly as in celehensis and sedlaceki, 
but larger; pronotum and ehtra not or nar- 
rowly and faintly pale-margined, abdomen 
with irregular testaceous marks at sides, 
appendages brownish testaceous. Head 0.73 
and 0.75 width prothorax. Prothorax trans- 
verse-subquadrate; width length 1.48 and 
1.51; base apex 1.17 and 1.24; sides slightly 
converging posteriori), nearly straight but 
not sinuate before slightK obtuse-blunted 
posterior angl{\s; disc usualK' slightly de- 
pressed at sides posteriorh', baso-lateral im- 
pressions \agu(\ base finch punctate espe- 
cialh- toward sides. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.30 and 1.28; outer intervals (8, 
9) extensively punctulat(\ 3rd intervals with 
dorsal punctur(> usualK' by 2nd stria behind 
middle. Leii,s: Iront tibiae with ajiex c. 'i 
wide as tibial length. Secondary sexual 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



63 



characters: S front and middle tarsi slightly 
dilated, 2-seriately squamulose. Measure- 
ments: length c. 11; width c. 4.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
29 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,382) from Wau and vicinity, Morobe 
Dist., N-E. N. G., 1100, 1200 (most), 1700- 
1800 m, dates in every month, 1961-1964 
( Sedlacek ) . 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. The large size distinguishes this 
species from other similar ones. As com- 
pared with sedlaceki, with which it occurs, 
wau is not only larger but has the sides of 
the pronotum usually slightly depressed 
toward base and the dorsal puncture of 
the 3rd intervals usually adjacent to the 2nd 
stria. Of the 8 types, only 1 has this punc- 
ture distant from the 2nd stria on both 
elytra. Two have the puncture against the 
2nd stria on one elytron but distant from it 
on the other elytron. And 5 have the punc- 
ture against or very near the 2nd stria on 
both elytra. 

LYTER n. gen. 

Diapiosis. Form and characters of me- 
dium-sized Trichofichnus, but c$ front and 
middle tarsi below with more than 2 rows 
of long, slender scales forming a loose 
vestiture (not a dense sole); prosternum 
glabrous anteriorly; 3rd elytral intervals 
without or with only faint traces of dorsal 
punctures. 

Description. Head: eyes separated from 
mouth below by c. Vs diameter of an eye; 
antennae rather short, middle segments c. 
IVaX long as wide; front smoothly convex 
except frontal suture shaiply impressed, 
with impressed lines extending diagonally 
back to above eyes; mentum with triangular 
tooth; labial palpi with penultimate seg- 
ments plurisetose; ligula long, emarginate, 
2-setose outside middle of length; para- 
glossae shorter than ligula. Frothorax with 
1 lateral seta each side about Vi prothoracic 
length from apex. Elytra: margins entire 
at base, obtusely subangulate at humeri, 



sinuate before apex; marginal channels nar- 
row, without partial 10th intei-vals; striae 
entire; scutellar striae long, at base 2nd 
intervals; 3rd intervals impunctate or with 
vestige of puncture by 2nd striae behind 
middle (position as in Trichotichnus) . 
Lower surface: prosternum glabrous an- 
teriorly but with several setae at apex pro- 
sternal process. Inner wings full. Legs: 
front tibiae irregularly truncate, apex c. V:, 
wide as tibial length, with principal (inner 
apical) spur not much expanded; hind tarsi 
with 1st segment 2x or more as long as wide 
at apex, 5th segment with 2 accessory setae 
each side. Secondary sexual characters: S 
front tarsi slightly dilated, 4 segments 
loosely clothed below with slender long 
scales; middle tarsi scarcely dilated, with 
some (fewer) similar scales; 2 setae each 
side last ventral segment in both sexes; 
S copulatory organs as in Figure 174, with 
apex of middle lobe not produced beyond 
orifice. 

Type species. Lyter glaher n. sp. (below). 

Generic distribution. The single species 
is confined to New Guinea, so far as 
known. 

Notes. The relationships of this new 
genus are doubtful. It may be derived 
from an ancestor like Trichotichnus medius 
(p. 55), from which it differs most obvi- 
ously in the clothing of the 6 tarsi (2- 
seriately squamulose in Trichotichnus). The 
new genus is notable also for its relatively 
long ligula, for absence of pubescence on 
anterior part of prosternum, and for virtual 
suppression of dorsal elytral punctures. 

The name Lyter, from the Greek, signifies 
one who loosens ( the squamae of the S front 
tarsi ) . 

Lyter glaber n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 25; reddish piceous, ap- 
pendages redder; shining, reticulate micro- 
sculpture absent on front of head and disc 
of pronotum, faint and somewhat transverse 
on elytral intervals. Head 0.75 and 0.77 
width prothorax. Prothorax: width length 



64 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoolofiy. Vol. 137, No. 1 



1.45 and 1.49; base/apex 1.12 and 1.16; 
sides rounded anteriorly, c. straight and 
converging in posterior half, narrowly mar- 
gined; posterior angles slightly obtuse, 
blunted; base and apex with or without 
faint marginal lines; disc slightly depressed 
at sides basally, the depressed areas finely 
but not closely punctate. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 1.21 and 1.22. Measure- 
ments: length 7.3-8.3; width 2.9-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (California Acad.) 
and 32 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type 
No. 31,383) from Finschhafen, N-E. N. G., 
various dates in April and May (holotype. 
May 1) (E. S. Ross); and additional para- 
types as follows. Papua: 21, Kokoda, 
1200 ft. (366 m), Apr., Aug., Sept. 1933 
(Cheesman); 1, Owen Stanley Rge., Goilala, 
Tapini, 975 m, Nov. 16-25, 1957 (W. \V. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Dogon, Amazon 
Bay Dist., 2400 ft. (730 m), Oct.-Nov. 
1962 (W. \V. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.); 1, Mt. 
Lamington, 1300-1500 ft. {c. 400-450 m) 
(C. T. McNamara, S. Australian Mus.). 
N-E. N. G.: 5, "No. 14," Umi R., Markham 
Vy., 480 m, dates in Nov. 1959 (Sixth 
Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.); 1, Lae, July 
1924 (F. E. Skinner, Bishop Mus.); 3, 
Bulolo, 730, 1170 m, Aug. 15, 19, 21, 1956 
(E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.); 58, Wau, 
Morobe Dist., 1200 m, dates in every 
month except June, 1961-1963 (Sedlacek); 

2, same locality, 1700-1800 m, Nov. 17, 
1961 (Sedlacek); 4, Sum-Sum, 64 km N. of 
Wau, 580 m, Feb. 15, 1963 ( Sedlacek ) ; 1, 
Karimui, S. of Ooroka, 1000 m, June 3, 
1961 (Cre.ssitt), in light trap. West N. <;.: 

3, Ilollandia area, \V. Sentani, Cvclops 
Mts., 50-100, 150-250 m, June 17, 22-24, 
1959 (Gressitt); 1, Kota Nika, Res. Ilol- 
landia, Feb. 14, 1956 (R. T. Simon Thomas, 
Louwerens Coll.), in light trap. 

Measured speeimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype Irom I'^inschhalen. 

Notes. Although this carabid is appar- 
ently common in some places, I hiiled to 
find it and do not know its habitat. The 
k)calities suggest that it lives in rain forest. 
Specimens Irom Bulolo and Ilollandia were 



taken in light traps, which implies that the 
insect flies. 

Genus COLEOUSSUS Bates 

Bates 1892, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 32, p. 338. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caral)idae, Harpalinae 6, 

p. 1217 (as suligenus of TriclioticJiniis) . 
Andrewes 1939, Ann. Maj?. Nat. Hist. (11) 3, p. 

132. 

Diaiinosis. See Key to Genera of Har))alini 
of New Guinea. 

Deseription ( for recognition only ) . Form 
of broad medium-sized Harpalini; upper 
surface ( in New Guinean species ) \'er)- 
shining, without reticulate microsculpture. 
Head: eyes relatively large (compared 
with most Triehotichnus), almost contigu- 
ous with sides of mouth below; frontal 
impressions deep, subpunctiform or curving 
toward eyes posteriorly; mentum toothed; 
ligula rounded, 2-setose; paraglossae at- 
tached to ligula but longer, with narrowly 
rounded apices; penultimate segments labial 
palpi with more than 2 setae anteriorh'. 
Prothorax as in Trieliotiehnus. Elytra: 
sutural angles denticulate ( in New Ciuinean 
species); striae entire; sutural striae long; 
3rd intervals seriate-punctate. Inner winiis 
full. LeiS,s: tarsi slender. Secondary .sexual 
characters: see Descriptions of species. 

Ty))e species. llypolitJius perlueens Bates, 
of Kashmir, etc. (fixed In- Andrewes, 1939). 

Generic distribution. India and Ceylon, 
Sikkini, Burma, etc., to Java, Borneo, 
Philippines (Negros), Cele]>es, Burn, 
Moliiecas (Amboina), New (Guinea, Solo- 
mons, New Hebrides, and ihc Cape York 
Pen. of Australia (occurrence in Philii")- 
pines. New Hebrides, and Australia bas(>d 
on unpublished records ) . 

Notes. Members of this genus seem to 
be rare insects, usualK' taken onl\ one or 
two indi\iduals at a time, although the\ 
are winged and IK to light. I do not know 
their habitat. 

Key io Species of Coleolisscs of 
Ni:\\ (".riNKA 

I. Onter an,ul(\s of cKtia not (Iclincd. hroaill) 
ronndecl (p. 65) jHijitui 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



65 



- Outer angles of elytra ( before subapical 
sinuations) well defined, right or obtuse (p. 
65 ) angulatns 

Coleolissus papua n, sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 26, large, broad; lilack, 
appendages irregularly reddish piceous; 
very shining, elytra iridescent. Head 0.73 
and 0.72 width prothorax; front faintly 
punctulate. Prothorax transverse; width/ 
length 1.54 and 1.56; base/apex c. 1.11 and 
1.11; sides broadly rounded to rounded 
posterior angles; lateral margins broader 
and more depressed posteriorly; apex mar- 
gined, base indistinctly so; disc depressed; 
baso-lateral impressions broad but poorly 
defined, closely punctate; other parts of 
disc sparsely or not punctulate. Elytra 
wide; width elytra prothorax 1.30 and 1.39; 
base margined; humeri rounded; outer sub- 
apical angles rounded; apices slightly sinu- 
ate before denticulate sutural angles; striae 
impunctate; intervals slightly convex, finely 
sparsely (scarcely detectably) punctulate, 
3rd with c. 7 small punctures irregularly 
spaced along most of length of inner edge. 
Lower siwface: prosternum and abdomen 
with a little fine, short, sparse pubescence 
(scarcely detectable); prosternal process 
setose. Secondary sexual characters: S un- 
known; 9 with 2 setae each side last 
ventral segment. Measurements: length 
12.5-13.5; width 4.8-5.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Kiunga, Fly R., Papua (W. W. Brandt); 
and 1 9 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,384) from Hollandia area, VV. Sentani, 
Cyclops Mts., West N. G., 150-250 m, June 
23, 1959 (T. C. Maa). 

Notes. This species is close to Coleolissus 
leveri Van Emden of the Solomons ( I have 
a specimen compared with the type) and 
even closer to C. kalisi Louwerens of Celebes 
( I have 2 paratypes received by courtesy of 
Mr. Louwerens). The New Guinean insect 
is slightly larger and broader than kalisi, 
with broader baso-lateral prothoracic im- 
pressions. I collected a single specimen of a 



Coleolissus very similar to pai)ua on the 
Cape York Pen., Australia, in 1958. 

Coleolissus angulatus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 27; black, elytra subirides- 
cent, appendages reddish brown. Head 0.72 
and 0.72 width prothorax; front virtually 
impunctate. Prothorax transverse-subcor- 
date; width/length 1.51 and 1.56; base/apex 
1.12 and 1.09; sides converging but usually 
not sinuate (sometimes slightly so) before 
± rounded posterior angles; lateral margins 
moderately broad and reflexed; apex mar- 
gined, base not; disc weakly convex, baso- 
lateral impressions not sharply defined, 
rather closely but irregularly punctate; disc 
otherwise less closely but extensively punc- 
tate especially across base and at sides, 
scarcely punctate at middle. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 1.30 and 1.32; basal mar- 
gin entire, vaguely obtusely angulate at 
humeri; outer apical angles well defined, 
usually right, sometimes obtuse; sutural 
angles denticulate; striae deep, impunctate; 
intervals slightly irregular but not distinctly 
punctate, 3rd with c. 7 very small punctures 
irregularly spaced on inner edge along 
most of length of intei^vals. Lower suiiace: 
prosternum not pubescent except for setae 
at apex of prosternal process; abdomen not 
pubescent except for usual "fixed" setae. 
Secondary sexual characters: $ front tarsi 
moderately dilated, middle tarsi scarcely 
so, both pairs 2-seriately squamulose; 2 
setae each side last ventral segment in 
both sexes. Measurements: length c. 7.5- 
8.5; width 3.1-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,385) and 2 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. N-E. N. G.: 
3, Finschhafen, 10 and 180 m, Apr. 9-16, 
1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Aitape, Aug. 1944 
(Darlington). West N. G.: 2, Hollandia 
area, W. Sentani, Cyclops Mts., 150-250 m, 
June 25, 1959 (Gressitt and T. C. Maa, 
Bishop Mus.); 1, Ifar, Cyclops Mts., 150- 



66 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



500 m, Sept. 6-9, 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, "Neth. 
New Guinea" without further loeality, Dec. 
10, 1944 (T. Aarons, California Acad.). 

Measured specimens. The <:5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. The deep elytral striation and 
sharply defined outer elytral angles well 
characterize this Coleolissus. The Dobodura 
specimens were, I think, taken at light, and 
some specimens from other localities are 
evidently from light trap material. 

Genus HYPHAEREON Macleay 

Macleay 1825, Annulosa Javanica, p. 22. 
Andrewes 1919, Trans. Ent. Soc. London for 

1919, p. 156. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 

p. 1221 (see for additional references). 

Diapiosis. Among New Guinean Har- 
palina this genus is recognizable by: form 
rather NebrioAike; elytra with series of 
(small) punctures on inner edge 3rd inter- 
vals; only 1 seta each side last ventral seg- 
ment in both sexes. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
c. Nehria-like, convex; reticulate micro- 
sculpture faint or absent on head and 
pronotum, fine and transverse ( ± visible at 
50x ) on elytra; elytra subiridescent. Head: 
eyes moderate, narrowly separated from 
mouth below; mentum toothed; ligula sub- 
truncate, 2-setose; paraglossae rounded, at- 
tached to but longer than ligula. Frothorax 
subcordate; anterior marginal line fine but 
usually entire. Elytra with margins sinuate 
before apex; striae entire; 3rd intervals 
seriate-punctate. Inner uini!,s: see under 
species. Secondary sexual characters: i 
front and middle tarsi slightly dilated, 2- 
seriately squamulose; 1 seta each side apex 
last ventral segment in both sex(\s. 

Type species. II. reflexus Macleay, of 
Java. 

Generic distrihtition. Known from Su- 
matra, Java, Flores, Celebes, and New 
(riiinea (not Australia). 

Notes. Of the 3 New Guinean species of 
Ilyphaercon, timid us is most like the type 
species, with whicli I shall compare it (in 



Notes under timidus). Calathomijnus, which 
resembles Ilyphaercon in form and in having 
only 1 pair of setae on the last ventral 
segment in both sexes, and which also oc- 
curs in the Malay Archipelago (but not 
New Guinea ) , is probably closely related 
to Hyphacreon but differs in having strongly 
angulate humeri. 

Key to Species of Hyphaereon of 
New Guinea 

1. Humeral margins broadly evenly rounded; 
elytral striae shallow, inter\'als flat; setae of 
apical ventral segment distant from margin 
by more than ^/io length of segment (p. 
66 ) levis 

- Humeral margins obtusely subangulate; elytral 
striae deeper; setae of last ventral segment 
less than %o length of segment from margin - 2 

2. Prothorax less cordate, with slightly broader 
base (width of base/width of head 1.20 and 
1.17); wings dimorphic, often much reduced; 
lowland-living (p. 67) timidus 

- Prothorax more cordate, with narrower base 
(width of base of prothorax/ width of head 
1.14 and 1.12); wings large, folded; moun- 
tain-living (p. 68) cordcHfi 

Hyphaereon levis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
fonn ( Fig. 28 ) average; black, legs testa- 
ceous, antennae and mouthparts brown. 
Head 0.67 and 0.66 width prothorax. 
Prothorax subcord;ite-subquadrate; wddth 
length 1.38 and 1.38; base/apex 1.19 and 
1.16; base/head 1.10 and 1.07; sides con- 
verging and very slightly sinuate before 
obtuse, blunted posterior angles; baso-kit- 
eral impressions poorh' defined; disc ex- 
tensively pimctate especially across base 
and at apex, almost impunctate across mid- 
dle. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.26 
and 1.26; details ;is usu;il in genus except 
humeral margins broadly evenly rounded; 
striae entire^ but less deep than usual, hmer 
u'inis,s lull in both specimens. Measure- 
ments: l(Migth c. 9.0; ^^■idth 3.3-3.4 mm. 

Types. Ilolotvpe $ (Leiden Mus. ) and 
1 5 "paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,386) 
both from Sibil, Star Rge., West N. G.. 
1260 in, |une 1959 (Neth. New Gnincvi 
Kxp.). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



67 



Notes. For comparisons, see preceding 
Key. 

Hyphaereon timidus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 29) of small, rather broad 
Nebria; black or piceous, appendages testa- 
ceous, antennae in part brown. Head 0.64 
and 0.65 width prothorax. Prothorax sub- 
cordate-subquadrate; width /length 1.42 and 
1.39; base/apex 1.20 and 1.17; base/head 
1.20 and 1.17; sides converging and usually 
slightly, broadly sinuate before obtuse, 
slightly blunted posterior angles; anterior 
marginal line entire or not (variation in- 
dividual); baso-lateral impressions poorly 
defined; disc finely irregularly punctate 
basally, c. impunctate elsewhere. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.19 and 1.23; 
humeri obtusely but usually distinctly angu- 
late; striae deep, intervals convex. Wings 
dimorphic or polymorphic (see Notes, be- 
low). Secondary sexual characters as for 
genus. Measurements: length c. 6-7; 
width 2.6-2.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,387) and 55 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 20 
paratvpes from Oro Bay (near Dobodura), 
Dec. 'l943-Jan. 1944 (Darlington). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 17, 
Nadzab, July 1944 (Darhngton); 1, same 
locahty, June 1944 (Krombein, U.S.N.M.); 
1, Erima, Astrolabe Bay, 1896 (Biro); 1, 
Busu R., "12 km," Sept. 21, 1956 (E. J. 
Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.). West N. G.: 34, 
Hollandia, July-Sept. 1944 ( Darlington ) ; 6, 
same locality. May 1945 (B. Malkin, 
U.S.N.M.); 5, Sabron, Cyclops Mts., 930 
ft. (c. 280 m), Apr. 1936 \ Cheesman ) . 

Measured specimens. The £ holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This new species is similar to 
Hyphaereon reflexus Macleay (the type 
species of the genus) of Java, but timidus 
differs slightb' in proportions (e.g., the 
base of the prothorax is relatively narrower 
than in reflexus) and the pronotum of 
timidus is less extensively punctate. 



The wings of this species vary (Figs. 29, 
A, B), and the variation is complex, being 
partly individual, partly geographic, and 
partly correlated with Iwdy size. Of the 
specimens from Dobodura, 5 have wings 
large and folded at apex; 51, strongly re- 
duced. However, both the long- and the 
short-winged forms are variable in the 
Dobodura series. Among the long-winged 
individuals, some have wings about 10% 
shorter than others and with slightly weak- 
ened venation, and among the short-winged 
ones, the wing vestiges vary from about % 
to about V2 the length of an elytron. In 
the series from Oro Bay (only a few miles 
from Dobodura) the proportion of long- 
and short-winged individuals is different: 
10 are long-winged, 9 short-winged. Seven- 
teen specimens from Nadzab and 3 from 
other localities in N-E. N. G. are all fully 
winged or at least have wings long and 
folded at apex. But my series from Hol- 
landia is again dimorphic: 7 specimens 
are long-winged, 27 short-winged. All the 
long-winged specimens from Dobodura, Oro 
Bay, and Hollandia are large. Some short- 
winged individuals are equally large, but 
there is much more variation in size among 
the short-winged ones. I do not remember 
noting this correlation in any other Ca- 
rabidae. I have not studied state of wings 
in specimens not collected by myself be- 
cause I do not know how they were taken, 
and method of collecting may have favored 
getting one wing class more than another. 

It is doubtful if even the long-winged 
form of this species flies. Individuals are 
common at some localities where much 
collecting has been done, but few have 
been obtained except by myself (on the 
ground), and no specimen is labeled as 
taken at light. The variation and use of 
wings in this species would be an interesting 
subject for study in the field. 

Although my field notes are scanty, I 
think my series of this species were taken 
among dead leaves and vegetation on the 
ground near water. 



68 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Hyphaereon cordons n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form N ebria -\ike; black or piceous, append- 
ages irregularly brown, darker than in other 
species. Head 0.67 and 0.67 width pro- 
thorax. ProfJiora.x cordate; width/length 
1.35 and 1.43; base apex 1.23 and 1.18; 
base/head 1.14 and 1.12; sides converging 
and broadly sinuate before slightly obtuse 
(almost right), slightly blunted posterior 
angles. Elytra c. %o or more wider than pro- 
thorax (elytra prothorax 1.32 and 1.32); 
humeri ± subangulate; striae deep, intervals 
convex. Win^is fully developed, or at least 
long and folded at apex, in all specimens. 
Seconckiry se.xual cJiaracters as for genus. 
Measurements: length c. 7-8.5; width 2.7- 
3.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype £ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,388) and 77 paratypes all from Chimbu 
Vy., Bismarck Rge., N-E. N. G., 5000-7500 
ft. (c. 1500-2300 m), Oct. 1944 (Dar- 
lington ) . 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 1, 
Kainantu, 1650 m, Oct. 20-26, 1959 (T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1, Wau, Morobe Dist., 
1200 m, Dec. 4-5, 1961 (Sedlacek), in 
mercury vapor light trap. 

Measured specimens. The <^ holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. Although this species is evidently 
sometimes common, and although all speci- 
mens are fully winged, they are rarely 
taken in light traps, which suggests that 
even this winged species rarely flies. 
Whether it is a real species or a local form 
of timidus is not possible to say from 
museum specimens. In any case it is 
clearly distinguishable as indicated in the 
preceding Key. 

Genus ANOPLOGENIUS Chaudoir 

Chaiuloir 1852, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 25, 1, p. 

88. 
Csiki 1932, Colcop. Cat., Carabidae, liarpaliiiae 6, 

p. 1236. 
Schauberger 1937, Ent. Rundscbau 54, p. 272. 
Basilewsky 1951, Ann. Mus. Congo Belj^c (8), 

Zoo!., 9, p. 122 (see for synonymy and additional 

refcronces). 



Diagnosis. Relatively large Acupalpina; 
anterior marginal line of pronotum entire 
and deeply impressed; scutellar striae ab- 
sent. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Stenoloplius alaccr Dejean, 
of Africa. 

Generic distribution. The warmer parts 
of the Old World; in the Oriental-Aus- 
tralian area, from China and Japan to 
northern Australia. 

Notes. The species of this genus are 
among the most aquatic of Carabidae, oc- 
curring as a rule in vegetation that is float- 
ing in water. They are active and winged 
and are common in some places, including 
the Philippines, although unaccountably 
rare or local in New Guinea. 

Anoplogenius marginafus (Macleay) 

Macleay 1888, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South 
Wales (2) 3, p. 472 (HarpJancr). 

?iticisus Andrewes 1926, Ann. Mat;. Nat. Hist. (9) 
18, p. 279. 

?poJitus Schauberger 1937, Ent. Rundschau 54, p. 
273. 

Description. None needed here. See 
Notes below; length c. 6.5-8.0 mm. 

Types. Of murginattis, from King's 
Sound, Australia; probably in Macleay 
Mus., Sydney (not seen). Of incisus, from 
Fort de Kock, Sumatra; in Briti.sh Mus. 
(seen). Of politus, from "Tigerinsel (New 
Guinea)" (? = Matjan, Pulau-Pulau, which 
is really not off New Guinea but south of 
Celebes); in Stockholm Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. The only 
(supposedly) New Guinean specimens of 
Anoplogenius known to me are: 1 labeled 
simply "Papua," presumably collected by 
Biro, now in Hungarian National Mus.; 
scNcral Irom "Dorey, New (Guinea," pre- 
sumabK- collected by Wallace and perhaps 
actual]) from Celebes (see Part I of the 
present work, pp. 330-331); and the types 
ol ])olHus from "Tigerinsel," probably off 
(Celebes rather (liaii New (Guinea. 

Notes. The Oriental- Australian species of 
Anoplogenius are taxonomicalK difficult at 
b(\st, and in the case of this New (Uiinean 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



69 



species the difficulty is increased by lack 
of adequate material and by doubt about 
localities, as indicated above. The three 
authors concerned published their descrip- 
tions without reference to each other, but 
Andrewes and Schauberger both compared 
their species with A. cyanescens Hope, and 
Macleay's Harplaner marginatus is appar- 
ently an Anoplogenius near cyanescens (B. 
P. Moore, personal communication, 1965). 
I therefore tentatively conclude that incisus, 
politiis, and marginatus are probably all 
one species which ranges at least from 
Sumatra to New Guinea and northern 
Australia. This species is narrowly or 
indistinctly pale-margined, with relatively 
distinct (narrowly rounded) posterior pro- 
thoracic angles, and with baso-lateral im- 
pressions of pronotum extensively punc- 
tate. I have specimens with these charac- 
ters from Morotai Island in the Moluccas, 
and from Townsville and Rockhampton, 
Australia. 

Genus EGADROMA Motschulsky 

Motschulsky 1855, fitude Ent. 4, p. 43. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidac, Harpalinae 6, 

p. 1239 (as subgenus of Actipalpus) (see for 

additional references ) . 
Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part 2, p. 699. 
Basilewsky 1951, Ann. Miis. Congo Beige (8), 

Zoo!., 9, p. 144. 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Harpalini 
of New Guinea. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Carabus smaragduhis Fab- 
ricius, below. 

Generic distribution. The warmer parts 
of the Old World: Africa and Madagas- 
car ( 1 species reaching the Mediterranean 
part of Europe); southern Asia north to 
Japan, and across the Malay Archipelago 
to the Philippines and Australia. 

Notes. The Oriental-Australian species of 
Egadroma are exceptionally difficult. They 
are closely related or at least very similar 
among themselves; they vary geographically 
and individually; and some species are 
widely distributed and very common, so 



that many specimens fell into the hands of 
early taxonomists who described them in- 
adequately and failed to understand their 
interrelationships. I do not pretend fully 
to understand them now, but can make 
the following comments on the species that 
occur in New Guinea. Three common 
species occur there, distinguishable by both 
external and genitallic characters. (A fourth, 
endemic species is known from a single ? . ) 
All three are widely distributed outside 
New Guinea and at least two of them have 
received different names in different places. 
To fix the synonymy of these species out- 
side New Guinea would be a major, time- 
consuming undertaking, and is beyond my 
power now. I shall therefore simply use 
for each species the name that I think ap- 
plies in New Guinea, with tentative notes 
on synonymies. 

Although I did not always distinguish 
the species in the field, my notes suggest 
that quinquepustulata and smaragdula oc- 
cur in wet places usually by standing water, 
but that robusta occurs principally in drier 
habitats, especially under cover in open 
grassland. All these species are winged, 
and all fly to light. 

Key to Species of Egadroma of New Guinea 

1. Size larger (c. 6-7 mm); elytra conspicu- 
ously 3- or 5-maculate, and very shining; 

apex of aedeagus long (p. 70 ) 

quinquepustulata 

- Usually smaller (less than 6 mm, except in 
Cyclops); usually with reduced or no mark- 
ings, and often ( not always ) less shining; 
apex of aedeagus shorter (except unknown 
in Cyclops) 2 

2. Large (7.4 mm) (p. 70) cyclops 

- Smaller ( less than 6 mm ) _., 3 

3. Form relatively narrower, with relatively 
wider head ( head usually more than 0.74 
width prothorax, prothoracic width/length 
usually less than 1.45); elytra rather strongly 
iridescent; aedeagus finely notched at sides 
(p. 70) smaragdula 

- Broader, with relatively narrower head (head 
usually less than 0.74 width prothorax, pro- 
thoracic width/length usually more than 
1.45); elytra less iridescent, usually with 
distinct microreticulation; aedeagus not 
notched at sides (p. 71) robusta 



70 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoolofiy, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Egadroma quinquepusfulafa (Wiedemann) 

Spiistiilatiis- Wiedemann 1823, Zoologisches Maga- 

zin (2) 1, p. 58 (Badi.stcr) . 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caral)idae, Harpalinae 

6, p. 1240 (see for additional references). 
Habu 1961, in Kira and ITniesao, Nature and Life 

in Southeast Asia (Kyoto) 1, p. 276, fig. 4 

( <5 genitalia ) . 

Description. None needed here; see pre- 
ceding Key to Species and following Notes; 
length c. 6-7 mm. 

Type(sj. From Bengal, India; in Copen- 
hagen U. Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Widely dis- 
tributed at low altitudes, fairly common: 
41 specimens from localities over most of 
the length of New Guinea (Papua to the 
Vogelkop); most at low altitudes, but 1, 
Chimbu Vy., Bismarck Bge., 5000-7500 ft. 
(c. 1500-2300 m), and 1, Wau, 1200 m. 

Notes. This relatively large, clearly 
marked, and therefore comparatively easily 
recognized Efradroma ranges from SE. 
Asia including Japan and Formosa across 
the Malay Archipelago to North Queens- 
land, Australia. In the past, the species 
has often been treated as a variety of 
smaraiiduki but it is unquestionably distinct 
by genitallic as well as external characters. 

Specimens from New Guinea vary in 
elytral markings, the variation being in- 
dividual, not geographic. Conspicuous post- 
humeral pale spots are always present, and 
a variable (sometimes Faint) subapical 
sutural mark is always present too, but 
antcapical spots on the 7th and 8th intervals 
are variably developed and often absent. 

Egadroma cyclops n. sp. 

Descri])lio)i. Form as in T'igure 30, larg(\ 
broad; side margins of j^rothorax testaceous- 
translucent, ol elytra scarcely so; append- 
ages reddish testaceous, antennae darker 
from 3rd segment; shining, front with iso- 
diametric reticulate microsculpture, discs 
of pronotum and elytra not visibly micro- 
reticulale (at 5()X ) but moderately irides- 
cent. Head 0.6.S width prothorax; formed 
as usual in genus. Prothorax transverse; 



width length 1.45; base/apex 1.22; sides 
rounded, with moderate reflexed margins; 
basal angles rounded; base not margined, 
apical marginal line interrupted at middle; 
baso-lateral impressions broad, shallow, c. 
rugose-punctate, with punctation finer and 
sparser at middle of base. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.33; humeri prominent 
but rounded; striae deep, impunctate; 
scutellar striae long; intervals finely sparsely 
punctulate, 3rd with 1 puncture on inner 
edge less than % from apex. Winii,s full. 
Lower surface: prostemum with some short 
pubescence; abdomen not pubescent at 
apex. Secondary sexual cJiaractcrs: i un- 
known, 9 normal. Measurements: length 
7.4; width 3.3 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Hollandia area, W. Sentani, Cyclops Mts.. 
West N. G., 50-100 m (Gressitt and T. C. 
Maa), in light trap. 

Notes. This new species resembles 
smaraiidula but is larger (a large smaragdula 
is less than 6 mm long), with relatively 
narrower head. I feel sure it is a distinct 
species although reprc-sented b\- onl>- a 
single 9 specimen. 

Egadroma smaragdula (Fabricius) 

Fabricius 1798, SuppUineutuni Eut. Systematicac. 

p. 60 (Camhits). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6. 

p. 1241 (see for additional references). 
Jedlicka 1935, Acta Soe. Ent. Czechoslovakia 32, 

p. 1 13 (in key). 
Habu 1961, in Kira and Umesao, Nature and Lite 

in Southeast Asia (Kyoto) 1, p. 275, fig. 3 ( S 

genitalia). 

Descri))liou. None required here; see 
preceding Key to Species: k-ngth ± 5 mm. 

Typc(s). From "India ori«Milali"; in 
CoiXMihagen V\n\. Mus. (not sec-n). 

Occurrciu-e in New Guinea. Common at 
low altitud(\s probably throughout New 
(i^uinea: 121 specimens from Miln(> Ba\ 
and Port Moresb>- to the X'ogelkop; most at 
low altitudes but 2 from Wau and 1 from 
Rattan Ciuup at 1200 in. 

Notes. This is the common, unmarked 
(at most with a faint rufesc(Mit area along 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 71 



suture posteriorly) Egadroma of the Ori- 
ental-Australian area. It apparently ex- 
tends from Asia to northern Australia but, 
liecause of difficulty in distinguishing it 
from similar forms, I have not tried to fix 
the exact limits of its range. 

Egadroma robusta Sloane 

Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, p. 

469. 
Andrewes 1927, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) 19, p. 

110 (as synonym of dingo Castelnau). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 

p. 1242 (as synonym of vestigialis) . 

Description. None required here. See 
preceding Key to Species and Notes, be- 
low; length ± 5 mm. 

Types. From Gazelle Pen., New Britain; 
should now be in Deutsches Ent. Mus., 
Berlin-Dahlem (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Very com- 
mon throughout New Guinea at low alti- 
tudes: 368 specimens from many localities 
from Milne Bay and Normanby, Ferguson, 
Rossel, and Sudest Islands, Papua, to west- 
ern part of West N. G. Although this species 
does not commonly occur at altitudes of 
more than a iew hundred meters, I ha\e 
seen 4 from Wau, 1200 m, and 1, Chimbu 
Vy., 5000-7500 ft. (c. 1500-2300 m). Speci- 
mens have been collected in every month. 

Notes. Most individuals of this species 
from New Guinea have the elytra un- 
marked or with only small posthumeral 
pale marks on the 6th intei^vals, rarely 
extending to the 5th and 7th intervals. 
Similar unmarked individuals occur in New 
Britain (types of robusta) and Cape York, 
Australia (collected by me in 1958). 
However, a few specimens from New 
Guinea, mostly from the far west including 
Biak Island, have also pale subapical 
sutural dashes and variable subapical pale 
spots, best developed on the 7th intervals. 
These specimens may be referable to 
Egadroma quadrimaculata (Macleay), which 
was described from Australia, but which 
may extend across the Malay Archipelago 
at least to Java. In other words, robusta 



may be an unspotted form ( occurring prin- 
cipally but not exclusively on New Guinea ) 
of a more widely distributed maculate 
species, tentatively identified as quadrimac- 
ulata Macleay. This case requires further 
study. 

Most individuals of robusta are easily 
separable from smaragdula by proportions 
(indicated in the preceding Key) and 
duller surface. Apparent intermediates do, 
rarely, occur. I do not know whether they 
are hybrids or individual variants. These 
two species probably occupy different habi- 
tats: smaragdula, wet places; robusta, rel- 
atively dry ones. 

Genus STENOLOPHUS Stephens 

Stephens 1828, iHustrations British Ent., Man- 

dibulata 1, pp. 67, 165. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

6, p. 1259 (see for synonymy and additional 

references ) 
Jeanne] 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part2, p. 693. 
Basilewsky 1951, Ann. Mus. Congo Beige (8), 

Zool., 9, pp. 118, 213 (in text). 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Harpalini 
of New Gui7iea. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Carabus teutonus Schrank, 
of Europe, etc. (see Jeannel, 1942). 

Generic distribution. Eurasia and North 
America, and probably the Oriental Re- 
gion and Malay Archipelago to Australia; 
(probably not Africa below the Sahara, al- 
though closely related genera occur there). 
See Notes, below. 

Notes. Jeannel and Basilewsky have 
divided Stenolophus, and Basilewsky sug- 
gests that the genus in a strict sense may be 
confined to the Holarctic Regions. How- 
ever, the following t\\'o New Guinean 
species seem to fit reasonably well in 
Stenolophus according to characters given 
by Basilewsky (1951, p. 213). Moreover, 
one of these two species (gonidius) has 
the first segment of the posterior tarsi 
plainly carinate while the other (volucer) 
has not, which suggests that this character, 
which has been used in dividing St e nolo- 



72 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



phus, is less important than has been 
thought. I shall therefore leave both New 
Guinean species in Stenolophus, where in 
fact earlier authors put them. 

Both the following two species are ap- 
parently widely distributed in the Malay 
Archipelago, and I have specimens prob- 
ably representing both from North Queens- 
land, Australia, but because of doubt about 
identifications I prefer not to state their 
distributions in detail. 

Key to Species of Stenolophus of 
New Guinea 

1. Sides of prothorax sinuate before base, with 
liasal angles nearly right and scarcely blunted 
(p. 72) volucer 

- Sides of prothorax c. straight, converging 
but not or scarcely sinuate posteriorly, with 
basal angles obtuse, narrowly rounded (p. 
72 ) gonidiiis 

Stenolophus volucer Andrewes 

Andrewes 1930, Arkiv for Zoologi 21A, No. 29, p. 
5. 

Description. None required here; length 
c. 5.5-6.0 mm. 

Types. Five, from Sumatra; actual 
"type" in Stockholm Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neio Guinea. Papua: 52 
specimens from various localities, including 
a series from Dobodura. N-E. N. G.: 1, 
Nadzab, Julv 1944 (Darlington). West 
N. G.: 1, River Tor (mouth) 4 km E. 
Hoi Maffen, July 19, 1959 (T. C. Maa, 
Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. See Notes under the genus. I 
have identified this species from descrip- 
tion, and am not ((uite sure of it. It is, as 
Andrewes says, about the si/c and color of 
ii^onidius (below) but with lateral borders 
of elytra darker and with differently formed 
prothorax. 

Stenolophus gonidius Bates 

Bates 1890, Ann. Mus. C:iv. Ceiioa 27, p. 101. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 

p. 1262 (see for additional references). 
Andrewes 1933, Cat. Carabidae Sumatra, p. 317. 

Description. None required here- l(>ngth 
c. 5.5-6.5 mm. 



Types. From Burma; in Genoa Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 31 
specimens from Dobodura, Oro Bay, Port 
Moresby, Fly R., and Ferguson Is. N-E. 
N. G.: 1, Finschhafen, Huon Pen., 80 m, 
Apr. 16, 1963 (Sedlacek), in Malaise trap. 
( No specimens from ^^^est N.G. ) 

Notes. See Notes under the genus. Al- 
though I have seen a cotype of gonidius 
in the British Museum and have made com- 
parisons with it, I am not quite sure of the 
identity of the New Guinean specimens. 

Genus ACUPALPUS Latreille 

Latreille 1829, in Cuvier, Regne Animal, ed. 2, 

4, p. 391. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 6, 

pp. 1238, 1242. 
Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiqucs, 

Part 2, p. 712. 
Basilewsky 1951, Ann. Mus. Congo Beige (8), 

Zool., 9, pp. 232, 233. 

Diap,nosis. See preceding Key to Genera 
of UarpaJini of Neic Guinea and following 
Notes. I ha\'e tentatively assigned to this 
genus all the small Harpalini of New 
Guinea ( 6 species ) that possess lonii, 
sparse prosternal setae. All are winged. 
The front tarsi of the S are not or at most 
(in furvinus) slightly dilated, with squamae 
thin, transparent, difficult to detect, and 
perhaps absent in some cases. 

Description. None required here. 

Type .■species. Carahus nicridianus Lin- 
naeus, of Europe. 

Generic distribution. Now considered to 
include all principal regions of the world. 
but the generic classification of these small 
Harpalini is not lully worked out. At least 
3 stocks of this genus reach nortliern tropi- 
cal Australia, but the\ aiiparenth' do not 
extend far into southern tempcMate Aus- 
tralia, where tluMr place is taken In small 
species of Lccanonwrtis (see discussion un- 
der Tribe Harpalini). 

Notes. Several species ol this genus (>ither 
range widely in the Oriental-Australian area 
or b(4()ng to wide-ranging groujis of closely 
interrelaled species. Their nomenclature is 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 73 



difficult, and synonymies outside New 
Guinea remain to be determined. 

Key to Species of Acu palpus of 
New Guinea 

1. Anterior margin of clypeus not notched or 
impressed at sides ( at most slightly sinuate ) ; 
base of prothorax c. squarely truncate, with 
posterior angles c. rectangular 2 

- Anterior margin of clypeus notched or im- 
pressed at sides; posterior angles of prothorax 
usually more obtuse or rounded . 3 

2. Larger (c. 3.7 mm); elytral margins behind 
humeri faintly serrate at 50 X ( P- 73) __ cxactus 

- Smaller (c. 2.7 mm); elytral margins not 
visibly serrate at 50x (p- 73) -- exactellus 

3. Prothorax with baso-lateral impressions not 
punctate; posterior angles (narrowly) roimded 
(p. 74) ftirvinus 

- Prothorax with baso-lateral impressions punc- 
tate; posterior angles usually more distinct ^ 4 

4 Color brown with darker head; prothorax 
with base more oblique at sides and posterior 
angles more obtuse (p. 74) hrunnicolor 

- Color darker, more uniform; prothorax with 
base less oblique at sides and basal angles 
more nearly right 5 

5. Smaller (3.0-3.3 mm) (p. 75) ustus 

- Larger (3.5-4.2 mm) (p. 75) papiia 

Acupalpus exactus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 31 ) relatively slender, elytra 
subparallel; piceous, clypeus etc. reddish, 
margins of prothorax rather broadly and 
indefinitely reddish, suture and margins of 
elytra narrowly but conspicuously reddish, 
appendages testaceous; shining, dorsal 
microsculpture faint or absent. Head 0.84 
and 0.85 width prothorax; eyes large, promi- 
nent; frontal impressions deep, converging 
anteriorly, ending at deep clypeal suture; 
anterior margin of clypeus slightly sinuate 
but not distinctly notched at sides; man- 
dibles long; mentum not toothed; ligula 
slender, free at apex, 2-setose; paraglossae 
slightly longer than ligula, narrowly 
rounded; palpi with apical segments sub- 
conical. Prothorax broadly subcordate; 
width/length 1.34 and 1.30; base/apex 1.10 
and 1.07; sides broadly rounded anteriorly, 
slightly converging and broadly sinuate to 
c. right, sharply defined posterior angles; 
base and apex not margmed; lateral mar- 



gins moderate, not crenulate; baso-lateral 
impressions large, deep, irregular but not 
distinctly punctate; disc normal, impressed 
median line groove-like at base. Elytra 
long; width elytra/prothorax 1.47 and 1.52; 
humeri prominent but rounded; margins 
behind humeri visibly serrate (at 50x); 
striae deep, entire; intervals convex, 3rd 
with puncture on inner edge well behind 
middle. Measurements: length c. 3.7; 
width 1.4-1.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,389) from Hollandia, West N. G., July- 
Sept. 1944 (Darlington); and 1 9 paratype 
(Bishop Mus.) from Kiunga, Fly R., Papua, 
July 15-21, 1957 (W. W. Brandt); 1 para- 
type, Popondetta, Papua, 25 m. May 1966 
( Shanahan-Lippert, Bishop Mus.), light 
trap. 

Notes. This New Guinean species resem- 
bles and is probably related to Acupalpus 
horni Andre wes of SE. Asia but is darker, 
with lateral margins of prothorax not 
crenulate (faintly crenulate in horni), and 
with baso-lateral impressions of pronotum 
less linear. Other apparently related forms 
occur in the Philippines, Moluccas ( Morotai 
Is.), and North Queensland in Austraha. 

Acupalpus exactellus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
smaller and relatively shorter than exactus 
( above ) ; piceous, margins of prothorax and 
elytra not or not conspicuously paler, ap- 
pendages testaceous; moderately shining, 
reticulate microsculpture (slightly trans- 
verse ) visible on front anteriorly but absent 
on discs of prothorax and elytra. Head 0.75 
and 0.76 width prothorax; eyes relatively 
much smaller than in exactus, with genae 
more oblique; front similarly impressed; 
clypeus without distinct notches at sides 
anteriorly; mouthparts as in exactus. Pro- 
thorax broadly subcordate with wide base; 
width length 1.40 and 1.42; base/apex 1.24 
and 1,16; sides broadly arcuate, slightly 
converging and broadly sinuate to c. rec- 
tangular posterior angles; base and apex 
not margined; lateral margins narrow an- 



74 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



teriorly, l:)ioader posteriorly, not crenulate; 
baso-lateral impressions broad, deep, ir- 
regular, but not distinctly punctate; disc 
normal, with middle line deeply impressed 
basally. Elytra: \\'idth elytra prothorax 
1.41 and 1.45; humeri broad but rounded; 
margin behind humeri not visibly serrate 
(at 50x ); striae and dorsal punctures as in 
exacttis. Secondary sexual characters: S 
front tarsi not dilated and apparently with- 
out squamae ( see Notes, below ) . Measure- 
uicuts: length c. 2.7; width 1.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,390) and 1 9 paratype from Hollandia, 
West N. G., July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. So far as I know, the only species 
with which the present one need be com- 
pared is exacttis (above), with which com- 
parison is made in the Key and preceding 
Description. 

Although the type is a $ ( dissected ) , the 
anterior tarsi are slender and without the 
expected squamae, so far as I can deter- 
mine under highest power of my stereo- 
scopic microscope. 

Acupalpus furvinus n. sp. 

Descri])tion. With characters of genus; 
form rather elongate; reddish piceous, 
sides of prothorax and suture and sidt\s of 
elytra morc^ reddish, appendages irregularly 
testaceous, antennae brownish except at 
base; shining, but front with light iso- 
diametric microsculpture, pronotum with 
more transverse microreticulations at most 
hiintly indicated, elytra with distinct trans- 
verse meshes (at 50x ) but sHghtK' irides- 
cent. Head 0.71 and 0.73 width prothorax; 
eyes moderate; front impressed as usual; 
clypeus with anterior margin notched or 
impressed at sides; mouthparts as in 
e.xactus. Prothorax subquadrate; width 
length 1.31 and 1.31; base/apex 1.10 and 
1.11; sides broadly rounded anteriorly, 
nearly straight (or slightly rounded) and 
converging posteriorly to narrowly round(>d 
posterior angles; base and apex not mar- 
gined; margins moderate, broader jioste- 
riorl\ and rniming into irregular, rounded. 



not distinctly punctate baso-lateral impres- 
sions; disc as usual. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.38 and 1.39; striae entire, well 
impressed; 3rd intervals 1-punctate on inner 
edge behind middle. Secondary .sexual char- 
acters: i front tarsi slightly dilated, 4th 
segments deeply emarginate, 4 segments 2- 
seriately squamulose. Measurements: length 
3.5-4.7; width 1.5-1.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,391 ) and 6 parat>'pes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 1, 
Lake Daviumbu, Flv R., Sept. 21-30, 1936 
(Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.). N-E. N. G.: 
1, Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured s))eci7nens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. According to my notes made at the 
British Museum in 1948, this species rep- 
resents a widely distributed Oriental-Aus- 
tralian group of Acupalpus which includes 
annarncnsis Bates and jurvus Andrewes of 
SE. Asia, as well as various named forms 
from the Malay Archipelago. Most of them 
are testaceous with dark elytral clouds, but 
jurvus is more uniformly colored, as is 
furvimis. However, the latter differs from 
jurvus in haxing more prominent eyes and 
less rounded posterior prothoracic angles. 
A representati\ e of this species group oc- 
curs in North Queensland, Australia. 

Acupalpus brunnicolor (Sloane) 

Sloane 1S98, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

23, p. 466 (Thcnarotcs). 
Andrewes 1930, Cat. Indian Inseets, Part 18, 

Caral)i(Iai', p. 10. 

Description (for recognition only). A 
brown Acupalpus characterized in preced- 
ing Key to Species: head 0.82 and 0.82 
widtli prothorax; prothoracic width length 
1.44 and 1.42, base apex 1.13 and 1.16; 
width elytra prothorax c. 1.43 and 1.38; 
length c. 3.8, width 1.5-1.6 nun. 

Types. From Behn Ri\er, Wcslcru Aus- 
tralia, collected 1)\' Helms; t\pe retinned 
to Lea, should be in Sonlh Australian Mns. 
(not secMi). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 75 



Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Papua: 3, 
Port Moresby, Oct. 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
Orionio River, Feb. 17, 1967 ("H. C," 
Bishop Mus.), light trap. 

Measured specimens. A pair ( c5 9 ) from 
Port Moresby. 

Notes. According to notes that I made 
at the British Museum in 1947-1948, brun- 
nicolor of Avistralia may be a form of a 
widely distributed species that has received 
the name sinuellus Bates in SE. Asia and 
punctafus Jedlicka in the Philippines. How- 
ever, the classification of these small har- 
palines is still so doubtful that I do not 
wish to declare synonymies, but shall say 
only that hrunnicolor probably represents a 
widely distributed species group that may 
have reached Australia recently (perhaps 
by way of the Lesser Sunda Islands) and 
that may then have spread from Australia 
to the Eucalyptus country of southern New 
Guinea. 

Acupalpus ustus Andrewes 

Andrewes 1930, Zool. Mededelingen 13, p. 195. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form rather stout; 
piceous, moderately shining. Head 0.76 
and 0.77 width prothorax; eyes average. 
Prothorax subcordate; width/length 1.38 
and 1.37; base apex 1.12 and 1.10; sides 
variably sinuate before obtuse (almost 
right) posterior angles; disc normal, baso- 
lateral impressions punctate, punctation ab- 
sent or sparse across middle of base. Elytra: 
width elytra/prothorax 1.43 and 1.44. Mea- 
surements (in New Guinea): length 3.0- 
3.3; width l..'3-1.4 mm. 

Types. From Sumatra and Borneo; the 
(holo)type, from Borneo, in Andrewes 
Coll., British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Papua: 29, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 
West N. G.: 1, Hollandia, July-Sept. 1944 
( Darlington ) . 

Measured specimens. A pair { i 9 ) from 
Dobodura. 

Notes. My identification is tentative, al- 



though based on comparison of specimens 
with the type. As in other species of this 
genus, I am not absolutely sure of synon- 
ymies and make none, but only state that 
this species appears to be widely distributed 
in the Malay Archipelago. 

Acupalpus papua n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 32) rather broad, with sides of 
elytra shghtly arcuate; piceous, apices of 
elytra sometimes rufescent, appendages 
testaceous, antennae browner from 3rd seg- 
ments; moderately shining, reticulate micro- 
sculpture distinct and c. isodiametric on 
front, faint ( and more transverse ) or absent 
on disc of pronotum, not visible (at 50x ) 
on slightly iridescent elytra. Head 0.82 and 
0.80 width prothorax; eyes moderate; frontal 
impressions extending onto clypeus; anterior 
edge of clypeus finely notched at sides; 
mouthparts c. as in exactus. Prothorax 
broadly subcordate; width/length 1.43 and 
1.46; base/apex 1.15 and 1.10; sides broadly 
rounded anteriorly, converging and slightly, 
broadly sinuate before slightly obtuse but 
well defined posterior angles; margins 
moderate anteriorly, broader posteriorly, 
with baso-lateral areas depressed and punc- 
tate, punctation not extending across middle 
of base. Elytra: \\'idth elytra/prothorax 
1.46 and 1.48; humeri broadly rounded; 
margins behind humeri not distinctly serrate 
at 50X; striae moderately impressed; 3rd 
intervals 1-punctate on inner edge as usual. 
Measurements: length 3.5-4.2; width 1.5- 
1.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,392) and 4 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (DarHngton); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 1, 
Oro Bay (near Dobodura), Dec. 1943-Jan. 
1944 (Darlington); 1, Fly R., Lake Davi- 
umbu, Sept. 1-10, 1936 (Archbold Exp., 
A.M.N.H.). West N. G.: 2, Hollandia, 
July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured specimens. The c^ holotype and 
1 ? paratype from Dobodura. 



76 BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



Notes. Except that it is close to tistiis 
( above ) , I cannot state the relationships of 
this new species. As compared with iistu-s, 
papim is larger, with relatively slightly 
w ider head and wider prothorax. 

Tribe ANAULACINI 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat. Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1287 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 283. 

MiLsoreini Auct. 

Andrewes 1930, Cat. Indian Carabidae, p. XIII. 

Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carabiques de la Region 
Malgache, Part 3, p. 860. 

Masorcitdc jeannel 1942, Fainie de France, Coleop. 
Carabiqnes, Part 2, p. 1012. 

Ma.sorcinac Basilewsky 1953, Exploration Pare Na- 
tional rUpeniba, Fasc. 10, Carabidae, pp. 17, 
118. 

This is a small, pan-tropical tribe of 
obscure ('arabidae some of which, includ- 
ing all those found in New Guinea, super- 
ficially resemble Nitidulidae. They may be 
recognized by appearance ( Figs. 33, 34 ) ; 
short, strongly arcuate, flattened mandibles; 
rather long tibial spurs; and other technical 
characters given by authors cited above. 
y\ll the species that I know are winged, 
and the widely distributed Aephnidius 
adelioides flies to light, but Odontomasoreus 
has not been taken at light and perhaps 
do(\s not fly. The few species that I have 
collected in New Guinea and Australia live 
in leaf litter on the ground in rain forest. 
Four genera of the tribe are known from 
New Guinea. 

Kkv to Genera of Anaulacini of 
New Guinea 

1. iiimicii dentate; (antennae short, not reacli- 
ing base of prothorax; labrnni rounded; 
mentnni lobed or snlidentate; chtra pale- 
spotted) (p. 76) Odoiilomd.soreus 

- Ilnnieri not dentate 2 

2. Antennae sliort, not reaching base of pro- 
tliorax (p. 77) Anaiilcicu.s 

- Antennae longer, reaching or passing base 
of prothorax 3 

3. Mcntuiii not loolhed; size larger, c. 5 mm 
(p. 77) Acp]iniditis 

- Mentuni toothed: smaller, less than 3 mm 
(p. 78) Caphoia 



ODONTOMASOREUS n. gen. 

Diagnosis. Rather small, convex Anau- 
lacini; immediately distinguished from other 
genera of tribe by humeri dentate. 

Description. Form nitiduloid (Fig. 33), 
convex; color piceous with pale elytral 
marks; reticulate microsculpture isodiamet- 
ric on head, slightly and irregularly trans- 
verse on pronotum and elytra. Head nor- 
mal, c. as in Aephnidius adelioides except 
labrum rounded; antennae short, reaching 
r. middle of prothorax, with median seg- 
ments wider than long; mentum blimtly 
toothed or obtusely prominent at middle. 
Prothora.x normal; anterior angles mod- 
erately advanced; base sinuate but scarcely 
lobed; disc with fine, abbreviated middle 
line. Elytra: humeri finely dentate; mar- 
gins weakh' sinuate near apex; striae in- 
dicated but scarcely impressed, scutellar 
striae not visible. Secondary .sexual char- 
acters: i tarsi slightly dilated, 3 segments 
2-seriately squamulose; i copulatory organs 
as in Figure 175. 

Ty))e .species. Odontomasoreus humcralis 
( below). 

Generic distribution. Known (^ily from 
New Guinea, thus far only from the east- 
ern and central parts of the island. 

Notes. I recognize only 1 species of this 
new genus, with 2 subspecies. 

Key to Subspecies of 
Odontomasoreus fii mfrai.is 

1 . Larger ( 3.4-4.0 mm ) ; humeri broadh pale 
(Papua) (p. 76) humcralis ,9.,9. 

- Smaller (3.1-3.5 mm); humeri dark or at 
most with \ague or small pale areas (N-E. 
N. G. and eastern \\'e.st N. G.) (p. 77) ^ 
subsp. rcdurliis 

Odonfomasoreus humeralis n. sp. 

Descri])lion. With cliaraclers o\ genus; 
form as in Figure 33; brownish piceous, 
humeri, base of elytra, and an elongate mark 
on 2n(l inter\al of each elytron near apex 
testaceous; mouth parts and ai)pendages 
brownish or testaceous. Jlcad 0.60 and 
0.63 width prothorax. ProlJiorax widest 
near base, narrowed anteriorh-; width/ 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 77 



length 1.81 and 1.81; base/apex 1.42 and 
1.39; sides weakly arcuate, very narrowly 
margined, each with usual 2 setae, at base 
and c. -i from apex; base finely margined, 
apical marginal line weak or interrupted 
at middle; disc vaguely impressed each 
side before base. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.10 and 1.10. Measurements: 
length 3.4-4.0; width 1.7-1.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 

31.393) and 21 paratypes all from Dobo- 
dura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. Most specimens of the type series 
were taken in flood water in rain forest 
after heavy rainfall. The insect evidently 
inhabits leaf litter and perhaps loose soil 
in rain forest. 

Odonfomasoreus humeralis reductus 
n. subsp. 

Description. Similar to typical humeralis 
but smaller, with the basal pale areas of 
elytra reduced or absent but subapical 
marks distinct. Head 0.62 and 0.62 width 
prothorax. Prothorax: width/length 1.80 
and 1.86; base/apex 1.45 and 1.41. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.08 and 1.08. Mea- 
surements: length 3.1-3.5; width 1.5-1.6 
mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 

31.394) and 6 paratypes from Hollandia, 
West N. G., July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 
Additional paratypes from N-E. N. G.: 1, 
Astrolabe Bay, 1898 ( Biro ) ; 5, Aitape, Aug. 
1944 (Darlington). 

Measured specimens. The $ holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Hollandia. 

Genus ANAULACUS Macieay 

Macleay 1825, Annulosa Javanica, p. 22. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1292 (see for additional references). 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 286. 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key to genera. 
Description. None required here. 
Type species. Anaulacus sericeipennis 
Macleay, of Java. 



Generic distribution. Tropical Asia to 
the Philippines and New Guinea; South 
Africa. 

Notes. One species (in fact, only 1 in- 
dividual) of this genus has been taken in 
New Guinea. 

Anaulacus siamensis Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1876, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 51, Part 2, 

p. 25. 
'hterhai Jedlicka 1934, Sbornik Ent. Odd. Nar. 

Mus. Prague 1934, p. 119. 
?kendengensis Louwerens 1952, Treubia 21, p. 215. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; fonn (Fig. 34) of 
Aephnidius but antennae relatively short; 
reddish piceous without well defined mark- 
ings. Head 0.66 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.74; base/apex 1.34. Elytra: 
width elytra/ prothorax 1.08. Measurements: 
length c. 4.5; width c. 1.9 mm. 

Type. From Siani; in Oberthiir Coll., 
Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. West N. G.: 
1, Geelvink Bay, 1878 (Raff ray & Maindron, 
Paris Mus.). 

Notes. This individual is identified from 
description and from notes, made at the 
British Museum in 1947-1948, on a speci- 
men from the Andaman Islands identified 
as siamensis by Andrewes. The unique 
type of sterbai, from Malinao, Tayabas, 
Philippine Is., is in the British Museum 
too; it does not differ significantly from 
the Andaman siamensis. I have a paratype 
of kendengensis from Java, and it too is 
very close to siamensis. All these names 
probably apply to one species that ranges 
from the southeastern corner of Asia to the 
Philippines and New Guinea, but the 
material seen is too limited to justify a 
final decision. 

Genus AEPHNIDIUS Macleay 

Macleay 1825, Annulosa Javanica, p. 23. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1288 (see for additional references and list 

of species). 
Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carabiques de la Region 

Malgache, Part 3, p. 861. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 284. 



78 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Diag,mms. See preceding Key to genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. AepJmidiiis adelioides Mac- 
leay (below). 

Generic distribution. All principal trop- 
ical and some adjacent warm-temperate 
areas of world. 

Notes. A single widely distributed species 
of the genus occurs in New Guinea. 

Aephnidius adelioides Macleay 

Macleay 1<S25, Animlosa javaiiita, p. 23, pi. 1, 
fig. 7. 

Andrewes 1930, Cat. Indian Insects, Part IS, 
Caral)idae, p. 11. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1288 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description. None required here; length 
± 6 mm. 

Type. From Java; in British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Widely dis- 
tributed: 29 specimens from Papua (in- 
cluding Dobodura), N-E. IS. G., and West 
N. G., at low and moderate altitudes, up 
to 1200 m (at Wau). 

Notes. This species ranges from SE. 
Asia, Japan, and Formosa to northern 
Australia, east to the Philippines, New 
Britain, and New Ireland. Seven speci- 
mens from Wau and 1 from near Hollandia 
are labeled as taken in light traps. 

Genus CAPHORA Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-CJoebel 1846, l''aiinula (Coleop. Hiiiiuiniac, 

p. 91. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1293 (see lor additional relerences). 
Jedlicka 1963, Knt, Abliandlnni^'en 28, p. 288. 

Diapiosis. Very small Anaulacini ( under 
3 mm); characterized in the preceding Key 
to (kniera of the tribe. 

Description. None refjuired lu^e. 

Type species. Capltora liuniilis Scliuiidl- 
Goebel ( below ) . 

Generic distrihntion. SE. Asia, Sumatra, 
Java, the Philippin<>s, New (>iiinea, and 
Cajie York. Australia (see following 
species ). 



Caphora humilis Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Fannula Coleop. Birnianiae, 

p. 91, pi. 3, fig. 8a-b. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1293 (see for additional references). 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlnngen 28, p. 289. 

Description. None required here. The 
very small size distinguishes this species 
from all other members of the tribe found 
in the region in question. Length c. 2.5 mm. 

Type. From Burma; should be in Prague 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Brown River, May 24, 1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., 
Bishop Mus.), in light trap. 

Notes. This species is recorded from 
India and Burma to Sumatra and Java 
and occurs also on the tip of Cape York, 
Australia (collected by me in 1958). My 
Cape York specimens were found in the 
Lockerbie rain forest, in leaf litter mixed 
with bird droppings under a large tree in 
which colonial birds had nested. Tlie 
beetles were in company with Peri<i.ona 
niiiriceps, which is often carried by com- 
merce, and this suggests that CapJiora too 
may sometimes be carried by man. 

Tribe CYCLOSOMINI 

This is another small tribe, repr(\sented 
in all the warmer rt>gions of the world. 
The name to use for it is doubtful but not 
worth detailed discussion here. The mem- 
bers of the tribe, although apparently re- 
lated to Anaulacini, are superficialh' Lel)ia- 
like but diffcT from Lebia iu having very 
long tibial spurs. The only genus of the 
tribe that occurs iu New Guinea is 
Sarotlirocrepis. 

Genus SAROTHROCREPIS Chaudoir 

Chandoir 1876, linll. Soc. Nat. Mo.scow 51, Tart 2. 
p. 76. 

(>siki 1932, Coleop. ('at., ("arabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1302 (see lor s\n()n\Mn\', additional refer- 
ences, and list of species ) . 

Jedlicka 1963, Knt. Abliandlunuen 2S. p. 290. 

Diaii,)}osis. Sec undc^r tribe. 
Dcscri))ti()n. None reciuired lieic. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



79 



Type species. Carahus corticalis Fab- 
riciiis, of Australia. 

Generic distribution. Represented in 
Australia by numerous, diverse species; 1 
species group extends to New Guinea, 
some Lesser Sunda Islands, Celebes, and 
the Philippines. 

Notes. Although most other genera of 
this tribe are (I think) ground-living, 
Sorotlirocrepis is arboreal. Many Australian 
species live on the trunks of Eucalyptus 
trees, but a few live in foliage, as does the 
single New Guinean species. The tarsal 
claws tend to vary with habitat. In the 
foliage-living New Guinean species and also 
its immediate Australian relatives, each 
claw has several long teeth. In some Aus- 
tralian tree-trunk-living forms, the claw 
teeth are shorter or irregular. 

Sarothrocrepis papua n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 35; ir- 
regular bro\\'nish yello^^', elytra with vari- 
able post-median dark brown mark usually 
irregularly triangular or M -shaped; reticu- 
late microsculpture isodiametric on front, 
scarcely or slightly transverse on pronotum, 
more transverse on elytra. Head 0.67 and 
0.67 width prothorax. Frothorax: width 
length 1.45 and 1.50; h-Ase head 1.41 and 
1.41 (apex of prothorax too rounded for 
exact measurement ) ; margins moderate an- 
teriorly, much wider posteriorly ( as usual in 
genus), each with seta at basal angle and 
another c. ''.•! from apex; base finely mar- 
gined, apical marginal line interrupted at 
middle; median line lightly impressed, sub- 
apical transverse impression weak, subbasal 
transverse impression and posterior-lateral 
impressions slight. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.52 and 1.48; striae deeply im- 
pressed, not punctate; a seta-bearing punc- 
ture at base each 2nd interval, usually an 
inconspicuous puncture on inner edge each 
3rd interval near apex, and sometimes an 
apparent minute puncture on outer edge 
3rd interval c. V-i from base. Inner u'inii,s 
full. Lower swface and legs: no note- 
worthy characters except tarsal claws each 



with 4 long teeth, the inner one smaller and 
sometimes difficult to see. Secondary sexual 
characters: i front tarsi slightly dilated, 3 
segments 2-seriately squamulose (4th seg- 
ments with soles of non-sexual adhesive 
hairs in both sexes); S (not 9 ) apical 
ventral segment deeply acutely notched at 
middle; 1 seta each side apex last ventral 
segment in both sexes. Measurements: 
length 4.6-6.4 (usually 5.0-5.5); width 2.3- 
3.0 (usually c. 2.7) mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,395) and 120 paratypes all from Dobo- 
dura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 

Additional material. Thirteen specimens 
from other localities in Papua, N-E. N. G., 
and West N. G.; and 2 specimens from 
Cape Gloucester, New Britain, Jan.-Feb. 
1944 (Darlington). 

Measured .specimens. The holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. Sarothrocrepis papua resembles S. 
fasciota Macleay of North Queensland, Aus- 
tralia, but is larger, with prothorax narrower 
and elytral markings slightly different. 
Three similar species occur in the Malay 
Archipelago. S. m-miorum Jordan, from 
Tenimber (and in Andrewes Coll. also 
from Sumbawa, Sumba, and Andonare Is. ) , 
has prothoracic margins narrower than 
papua and the dark M-mark usually better 
defined (but the mark is variable in papua). 
S. javanica Van Emden has prothoracic 
margins narrower and basal impressions of 
pronotum more linear. And S. andrewesi 
Jedlicka, of the Philippines, has the elytral 
marks different (3 dark stripes on yellow 
background) and basal impressions of 
pronotum better defined, sublinear. These 
names may all be based on forms of one 
widely distributed variable species, but I 
prefer to treat them as separate species 
for the time being. 

S. papua was very common in under-story 
foliage of rain forest at Dobodura, espe- 
cially in clumps of dead leaves still attached 
to low branches. It is probably mainly 
diurnal, although I have seen 2 specimens 
taken in light traps. 



80 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Tribe LEBIINI 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1305 ff. (see for synonymy and additional 
references ) . 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen (Dresden) 28, 
p. 295. 

Habu 1967, Fauna Japonica, Carabidae, Trun- 
catipennes Croup, p. 57. 

Lehiidae Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. 
Carabiques, Part 2, p. 1017. 

Teannel 1949, Coleop. Caraliiques de la Region 
Malgache, Part 3, p. 876. 

Lehiinae Basilewsky 1953, Exploration Pare Na- 
tional rUpemba, Fasc. 10, Carabidae, p. 184. 

Lebiini are medium sized and small 
Carabidae usually recognizable by general 
appearance. Tlie elytra are usually (but 
not always) obliquely truncate or sinuate- 
truncate at apex (and often spined too), 
and the insects have additional technical 
characters, including genitalic ones, given 
by authors cited above. 

The tribe is a very large one. It is best 
represented in the tropics and includes a 
large proportion of arboreal forms especially 
in the tropics. 

Arboreal Lebiini divide into two ecologic 
groups, one living on tree trunks and the 
other in foliage. The tree-trunk dwellers 
are numerous in rain forest and some occur 
on fallen trees and logs as well as the trunks 
and larger branches of living trees. Some 
are nocturnal, some diurnal. Some of them 
can be trapped under sacking tied around 
tree trunks or laid over logs. Lebiini living 
on tree trunks and logs in New Guinea 
include Stcnotchis, Mi.scclus, Mimtthodcs, 
C(it(isco))iis\ Pcricahis, Coptodcra (some), 
Moclifhcrus, and Strickhindia. (Other lebi- 
ine genera, especially PJidopldocus, A'^ono- 
cliila, and Australian Demetrida, live on the 
trunks of Eucalijpius trees in more open 
woodland in Australia. ) The foliage dwel- 
lers in New Guinean rain forest include 
Aristolehia, Lehia, Dolichoctis, Cclacncphcs, 
and especially New Guinean Demetrida. 
(The ecology of Demetrida is discussed in 
more detail in Note.s' imder the genus. ) 
Different foliage-inhabiting Lebiini in New 
(Uiinea probabK inhabit dilfcrent sj^jccial 



niches. Some species are commonly taken 
by sweeping under-story plants in rain 
forest but other species are not, and these 
may live at higher levels in the trees. They 
may be difficult to collect except when trees 
are felled, unless they fly to light. Be- 
sides the arboreal forms, a few Lebiini in 
New Guinea ( and relatively more in colder 
climates) live on the ground, especially in 
leaf litter in rain forest. In New Guinea, 
these include some Coptodcra, probably 
Sijntomus- and Microlestes and Apri.stus, and 
certainly Anomotarus and Nototonis. The\ 
can be collected in small numbers, labori- 
ously, by sifting or in Berlese traps, or in 
larger numbers and more easily by washing 
out debris and loose earth from the forest 
floor or by sorting and washing flood debris 
from rain forest. 

Most Lebiini are winged and many of 
them fly actively to escape danger or to 
disperse (see Notes under Catascojm.s), 
and some, presumably mostly nocturnal 
species, fly to light at night. The only 
known New Guinean lebiine with atrophied 
wings is Nototariis papua. 

Although Lebiini are most numerous and 
diverse in the tropics, the tribe as a whole 
is virtualK' cosmopolitan. A few genera, 
including Lehia and Coptodera, are very 
widely distributed too, but most other 
genera have restricted distributions. 

Thirty genera of Lebiini are known in 
New Guinea and at least 3 additional 
genera probably occur. Many of the genera 
are shared with, better represented in. and 
probably derived from the Oriental Region. 
These include Lehia, Catascopus, Coptodera. 
Dolichoetis, and more than a do/en smaller 
genera. Genera shared maiuK with and per- 
haps derived from Australia are fewer but 
include Aiionochda. TriiionotJiops, Phloeo- 
earahii.s, Aiioniofarus, Xototarus. and espe- 
cially Denielridu. The genera Miniithodes. 
Striekkindia, and Miseelus now center on 
New Guinea and may have originated there. 
The onl\- l(>biine genus actualK confined 
to New (Guinea is monotxpic Minitj)hJoeus. 

The uenus Demetrida seems to hv in the 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darluii'ton 



81 



very midst of an explosive evolutionary 
radiation, which is discussed under the 
genus. I know no other case quite like it 
among Carabidae. 

The following key to the genera of 
Lebiini of New Guinea is practical, not 
phylogenetic. Genera that occur together 
in the key are not necessarily closely re- 
lated, and the key is designed for onJy the 
New Guinean species of some genera. I 
haN'e used form of the whole insect as a key 
character of some genera. The form is 
characteristic in some cases, and the form 
of the whole is surely no less important 
than the form of a part. 

After the key, the genera are treated in 
the order of the Coleopterorum Ccitalogus 
(Csiki 1932), not in the order in which 
they are keyed out. 

An enormous supposed lebiine, Holopon- 
erus godeffroiji (Fairmaire), has been de- 
scribed from New Britain. I do not know 
this insect, but I think it is probably not 
a member of the Lebiini but of the tribe 
Helluodini, under which I shall discuss it in 
more detail. 

Key to Genera of Lebiini of New Guinea 

1. Fourth segments of hind tarsi deeply eniar- 
ginate, with lobes \-2 or more total length 

of segment 2 

- Fourth segments of hind tarsi more shal- 
lowly emarginate or subtnincate 10 

2. Form usually broad Lebia-\ike ( Figs. .37- 
41 ); base of prothorax ± lobed; upper sur- 
face not pubescent; tarsi not puljescent 
above; S middle tibiae excised on inner 
edge near apex 3 

- Form not LebiaAike, usually more slender; 
l)ase of prothorax often ( not always ) with- 
out lobe; tarsi often (not always) pubes- 
cent above; S middle tibiae usually not 
excised ( but tuberculate-serrate in many 
Demetrida ) „ 4 

3. Outer-apical angles of elytra sharply 
formed and prothorax ± hemispheric; S 
middle tibiae with 2 excisions on inner 
edge near apex ( p. 83 ) Ari.stolehia 

- Outer-apical angles of elytra either rounded 
or sharply formed, but if latter, prothorax 
not hemispheric (in New Guinean species); 
$ middle tibiae with 1 excision on inner 
edge near apex (p. 85) Lebia 



4. Small (4-4.5 nun); protliorax trapezoidal, 
widest at base (Fig. 87) (p. 134) 

Peliocypas 

- Larger; prothorax usually not as de- 
scribed 5 

5. Upper surface coarsely rugose and pubes- 
cent; prothorax strongly lobed at base; 
(form as in Fig. 42; length c. 8 mm) 

( p. 89 ) Lachnodenna 

- Upper surface not coarsely rugose; pubes- 
cent or not, ])ut if pubescent, prothorax 
not lobed at base 6 

6. Fifth elytral intervals with coarse seta- 
bearing puncture near base; prothorax with 
( very short ) basal lobe ( form as in Fig. 
95; length c. 8-9 mm) (p. 139) ____ Anclmta 

- Fifth elytral intervals without coarse punc- 
ture near base; prothorax usually (not 
always) without basal lobe 7 

7. Form (Figs. 97-109) usually slender; apex 
of elytra sinuate-truncate or angulate or 
spined but not broadly and strongly 

rounded; tarsi pilose above (p. 140) 

Demetrida 

- Form usually less slender; apex of elytra 
broadly and strongly rounded or weakly 
sinuate-truncate with outer angles broadly 
rounded; tarsi above pilose or not 8 

8. Prothorax with (slight) basal lobe; tarsi 
not pilose above (p. 184) Trigonothops 

- Prothorax without basal lobe (but base 
slightly oblique near angles); tarsi usually 
pilose above (pilosity slight in some 
Parena) 9 

9. Upper surface not pubescent (p. 138) .. Paremi 

- Upper surface pubescent ( p. 140 ) 

Endtjnomena 

10. Form (Fig. 37) characteristic, broadly 
oval with outer elytral angles sharply 
formed; £ middle tibiae with 2 excisions 
on inner edge near apex; ( length c. 9.5— 
11.0 mm — smaller species of same genus 
key out in couplet 3) (p. 83) ..^^ Aristolebia 

- Form not as above; S middle tibiae usu- 
ally not 2-excised _-_ 11 

11. Form (Fig. 36) characteristic; small (c. 
4 mm or less); upper surface pubescent; 
prothorax with extra anterior-lateral setae; 
brown with single broad transverse dark 
band across elytra (p. 82) ._- (SomotiicJtus) 

- Not as above in one or more ways 12 

12. Very small (less than 4 mm); color black 

or (rarely) transversely fasciate 32 

- Larger or, if length less than 4 mm, with 
color pattern of longitudinal lines 13 

13. Form (Fig. 88) characteristic, slender, 
with rounded elytral apices; mentum with- 
out tooth and claws not toothed; (black; 
length c. 7 mm) (p. 135) Celaenephes 

- Not as above 14 



82 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



14. Claws simple, not toothed; size usually 
large; color often metallic _ - 15 

- Claws each with several teeth; size often 
(not always) smaller; color rarely metal- 
lic 17 

15. Form (Fig. 45) characteristic, slender, 
subcylindric, with long genae and small 
eyes, and with rounded-truncate elytral 
apices; often (not always) only 1 seta 
over eye; (length 9.5-14.5 mm) (p. 91) _. 
Miscelus 

- Form not as above; 2 setae over each 
eye 16 

16. Labrum long, notched at apex; size larger 
( 8-22 mm ) ; color metallic or rarely brown, 

without geometric marks (p. 101) 

Catascopus 

- Labrum shorter, not notched; smaller (7- 
8 mm in New Guinean species); elytra 
with geometric marks (p. 110) „.. Pericohis 

17. Mentum not toothed 18 

- Mentum toothed 19 

18. Third elytral intervals with 2-4 dorsal 
punctures, lint if 2, not as described be- 
low; i middle tibiae usually excised on 
inner edge before apex (p. 110) .. Coptodera 

- Third elytral intervals with 2 minute non- 
seta-bearing punctures behind middle, or 
without recognizajjle dorsal punctures; $ 
middle tibiae not excised (p. 124) 

_ Dolichoctis 

19. Elytra spined 20 

- Elytra not spined 21 

20. Prothorax without extra lateral setae; form 
(Fig. 44) not .strikingly broad (p. 90) _ 
Stciiotcltis 

- Prothorax with many extra lateral setae; 
form (Fig. 86) strikingly broad (p. 132) .. 

Stricklatulia 

21. i""orm ( F'ig. 43) characteristic, broad, with 
broadly rounded elytral apices; (dull 
black; lengtli c. lO-ll mm) (p. 90) _.. 
Siniiriis 

- Not as above 22 

22. Elytral apices very strongly sinuate- 
truncate; (slender; color green, blue, or 
coppery; length in New Guinea c. 8-9 
mm ) ( p. 94 ) Holcodcrus 

- Not as above __ __ 23 

23. Form (Figs. 47-58) characteristic, very 
broad, with wide head but relatively small 
eyes, prothorax usually c. 2x wide as long, 
elytra short-cjuadrate; (pubescence and 
color diver.se; length c. 4-6.5 mm ) ( p. 
95) Miuutlwdes 

- Form not as above (if c. similar bul labrum 
notched, .see Minupldoeiis, below) 21 



24. Labrum notched at apex; pronotiun with 
numerous lateral setae; ( shining black; 
length 7.5-8.0 mm) (p. 117) ._.. Minuphloeti.s 

- Labrum not notched; pronotum with 2 lat- 
eral setae each side 25 

25. Third elytral intervals with 3 or 4 dorsal 
punctures or (in some Agonochila) these 
pimctures lost amid other coarse puncta- 
tion and short pubescence ^._ 26 

- Third elytral intervals with 2 or rarely 1 
dorsal punctures 27 

26. Surface conspicuously short-pubescent and 
(at least on elytra) roughened (p. 118) __ 
Agonochila 

- Surface not distinctly pubescent, not 
roughened; (3rd elytral intervals with 3 
pimctures) (p. 122) Oxijodontus 

27. Labial palpi slender 28 

- Labial palpi with apical segments ± 
widened, usually subtriangular 29 

28. Third elytral inter\als 2-punctate; pro- 
notum setulose (p. 122) Mochthcrtis 

- Third elytral intervals 1-punctate; pro- 
notmn not setidose ( p. 123 ) ^- (Mochtheroides) 

29. Antennae and tarsi relatively short and 
thick; i middle tiliiae arcuate and with 
shallow excision at middle of length; (color 

brown; length c. 8 mm) {p. 138) 

( Ploch ion us ) 

- Antennae and tarsi more slender; S middle 
tibiae not as described 30 

30. Eyes abruptly prominent, genae short and 
forming c. right angles with neck ( p. 
183 ) Pldococarahus 

- Eyes less prominent, genae longer and 
forming obtuse angles with neck 31 

31. Side pieces of metasternum long; inner 
wings full; color pattern usualh' present 
(p. 186) -- Anomotarits 

- Side pieces of metasternum scarcely longer 
tliau wide; inner wings vestigial; color r. 
uniform brownish black (p. LSo) Xototcini.s 

32. Claws simple, not tootlicd; ( incntuin with 
entire tooth) (p. 137) A;)n.s7(/.s 

- Claws each with se\ eral [ sometimes weak ) 
teeth .-.- 33 

33. Mentum with (emarginate) tooth {p. 
135) ___ _ _ Syntoimi.s 

- Nhntuin not toothed (p. 136) .... Microlc'stcs 



(Genus SOMOTRICHU5 Seidlitz) 

Seidlitz 1887, Fauna lialtica, 2nd cil,, Cattungcn. 

p. 7. 
Nhiteu 1963, Ann. Mus. C.W. Genoa 74, pp. 131 ff. 

(See also references under following species) 

Didi^iiosis. Form as in I'imire 36. .small. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



83 



subparallel, with eyes rather small and 
\\idely separated (in this tribe); upper 
surface pubescent; pronotum with several 
strong setae each side; wings full; 4th hind- 
tarsal segment weakly emarginate. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Carahus elevatiis Fabricius 
(below). 

Generic distribution. One species has 
been dispersed over the wanner parts of 
the world by man. A second species is 
known only from Madagascar. 

(Somotrichus elevatus (Fabricius)) 

Fabricius 1787, Mantissa Insectorum 1, p. 198 
( Carahus). 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1308 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Jeannel 1942, Faune de France 40, Coleop. 
Carabiques, Part 2, p. 1032. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; brown with broad, 
regular, darker brown fascia across middle 
of elytra; length c. 3.5-4.0 mm. 

Types. From tropical America; now in 
Hunter Coll. (Glasgow) and Fabricius 
Coll. (Kiel) (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Not recorded 
but may occur. 

Notes. Somotrichus elevatus is sup- 
posedly native in tropical Africa but has 
been carried over much of the world by 
commerce. It is often found in seaport 
cities. In the Malay Archipelago it has 
been collected on Java, Celebes, and 
Batjan ("Batchian") in the Moluccas, and 
I have a specimen before me from Peleliu 
in the Palau Is. Its occurrence in New 
Guinea is therefore likely. It has not yet 
been found in Australia. 

Genus ARISTOLEBIA Bates 

Bates 1892, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 32, p. 428. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1308 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlnngen 28, p. 311. 

Diagnosis. Similar to large Lehio with 
prothorax c. hemispheric and outer elytral 



angles sharply defined; wings full; 4th seg- 
ments middle and hind tarsi emarginate or 
lobed (see following Notes); claws with 
9-11 long teeth in larger species but only 
5-7 teeth in smaller species; c^ middle tibiae 
each with 2 (not 1 as in Lebia) excisions 
close together on inner edge near apex; most 
other characters including those of mouth- 
parts as in Lebia. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Aristolebia quadridentata 
Bates, of Bunua. 

Generic distribution. Southern India 
(specimens in M.C.Z.), southern China, 
Burma, etc., to the Philippines, New 
Guinea, and the tip of Cape York, Aus- 
tralia (see under A. wau, below). 

Notes. The smaller species described be- 
low are in some ways transitional between 
Aristolebia and Lebia, but Aristolebia seems 
to me to be a natural group worth distin- 
guishing from Lebia, which is an enormous, 
unwieldy genus. The tarsal lobes in 
Aristolebia vary, but the variation shows 
continuity. In large Asiatic species of the 
genus the 4th segments of the hind and 
middle tarsi are relatively weakly emar- 
ginate. In the large New Guinean species 
{papua) the lobes of the 4th segments are 
rather short on the hind but longer on the 
middle tarsi. And in the smaller New 
Guinean species the lobes of the 4th seg- 
ments are long, more than Vl' the segments' 
length even on the hind tarsi, and are rela- 
tively longer in capitis than in icau. 

In New Guinea, Aristolebia occurs chiefly 
at mid-altitudes. It is probably arboreal 
(in rain forest) and probably diurnal, al- 
though a few individuals have been taken 
in light traps at Wau. 

Key to Species of Aristolebia of New Guinea 

1. Larger, 9.5-11.0 mm (p. 84) papua 

- Smaller, 5.5-6.5 mm 2 

2. Entirely yellow or brownish yellow; sutural 
angles distinct and usually subdenticulate (p. 
84 ) tvau 

- Elytra dark with broad stripes or spots pale; 
sutural angles (narrowly) rounded (p. 85) .. 
capitis 



84 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Arisfolebia papua n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 37; black, sides of pro- 
notum broadly and of elytra narrowly pale, 
elytra with variable pale marks or some- 
times wholly dark, lower surface, mouth- 
parts, and appendages reddish brown; 
rather shining, microsculpture as described 
below. Head 0.76 and 0.73 width prothorax; 
front irregularly slightly impressed and 
rugulose anteriorly, rather sparsely punc- 
tulate, with c. isodiametric microreticulation 
especially posteriorly. Prothorox: width/ 
length 1.67 and 1.60; base/apex c. 1.95 
and 1.98 (figures approximate because an- 
terior angles not defined ) ; margins narrow 
anteriorly, broad posteriorly, each with seta- 
bearing puncture at basal angle and before 
middle; base and apex with entire impressed 
marginal lines; disc slightly transversely 
rugulose, sparsely punctulate, in part lightly 
microreticulate. Elytra ample; width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.70 and 1.67; outer-apical and 
sutural angles acute and denticulate; striae 
entire, impressed, faintly or not punctulate; 
intervals with slightly transverse microretic- 
ulation and sparse fine punctulation, 3rd 
with 2 dorsal punctures on outer edge c. % 
from base and less than Vi from apex 
(slightly variable in position). Leii,.s: 4th 
segments middle and hind tarsi as in Figure 
166; claws broadly triangular, each with c. 
10 long teeth. Secondary sexual characters: 
6 front tarsi scarcely dilated but with nar- 
row, irregularly 2-seriate squamules; i mid- 
dle tibiae 2-excised; i with 2, 9 c. 4 setae 
each side before apex last ventral segment. 
Measurements: length 9.5-11.0; width 4.5- 
5.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
17 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,396) from Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G., 1100 to 1300 m, dates in Jan.. Feb., 
Apr., May, Aug., and Sept., 1961-1963 
(Sedlaceks) (holotype, 1200-1300 m. May 
7, 1963); and additional paratypes as fol- 
lows. N-E. N. G.: 1, Swart Vy., Karubaka, 
1500 m, Nov. 11, 195S (Gressitt). West 



N. G.: 1, -'Humbolt Bay" (N. A. Doherty, 
British Mus.). 

Additional material. Papua: 1, W . Dis- 
trict, Oriomo Govt. Station, Oct. 26-28, 
1960 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Wau. 

Notes. This may prove to be a geographic 
form oi Arisfolebia davaonis (Heller) of the 
Philippines, but the color is different 
( davaonis has the prothorax rusty red, not 
black) and other details are probably dif- 
ferent, although I cannot be sure about 
them from Heller's description of his single 
specimen. A form of davaonis, or a related 
species, has been found also on Salajar Is. 
off Celebes (specimens received from 
Louwerens ) . 

The single individual from Papua is the 
only one in the New Guinean series with 
whollv dark elvtra, and it differs slightly 
from the type series in other ways. It may 
prove to be a distinguishable geographic 
form. Other variation in elytral pattern is 
individual in the series from Wau. 

Arisfolebia wau n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in preceding species {))apua): 
usually entirely reddish yellow, rarely with 
faint dusky areas especially at base of 
elytra; upper surface with light, irregular, 
c. isodiametric or slightK- transverse micro- 
reticulation. Head 0.80 and 0.77 width 
prothorax. Prothorax: width length 1.56 
and 1.67 (difference due parth to slight 
abnormal extension of basal lobe in the first 
individual); lateral margins wide, flattened 
or weakly reflexed especially posteriorly, 
each with usual 2 setae; base and apex 
with (>ntire marginal lines, but apical line 
weak at middle; disc irregularh' ± trans- 
versely rugulose. Elytra ample, convex; 
width elytra i)rothorax 1.72 and 1.76; outer- 
apical angles obtuse but well defined and 
sometimes subdenticulate, sutural angles 
slightK dehiscent, ± subdenticulate; striae 
entire, impressed, not distinctly punctulate; 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



85 



intervals convex, 3rd with 2 inconspicuous 
punctures on outer edge before middle and 
c. Vi from apex. Legs: 4th segments hind 
tarsi deeply emarginate but lobes shorter 
than usual in Lebia, 4th segments of middle 
tarsi with longer lobes; claws each with c. 
7 long teeth. Secondary sexual characters: 

i front tarsi with slender squamae probably 
in 2 series but often disarranged; S middle 
tibiae with 2 excisions close together on 
inner edge near apex; c^ with apparently 2, 

9 3 setae each side near apex last ventral 
segment. Measurements: length 5.5-6.5; 
width 2.7-3.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
22 paratvpes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,397) all from Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G., 1100-1500 m, dates in Jan., Feb., 
Mar., Apr., May, June, Sept., Nov., Dec, 
1961-1963 ( Sedlaceks ) . 

Measured specimens. The S holotype 
and 1 9 paratype. 

Notes. I took a single 9 of this species 
at Lockerbie, near the tip of Cape York, 
in January 1958, thus extending the known 
range of Aristolchia to Australia. 

Aristolebia capitis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
fonn and characters as in wau (above) 
except slightly wider; elytra dark with 
either large humeral and smaller subapical 
marks reddish yellow or very broad reddish 
yellow stripes running from humeri to apex. 
Head 0.72 and 0.72 width prothorax. Pro- 
thorax: width/length 1.64 and 1.59. Elytra: 
width elytra/pro thorax 1.60 and 1.69; outer- 
apical angles sharply defined but sutural 
angles narrowly rounded. Legs with 4th 
segments middle and hind tarsi strongly 
lobed (Fig. 167); claws each with 5 long 
teeth and sometimes a 6th (inner) tooth 
that is difficult to see. Measurements: 
length c. 6.0-6.5; width 3.1-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (A.M.N.H.) and 1 

9 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,398) 

both from Mar Village, west Vogelkop, 

West N. G., Nov.-Dec. 1944 (V. S. 

Mallory ) . 



Notes. The rounding of the sutural angles 
and the small number of claw-teeth of 
capitis are Le1)ia-\ike, but the form is that 
of an Aristolchia ( some Lehia approach 
this form too ) and the $ middle tibiae are 
decisively 2-excised. 

Genus LEBIA Latreille 

Latreille 1802, Hist. Nat. Crustaceorum et In- 

sectorum 3, p. 85. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1310 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

subgenera, and list of species). 
Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part 2, p. 1028. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 314. 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea. 

Description (characters of New Guinean 
species only). Form broad but variable 
(Figs. 38-41); coloration variable, upper 
surface not pubescent. Head: eyes promi- 
nent, genae short; 2 setae over each eye; 
clypeus transverse, truncate or broadly 
slightly emarginate, with 1 seta-bearing 
puncture each side; labrum ± transverse, 
sometimes slightly rounded anteriorly, 6- 
setose; mentum strongly toothed; ligula 
rather broad, 2-setose; paraglossae attached 
to ligula, broad, setose. Prothorax ± lobed 
at base, anterior angles broadly rounded 
(so base/apex ratio not determinable); 
lateral margins broad posteriorly, ± reflexed, 
each with 2 setae, at or near basal angle and 
before middle; disc with usual impressed 
middle line, weak (or obsolete) anterior 
and deeper posterior transverse impressions, 
and weak transverse strigulation. Elytra 
wide but variable in form; striae entire; 3rd 
interval 2-punctate on outer edge. Inner 
wings full. Lower surface with some short, 
often inconspicuous pubescence. Legs: 4th 
segments middle and hind tarsi very deeply 
emarginate, with long lobes; 5th segments 
with accessory setae; claws with 4-6 long 
teeth. Secondary sexual characters: S an- 
terior tarsi not or scarcely dilated, with 
slender squamae in 2 series, often disar- 
ranged; S middle tibiae with 1 small deep 



86 



BiiUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



excision on inner edge just before apex; $ 
with apparently 1 or 2 (rarely 3), 9 2 or 
more seta-bearing punctures each side near 
apex last ventral segment (but these punc- 
tures often difficult to identify amid other 
punctures and pubescence ) . 

Type species. Carahus haemorrhoidaJis 
Fabricius {— Lehia maiiiinato (Fourcroy)), 
of Europe. 

Generic distribtition. Nearly world-wide 
except absent in some cold regions and on 
some remote islands. Species are numerous 
in most tropical regions but are relatively 
few (7) in New Guinea and still fewer in 
Australia. Tliis suggests that the genus 
has entered the Australian Region recently, 
from the direction of tropical Asia. 

Notes. The New Guinean representatives 
of this huge, widely distributed genus are 
probably all arboreal. Some or all of them 
live in the lower foliage of rain forest. They 
are probably diurnal, being rarely taken 
in light traps. 

Key to the Species of Lebia of New Guinea 

1. Outer-apical angles of elytra well defined ._^_ 2 

- Outer-apical angles of elytra rounded 3 

2. Color piceous; form of Endynoiucna (Fig. 
3cS) (p. 86) ciulynoiuena 

- Color yellow; form more of typical Lcbia 
(Fig. 39) (p. 86) externa 

3. Elytra with conspicuous black "anchor" 
mark on testaceous background, or dark with 
anterior lunules and apex testaceous (p. 
87 ) ____ karenia 

- Elytra differently marked or not marked 4 

4. Elytra dark with large conunon cordate 
area testaceous (p. 87) cordifcr 

- Not tlius marked . 5 

5. Brown, elytra sometimes vaguely darker or 
with vague discal cloud hut not sharply 
bicolored, and head and pronotum not or 
only lightly microrelieulate (p. 88) i>(i])iicUii 

- Eillier hicolored or with head and pronotum 
heavily microreticulate 6 

6. Not sharply hicolored, brown, elytra often 
with disc darker; head and pronotum heavily 
microreticulate (p. 88) harda 

- Bicolored, head and prothorax red-testace- 
ous, elytra entirely black or piceous; liead 
and pronotimi not or lightly microreticulate 
(p. 89) _ iii.siihinni) 



Lebio endynomena n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 38) more of Endynomena than 
of typical Lebia; piceous, reflexed margins 
of prothorax and ( narrowly ) of elytra trans- 
lucent testaceous, appendages reddish tes- 
taceous; shining, reticulate microsculpture 
absent or faint on front and pronotal disc, 
distinct and strongly transverse on elytra. 
Head 0.82 width prothorax; front weakly 
impressed at middle and on each side an- 
teriorly, irregularly rather sparsely punc- 
tate. Prothorax subcordate; width/length 
1.69; base apex not determinable; base and 
apex margined. Elytra c. % wider than pro- 
thorax, narrowed anteriorly; width elytra 
prothorax 1.72; apices slightly obliquely 
sinuate-truncate with outer angles well de- 
fined and almost subdenticulate and sutural 
angles irregularly narrowly rounded; striae 
impressed, not distinctly punctulate. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters as for genus, in- 
cluding (^ middle tibiae with 1 deep 
excision on inner edge just before apex; $ 
with 2 or 3 seta-bearing punctures before 
apex each side last ventral segment (punc- 
tures unsymmetric in the single specimen); 
9 unkno\\n. Measurements: length c. 7.7; 
width c. 3.9 mm. 

Type. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) from 
Bubia, Markham Vy., N-E. N. G., 50 m, 
Sept. 19, 1955 (Gressitt); the type is 
unique. 

Notes. This species differs in form and 
appearance from any other Lchia kno\\n 
to me, but the generic characters, including 
the excision of the i middle tibiae, are 
clearly those of Lebia. 

Lebia externa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 39; reddish yelkn\', ap- 
pendages slightl)' paler; rather shining, 
reticulate microsculpture absent or faint 
on Iront and pronotal disc, distinct and 
transverse on ebtra. Head 0.92 and 0.92 
width prothorax; Iront wt'akK impressed at 
middle and on each side antcriorlx , slighth' 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



87 



irregularly punctate. ProtJwrax rather small, 
not hemispheric but transversely subquad- 
rate with anterior angles broadly rounded; 
width/length 1.51 and 1.52; base margined, 
apex not margined at middle; disc rather 
strongly transversely strigulose and vaguely 
punctulate. Elytra almost 2x wide as pro- 
thorax; width elytra/pro thorax 1.98 and — ; 
rather strongly narrowed anteriorly; apices 
obliquely truncate-emarginate with outer 
angles obtuse but distinct and sutural angles 
narrowly rounded; striae impressed, not 
punctulate. Secondary sexual characters: 
S front tarsi with squamae ( if present ) not 
easily distinguishable (worn off?); S mid- 
dle tibiae with 1 deep excision on inner 
edge just before apex; c^ with 2, 9 4 setae 
each side near apex last ventral segment. 
Measurements: length 7.0-7.3; width c. 
3.2-3.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Pinciiu, Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., Apr. 20, 
1963 (Sedlacek); 1 $ paratype (M.C.Z., 
Type No. 31,399) from Wau, Morobe Dist., 
Mt. Missim, 880-1050 m, Feb. 8-9, 1963 
(Sedlacek); 1 9 paratype, Popondetta, 
Papua, 60 m, Sept. 3-4, 1963 (Sedlacek). 

Notes. Except for the distinct outer- 
apical elytral angles, this species resembles 
large individuals of Lebia papiicUa, de- 
scribed below. 

Lebia karenia Bates 

Bates 1892, Ann. Mns. Civ. Genoa 32, p. 426. 
Andrewes 1933, Ent. Series Indian Forest Records 
18, Part 5, pi. 3, fig. 9. 

Description (of New Guinean individ- 
uals). With characters of genus; form c. 
of typical Lebia; head, prothorax, and lower 
surface usually reddish testaceous (head 
and prothorax sometimes infuscate), elytra 
varying from dark with posthumeral lunules 
and apices testaceous (as figin-ed by An- 
drewes) to testaceous with broad sutural 
anchor mark; appendages reddish or tes- 
taceous; microreticulation light and irregu- 
lar on front, isodiametric or slightly trans- 
verse on pronotum, more transverse on 
elytra. Head 0.83 and 0.79 width prothorax. 



Prothorax not hemispheric but transverse- 
subquadrate with anterior angles broadly 
rounded; width/length 1.54 and 1.61; base 
margined, apex with marginal line weak or 
interrupted at middle. Elytra less than 2x 
width prothorax, narrowed anteriorly; width 
elytra/prothorax 1.83 and 1.84; apices 
obliquely sinuate-truncate with outer and 
sutural angles narrowly rounded; striae 
deep, impunctate. Measurements: length 
6.0-7.5; width 2.8-3.8 mm. 

Types. From Burma, in Genoa Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in Neio Guinea. Probably 
throughout New Guinea at low altitudes 
and in the lower mountains up to 1200 m 
(at Guega W. of Swart Valley); 20 speci- 
mens seen, from all 3 political divisions of 
the island. 

Measured specimens. A i from Dobodura, 
Papua, and 9 from TorriceHi Mts., N-E. 
N. G. 

Notes. My identification of this species 
is based on comparison with Andrewes' 
material at the British Museum. 

Lebia cordifer n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
(but 5th segments missing from all tarsi); 
form (Fig. 40) of typical rather narrow 
Lebia, piceous above with clypeus and 
labrum, side margins of prothorax, narrow 
reflexed margins of elytra, and large com- 
mon heart-shaped area on elytra (extend- 
ing from inside humeri to apical Vi at 2nd 
intervals and reaching 6th intervals lat- 
erally) testaceous; lower surface and ap- 
pendages brownish to testaceous; shining, 
reticulate microsculpture absent or faint 
on front and on disc of pronotum (but 
these areas sparsely punctulate), trans- 
verse on elytra. Head 0.89 width prothorax; 
eyes large and very prominent; front with 
V-shaped impression at middle and im- 
pressed each side anteriorly. Prothorax 
relatively small, not hemispheric; width/ 
length 1.58; sides strongly rounded, then 
strongly sinuate just before c. acute but 
blunted posterior angles; base with broad, 



88 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



strong, truncate lobe, weakly margined; 
apex subtruncate, not margined at middle. 
Elytra rather narrow but almost 2x width 
of ( small ) prothorax, slightly narrowed 
anteriorly; width elytra prothorax 1.95; 
apices obliquely sinuate-truncate, with 
outer angles broadly and sutural angles 
narrowly rounded; striae impressed, not 
distinctly punctulate. Secondary sexual char- 
acters of i as described for genus; i with 
2 setae each side before apex last ventral 
segment; 9 unknown. Measurements: length 
c. 5.7; width c. 2.7 mm. 

Type. Holotype $ (Leiden Mus.) from 
Bivak 39 A, Star Rge., West N. G., 1500 m, 
July 12, 1959 (Neth. New Guinea Exp.); 
the type is unique. 

Notes. This is distinguished from other 
New Guinean species in the preceding Key 
to Species, but I do not know its real rela- 
tionships. 

Lebia papuella n. sp. 

Description. Form of typical Lehia with 
relatively small prothorax; entirely brownish 
yellow, elytra sometimes with faint darker 
cloud; shining, reticulate microsculpture c. 
absent on front and on disc of pronotum, 
present on elytral intervals as transverse 
impressions not forming regular reticula- 
tions. Head 0.92 and 0.88 width prothorax; 
front scarcely impressed. Prothorax small, 
transversely subcjuadrate; width length 1.54 
and 1.56; basal and apical marginal lines 
faint or interrupted at middle; disc with 
anterior transverse impression subobsolete. 
Elytra much wider than prothorax, nar- 
rowed anteriorly; width elytra jMothorax 
1.92 and 1.91; apices oblicpiely slightK- 
sinuately truncate, with outer-apical angles 
broadly and sutural angles more narrowly 
rounded; striae impressed, not punctate. 
Secondary sexual characters as for genus; 
6 with apparently 2, $ 2 or more apical 
ventral setae each side. Measurements: 
length 4.1-5.5; width 2.0-2.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,400) and 25 paratypes all from Dobo- 
dura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 



Additional material. Thirtv, from nu- 
merous localities in all 3 political divisions 
of New Guinea, from lowlands to 1700 m 
(above Wau). Some of these specimens 
are assigned to this species doubtfully. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. Lebia papuella seems closely re- 
lated to a species from Queensland, Aus- 
tralia, that I identify as picipennis Macleay, 
but ])apuella has less pronotal microsculp- 
ture and less sinuate elytra! apices than 
picipennis. Similar (but not identical) un- 
determined species occur in the Philippines. 

Besides the type series, I have one ex- 
ceptionally large 9 from Dobodura that 
seems to be papuella. (Exceptional outsize 
individuals occur in some other, American, 
species of Lehia.) Its proportions and mea- 
surements are: head 0.87 width prothorax; 
prothoracic width/length 1.54; width ehtra 
prothorax 1.94; length 6.5; width 3.3 mm. 

My specimens (the types) were taken 
by sweeping and beating undergrowth and 
low foliage in rain forest. 

Lehia barda n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form of typical Lebia except prothorax 
tending toward hemispheric; yellow, elytra 
with ± distinct common dorsal plagia dark, 
the dark area sometimes extending almost 
to sides of elytra; lower surface and ap- 
pendages yellow; whole upper surface rel- 
atively dull, with deeply impressed iso- 
diametric microsculpture becoming slightK 
transverse on elytra. Head 0.81 and 0.81 
width prothorax; front with 2 small im- 
pressions anterior!). Prothorax: width 
Icngtli 1.60 and 1.70; base margined; apex 
not distinctly margined at middle. Elytra 
narrowed anteriorb'; width elytra prothorax 
1.80 and — ; apices weakly sinuate-truncate, 
witli outer and sutural angles rounded; 
striae deep, not distinctK' punctulate. Sec- 
ondary sext(al characters as for genus; S 
apparenth w itli 2, 9 3 setae each side last 
ventral segment. Mcd.surcnwnls: length 
4.4-5.8; width 2.2-2.8 mm. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



89 



Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,401) and 2 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 1, 
between Laloki R. and Brown R., 25 m. 
Mar. 16, 1956 (Gressitt); 1, Normanby Is., 
Wakainna, Sewa Bay, Nov. 21-30, 1956 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mns.). N-E. N. G.: 
1, Busu R., E. of Lae, 100 m, Sept. 13, 1955 
(Gressitt); 1, Wewak, 2-20 m, Oct. 11, 
1957 (Gressitt). West N. G.: 1, Hollandia, 
Apr. 1945 (Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 1, same 
locality, 100 m, Ang. 24, 1955 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This species may be related to the 
preceding ( papiiello ) but has the prothorax 
more hemispheric, a more distinct elytral 
cloud, and much heavier dorsal microsculp- 
ture. It is somewhat similar also to Lehia 
mehnota Chaudoir of Australia and Java 
(but not New Guinea! ) but is much smaller, 
with more hemispheric prothorax, and with 
the dark dorsal elytral mark less defined. 

Lebia insulorum n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 41) of typical Lehia with rather 
wide prothorax; bicolored, head and pro- 
thorax red, elytra piceous; lower surface 
red with sides of abdomen piceous; ap- 
pendages reddish testaceous; shining, re- 
ticulate microsculpture absent or faint on 
front and pronotum, distinct and moderately 
transverse on elytra. Head 0.80 and 0.79 
width prothorax; front with trace of large 
but indistinct (perhaps variable) V-shaped 
impression. Prothorax transverse, not hemi- 
spheric; width length 1.82 and 1.87; sides 
broadly rounded, slightly sinuate before 
slightly obtuse, blunted posterior angles; 
base margined, apex weakly or not mar- 
gined at middle. Ehjtra slightly narrowed 
anteriorly; width elytra/ prothorax 1.72 and 
1.70; apices obliquely weakly sinuate- 
truncate with outer angles broadly and 
sutural angles narrowly rounded; striae 
deep, not distinctly punctulate. Second- 
ary .sexual characters of S as described for 



genus; i with 2 setae before apex each 
side last ventral segment; 9 unknown. 
Measurements: length c. 7.5; width c. 3.4 
mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) from 
Nonnanby Is., Wakaiuna, Sewa Bay, 
Papua, Jan. 1-8, 1957 (Gressitt); and 1 i 
paratype (C.S.I.R.O., Ganberra, Australia) 
from Rossel Is., SE. Papua, Oct. 1963 (W. 
W. Brandt). 

Notes. Although this distinct species is 
placed in relation to others in the preceding 
Key to Species, I do not know its real rela- 
tionships. 

Genus LACHNODERMA Macleay 

Macleay 1873, Trans. Ent. Soc. New South Wales 

2, p. 321. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1347 ( see for additional references and list 

of species ) . 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 302. 

Diagnosis. Form (Fig. 42) diagnostic; 
and see preceding Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Lachnoderma cinctum 
Macleay, of Australia. 

Generic di.sfribution. SE. Asia including 
India and Japan, and across the islands 
to the Philippines, New Guinea, and 
Australia. 

Notes. I do not know how the different 
species of this genus are related to each 
other, and I do not know their habitats and 
habits. 

Lachnoderma foveolafum Sloane 

Sloane 1915, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
40, p. 472. 

Description. None required here: the 
only species of the genus in New Guinea; 
readily recognized by form (Fig. 42), color 
(see Notes below), very coarse sculpture, 
and pubescence; wings full; length (to apex 
of elytra) c. 8 mm. 

Type. From Gairns District, North 
Queensland, Australia; in Sloane Goll., 
Canberra (seen). 



90 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Occurrence in New Guineo. Only in 
Papua: 1, Yule Is. (Van Emden Coll., 
British Miis.); 1, Port Moresby, Sept. 24, 
1955 (Gressitt), in light trap; 1, Kiunga, 
Flv R., Aug. 1-3, 1957 (W. W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.); 2, Laloki, 1909, 1910 (F. 
Muir, H.S.P.A.); 2, Dogura, Oct. 20-Nov. 
19, 1955 (E. L. Cassidy, Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Goilala, Loloipa, Owen Stanley Rge., Jan. 
1-15, 1958 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. Sloane's (Australian) type had the 
prothorax red and elytra wholly blue-black. 
Some Papuan specimens are similar but 
others have the sides of the prothorax 
blackish and the suture more or less red. 
The variation is apparently individual. 

Genus SINURUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 12, p. 129. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 298, 
368 ( with key to the 3 known species ) . 

Dia^nosi.s. Form (Fig. 43) diagnostic; 
and see preceding Key to Genera of Lehiini 
of New Guinea. 

Description. None required here, but 
note labrum long, emarginate, 6-setose; 
mentum with short tooth; ligula very wide 
(or fused with paraglossae), 4-setose; 4th 
hind-tarsal segments small, simply emar- 
ginate; claws with c. 4 teeth; <:5 front tarsi 
with 3 segments each with 2 slender 
s(iuamae at apex; S 9 both with 1 seta 
each side last ventral segment. 

Generic dislrihnt ion. SE. Asia (Burma, 
etc.) across the islands to the Philippines 
and New (guinea. 

Type species. Si]uinis ojxiciis C^haudoir 
( below ) . 

Notes. "Sintirns?" ohsctiriis Sloane, from 
Sattelberg, N-E. N.G., is transferred to 
MochtJicrus (cj. v. ). 

Sinurus somewhat resembles but is ap- 
parently not related to Co])to^lossus of Aus- 
tralia. 

Sinurus opacus Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1869, Ann. .Soc. Ent. Iklgiuni 12, p. 130. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Al)handlungen 28, p. 368. 
Louwerens 1964, Ent. Tidskiift 85, p. 188. 



Description (selected characters only). 
With characters of genus; form as in Figure 
43; dull black; not setulose (except elytral 
margins very finely setulose) but entire 
upper surface heavily, finely, c. isodiamet- 
rically microreticulate. Head 0.75 and 0.72 
width prothorax. Protliorax variable in 
shape and proportions; width length 1.27 
and 1.43; base/apex 1.21 and 1.11; sides 
slightly (variably) angulate near middle. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.65 and 
1.59; striae entire, well impressed, with 
long, impressed scutellar striae. Measure- 
ments ( New Guinean specimens ) : length 
c. 10-11; width c. 4.4-5.2 mm. 

Type. From Borneo; in Oberthiir Coll., 
Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neio Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Popondetta, 25 m. May 1966 (Shanahan- 
Lippert, Bishop Mus.), in light trap. N-E. 
N. G.: 1, lower Busu R., Huon Pen., Mar. 
28, 1955 (E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.), in low- 
land rain forest. West N. G.: 1, Araucaria 
Camp, 800 m. Mar. 1939 (Toxopeus); 1, 
Mt. Gyifrie, sea level-1000 ft. (-c. 300 m). 
Apr. 1939 (Cheesman, S. Australian Mus. 
(sic)); 3, Waigeu Is.. Camp 1, Mt. Nok. 
2500 ft. (r. 760 m). May 1938 (Cheesman). 

Measured specimens. Two { i 9 ) from 
^^'aigeu. 

Notes. The known range of opacus is 
from Perak (Malay Pen.) and perhaps 
Burma to the Philippines and New 
(iuinea. The 7 New Guinean specimens 
\'ar\ in shape and proportions of prothorax. 
I cannot separate them satisfaetoriK- from 
1 from Perak and 4 from the Philippines 
that I have for comparison. 

The few .specimens of this species that 
1 ha\(> collect(xl (in the Philippines) were, 
1 think, among fermenting leaves on the 
ground in rain lorest. 

Genus STENOTELUS Bouchard 

Bouchard 1903, Ann. .Soc. Ent. France 72, p. 171. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. .Ahliandlnnuen 28, p. 371. 

Diuii^no.sis. See k'igure 44, and Key to 
Genera of Lehiini of \cu- Guinea. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



91 



Description. None required here, but 
note labrum rather narrow, subtruncate, 
not or at most faintly emarginate, 6-setose; 
ligula, 4th hind-tarsal segment, claws, and 
secondary sexual characters c. as described 
for Sinurus (above). 

Ty))e species. Stenotelus opactis Bouc- 
hard. 

Generic distribution. Malay Pen., 
Greater Siinda Islands, and Philippines 
(opaciis); Celebes (piceiis Louwerens 1952, 
Treubia 21, p. 217); and now New Guinea 
(new species described below). 

Notes. The species of this genus live on 
tree trunks in rain forest and are probably 
nocturnal. 

Stenotelus spinosus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 44; black, appendages 
dark; upper surface not pubescent, but 
elytral margins very finely short-setulose; 
rather shining, reticulate microsculpture c. 
isodiametric on front, somewhat transverse 
on disc of pronotum, more transverse on 
elytra; lower surface with sparse, irregular, 
short pubescence. Head 0.88 and 0.88 
width prothorax; front \\'eakly impressed 
each side anteriorly. Prothorax cordate 
with sides angulate before middle and 
strongly sinuate posteriorly (but sinuation 
less than in opacus); width length 1.44 and 
1.51; base/apex 1.07 and 1.07; apex mar- 
gined, base not distinctly so; side margins 
strongly reflexed, each with a seta at angu- 
lation and at (blunted) basal angle; disc 
with usual middle line and transverse im- 
pressions, and faintly transversely strigu- 
lose. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.67 
and 1.72; humeri rounded but prominent; 
outer-apical angles spined, sutural angles 
acutely toothed; striae entire, moderately 
impressed ( but scutellar striae faint ) ; 3rd 
intervals each with 2 conspicuous seta- 
bearing punctures on inner edge slightly 
behind middle and near apex. Inner winfi.s 
full. Lei!,s slender; 4th hind-tarsal segment 
long, slender, scarcely emarginate; 5th seg- 
ment with short, weak accessory setae; 



claws 4-toothcd, the innermost tooth small. 
Secondary sexual characters: S front tarsi 
scarcely dilated but with 3 segments 2- 
seriately squamulose (squamae often dis- 
arranged); 6 with 1, 9 2 setae each side 
near apex last ventral segment. Measure- 
ments: length 7.4-8.5; width 3.1-3.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,402) and 13 paratypes from lower Busu 
R., Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., May 4, 1955 
(E. O. Wilson), in lowland rain forest; and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 5, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
1, Kiunga, Fly R., Aug. 24-27, 1957 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus. ); 4, Normanby Is., 
Wakaiuna Bay, Dec. 1-10, 1956, and Jan. 
1-8, 1957 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 
West N. G.: 1, Mt. Nomo, S. of Mt. 
Bougainville, 700 ft. (c. 210 m), Feb. 1936 
(Cheesman); 2, Waigeu Is., Camp 1, Mt. 
Nok, 2500 ft. {c. 760 m), May 1938 (Chees- 
man ) . 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. S. spinosus is probably related to 
S. piceus Louwerens of Celebes (see under 
Generic distriI)ution, above) but piceus is 
described as pubescent, with outer-apical 
angles of elytra only strongly toothed, while 
spinosus is not pubescent and has these 
angles spined, although the length of the 
spines varies. 

The few specimens of this species that I 
collected were taken on trunks of standing 
and fallen trees in rain forest, mostly under 
burlap bands put out to trap nocturnal 
Carabidae. 

Genus MISCELUS Klug 

King 1834, Jalirbuchern Insectenkunde 1, p. 82. 
Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, 

p. 473. 
1923, Trans. Ent. Soc. London for 1923, 

p. 250. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 

7, p. 1359 (see for synonymy and additional 

references ) . 
Andrewes 1935, Fauna British India, Coleop., 

Carabidae 2, p. 3. 
Jeanne! 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Ca- 



92 Bulletin Museum of Coivpomtive Zoology, Vol. 137. No. 1 



rabiques, Part 2, p. 1017 (footnote: included 
in "Pericalidae"). 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Alihandhingen 28, p. 398. 

Diagnosis. Form (Fig. 45) characteristic 
(note form of eyes and genae, and of 
elytral apices); 1 or 2 setae over each eye 
(see Notes below); clypeus emarginate; 
labrum long, strong!)' rounded at apex, 6- 
setose, emarginate in some species but not 
in others; mentum toothed; ligula truncate, 
with usually 4 setae at apex, and additional 
setae in 2 irregular rows posteriorly; para- 
glossae longer than ligula, rounded, with- 
out setae; mesosternum wide between coxae; 
metasternum with longitudinal row of small 
tubercles each side of middle; wings full; 
4th hind-tarsal segments small, oval, weakly 
emarginate; 5th segments with weak ac- 
cessory setae; claws not toothed; 6 front 
tarsi scarcely dilated but each with 3 seg- 
ments 2-seriately squamulose below; c^ with 
small patch of dense pubescence on lower 
edge of front femur near base; i with 1, $ 
2 setae each side last ventral segment, the 
inner setae in 9 distant from margin. 

Descri])tion. None required here. 

Type species. Miscehis javanus King. 

Generic distribution. SE. Asia (includ- 
ing (leylon and India) to the Philippines, 
New (iuinea, and part of Cape York, 
Australia. 

Notes. The taxonomic position of this 
remarkable genus is doubtful, but will not 
be debated here. Sloane (1907) suggested 
a separate tribe for it, but one of the char- 
acters he stressed (the presence of only 
1 seta over each eye) is inconstant within 
the genus (see below), and Sloane later 
(1923) doubted it tribal separation was 
valid. Andrewes (1935) did give it tribal 
rank. 

The variation in number of setae over 
each eye in this genus is remarkable, it 
has been noticed before, but has not been 
ade(}uately described. Some ot the species, 
including the type of the genus (javanus 
Klug), have only 1 seta oxer each eye 
(Fig. 169), while'others have 2 (Fig. 16cS). 
Many species ol Carabidae belonging to 



genera that normally have 2 pairs of setae 
over the eyes are known to have lost the 
anterior pair, but the posterior setae then 
usually remain in their original position, 
between or slighth' behind the posterior 
corners of the eyes. But in the Miseelus 
with a single seta over each eye, the seta is 
between the positions of the 2 original ones, 
and appears to correspond to the single 
seta over each eye of the tribe Harpalini. 
The New Guinean Miseelus with 1 and with 
2 setae over each eye are apparenth' dif- 
ferent species, but they are so similar that 
some authors ( not noticing the setae ) have 
failed to separate them or have treated them 
as "varieties." Intermediates do not usually 
occur: each individual has either 2 setae 
over each eye or 1 seta in intermediate 
position. The only exception 1 have found 
is a 9 unicolor from Geelvink Bay (Paris 
Mus. ) with 1 seta each side in intermediate 
position and also, but only on the left side, 
an additional seta posteriorly. Most com- 
mon species of Miseelus have 1 seta over 
each eye, but forms with 2 occur in Ceylon 
and southeastern Asia as well as in New- 
Guinea. I plan to consider this case in 
more detail in Part I\' of the present work, 
in discussion of variation of taxonomic 
characters. 

The variation of the labrum, entire or 
emarginate in different members of this 
genus, is noteworthy too. 

The species of Miseelus that I ha\(' col- 
lected in New Guinea and the Philippines 
were on or under the bark of [vcv trunks or 
logs in rain barest. 

Key to Species ok Miscelus of Nkm- Guinea 

1 . Ehtral iiitorvals 3, 5, 7 carinati' at liaso; 
( 2 setae ()\ cr each eye; prothora.v more 
(juadrate; len.uth 14.5 mm ) (p. 93) lit(tuit\us 

- Ehtral interxals not carinale at l)a.se 2 

2. Two setae o\er eaeli eye; lalirnm with ape.\ 
emariiiiiate; onler-apieal el>tral angles more 
narrowly rounded (p. 93) .sihliit^ 

- One seta o\er eacli eye; lahruni iidt em;u- 
jiinate; outer-apical angles oi eKtri more 
l)roadl\' rounded - -^ 

3. Not spotted (p. 93) tDtirolor 

- Elytra with sul)apical sutural red spot (p. 
94 ) ( jdvatui.s) 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 93 



Miscelus luctuosus Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 725. 
Andrewes 19.35, Fauna British India, Coleop., 
Carabidae 2, p. 3, footnote. 

Description. A large Miscelus with rela- 
tively .square prothorax and with elytral 
intervals 3, 5, and 7 carinate at base; length 
14.5 mm; other distinguishing eharaeters in- 
cluding number of supraocular setae and 
emargination of labrum not noted by 
Putzeys, but Andrewes specifies 2 setae 
over each eye in this species. 

Type. From Andai, Papua, New Guinea 
(Beccari and D'Albertis, Genoa Mus.) (not 
seen ) . 

Occurrence in Netc Guinea. Apparently 
known only from the type. 

Notes. I have seen no Miscelus with 
carinate elytral intervals from New Guinea, 
although carinate forms do occur elsewhere. 
I think the species is probably distinct. 
It should be easily recognizable. 

Miscelus sibling n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 45) as usual; black, not spotted. 
Head 0.83 and 0.78 width prothorax; 2 
setae over each eye; labrum emarginate at 
apex. Prothorax subcordate; width/length 
1.24 and 1.22; base/apex 0.94 and 0.95; 
basal transverse impression very deep. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.33 and 
1.28; outer-apical angles narrowly rounded; 
intervals not carinate at base. Win'^s full. 
Secondary sexual characters as for genus. 
Measurements: length 12.0-14.5; width c. 
4.1^.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype S ( Bishop Mus. ) and 
4 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,403) 
from Wan, Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1100- 
1200 m, dates in Sept., Oct., 1961, 1962 
(holotype, 1100 m, Oct. 13, 1961) (Sedla- 
ceks); and additional paratypes as follows. 
Papua: 2 ( $ $ ), Dobodura, Mar.-July 
1944 (Darlington); 3, Goilala, Loloipa, 
Owen Stanlev Rge., (1 specimen 975 m), 
Nov. 16-25, ' 1957 and Jan. 16-30, 1958 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 



2, Sattelberg, Huon Gulf, 1899 (Biro); 1, 
same locality (British Mus.); 1, Karimui, 
1080 m, July 14-15, 1963, (Sedlacek); 1, 
Okapa, Aug. 6, 1965 ( Hornabrook ) . West 
N. G.: 1, Tami, May 11, 1903 (Paris Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This and the following species 
(unicolor) are sympatric, occurring at sev- 
eral of the same localities, and both occur 
also in New Britain. 

Miscelus unicolor Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 725. 
?stijgicus Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, 

p. 726. 
Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, 

p. 474. 
?morioformis Macleay 1876, Proc. Linnean Soc. 

New South Wales 1, p. 168. 
Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, 

p. 474. 

Description. None required here. This 
insect, whatever its proper name (see dis- 
cussion below), is the common, smaller, 
unspotted Miscelus of New Guinea, with 
1 seta over each eye; labrum not emar- 
ginate; outer-apical angles of elytra broadly 
rounded; length (in New Guinea) 9.5-13.0 
mm. 

Types. Of unicolor, from Java, should 
be in Brussels Mus.; of stygicus, from 
Andai, Papua, now in Genoa Mus.; of 
morioformis, from Hall Sound, Papua, pre- 
sumably in Macleay Mus., Sydney (none 
seen ) . 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Common 
and widely distributed: 69 specimens, 
from numerous localities in all three polit- 
ical divisions of New Guinea; most at low 
altitudes, but reaching 1200 m at Wan. 

Notes. The application of the name 
unicolor to this species in New Guinea is 
conventional. Without revising the whole 
genus, which I cannot do, I cannot decide 
the relationships of the New Guinean pop- 
ulation to populations farther west, nor 
can I decide the relationship of the un- 
spotted populations to spotted javanus. 

This species {"morioformis" ) is recorded 



94 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



from Coen, halh\'a\- up tlie Cape York- 
peninsula, Australia, by Sloane (1907). 

(M/sce/us javanus Klug) 

King 1834, Jahrbiichern Insectenkunde 1, p. S2, pi. 

1, fig. 9. 
Csiki 19.32, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1359 (see for many additional references and 

conventional synonymy ) . 

Description. None required here. If the 
typical form of this species occurs in New 
Guinea, it is the only spotted Mi.scehis 
there. Length c. (S.. 5-1 1.0 mm. 

Types. From Java; now should be in 
Berlin U. Zool. Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. Doubtful: 
New Guinea has sometimes been included 
in the range of this species, but the synon- 
ymy is confused and old published records 
are doubtful, and I have seen no specimens 
from the island. 

Notes. The supposed unspotted form of 
javanus, unicolor Putzeys, which may or 
may not really be conspecific, does occur 
in New Ciuinea and is treated above. 

Genus HOLCODERUS Chaudoir 

(Jliaudoir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 12, p. 153. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caral)i(lae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1360 (see for additional references and list 

of species). 
Jcdlicka 1963, Knt. Ahliandlnngen 28, p. 396. 

Dia!J,iU)sis. Form (of New Guinean 
species) as in Figur(> 46 (but form diverse 
in species outside New Guinea); color 
metallic; pronotum with 1 or more strong 
setae at or near each anterior angle; elytral 
apices unarmed but very strongly sinuate- 
emargiiiat(>; length c. 8-9 mm. 

Description (selected additional char- 
acters only). Not pubescent above (sparsely 
so below). Uead: labruiu moderately long, 
subtiiiiicatc or slightly cmarginate, 6-setose; 
inculuiii toodicd; labium 4-set()se, para- 
glossac distinct, longer than labium, with- 
out setae. Prolhorax: pronotum with mid- 
dle line coarse. Elytra: 3rd intervals with 
3 or inoic punctures, anterior punctme on 
outer and middle and posterior |)uncturcs 



on inner edge of intervals. Inner ir//)g.s full. 
Legs: 4th hind-tarsal segments scarcely 
longer than wide, shallowly emarginate; 
5th segments with accessory setae; claws 
with c. 4 weak teeth grouped near middle. 
Secondary .sexual characters: i front tarsi 
with 3 segments 2-seriately squamulose 
(apical squamules of 3rd segment over- 
lapping but not attached to 4th segment); 
2 setae each side last ventral segment in 
both sexes. 

Type species. Holcodertis praemorsiis 
C>haudoir, of Ceylon. 

Generic distriJ)ution. SE. Asia (includ- 
ing (a'vIoii and India) and across the 
islands to the Philippines, New Guinea, 
and northern Australia. 

Notes. This genus is relatively diverse in 
the western part of the Malay Archipelago. 
A single species group extends eastward to 
New Guhiea and Australia ( see Notes under 
following species ) . 

Holcoderus elongatus (Saunders) 

Saunders 1863, Trans. Ent. Soc. London (3) 1, 

p. 466, pi. 18, fig. 5a-h (Catascoput;) . 
Wallace 1863, in Saunders paper cited above, p. 

460 ( Cata.sc(>))iis). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. C^at., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1360 (see for additional references). 
Andrewes 1946, I'roc. R. Ent. Soc. London (B) 15, 

p. 87. 

Description. None required here. See 
Figure 46, characters stated under genus, 
the following Notes, and Andrewes' (1946) 
detailed rcdescription. Length c. 8-9 mm. 

Type. From Dorey, West N. (i., col- 
lected by Wallace; typ(^ in berlin U. Zool. 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. ProbabK 
throughout New Guinea: 24 spcximcMis, 
from all 3 political divisions ol the island; 
most from low altitudes ( including Dobo- 
dura), but 2 from Wan, 1150. 1200 m, and 
1 from W'aigeu Is., 2500 ft. ( r. 760 m). 

Notes. The \ariabilit\- of this species (if 
it is all one species) is remarkable. The 
h)rm is relatively constant, hut toloi \aries 
from wholK- blue or green or copper\ to 
bicolored with blue or green elytra and 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 95 



bright copper or violet prothorax. The 
punctation of the pronotal disc varies: the 
disc is always closely punctate in part, but 
a variable area centered near or behind 
the middle is usually less punctate. And 
the lateral prothoracic setae vary in number 
and position : at least 1 strong seta is always 
present (unless broken off) at each pos- 
terior angle, at the angulation of the pro- 
thoracic margin near or just before the 
middle on each side, and at each anterior 
angle, but some individuals have additional 
lateral setae of different sizes between the 
anterior and median setae, and the occur- 
rence of these extra setae is sometimes 
strikingly unsymmetric. 

This variation makes exact definition of 
the species and comparison with other 
species difficult. I think, however, that all 
New Guinean specimens of the genus can 
be referred to elongatus, that the latter is 
probably confined to New Guinea and adja- 
cent small islands, and that closely related 
forms occur both in the western Malay 
Archipelago (e.g., gracilis Oberthi.ir) and 
in tropical northeastern Australia ( coerulei- 
pennis Sloane). 

I do not know the habits of Holcoderus 
but I suspect that elongatus may inhabit 
tree tops. Tliis would account for my 
failure to find the species' natural habitat. 
My single specimen from Dobodura was 
taken at light, but this seems to be ex- 
ceptional. No other specimens are labeled 
as from light traps, and the bright color 
suggests partly diurnal habits. However, 
Wallace (1863) says that elongatus flies at 
dusk. 

Genus MINUTHODES Andrewes 

Andrewes 1941, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (11) 7, 

p. 317. 
Phitia Chaudoir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 12, 

p. 155 (not Platia Hiibner 1820, et al) . 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1361. 
Andrewes 1939, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (11) 3, p. 

137. 

Diagnosis. Usually immediately recog- 



nizable by form (head very wide but eyes 
smaller than usual in tribe, prothorax usu- 
ally c. 2x wider than long, and elytra short 
and subquadrate), small size (4-6.5 mm), 
and other characters given in the Key to 
Genera of Lehiini. 

Description. Form as indicated above 
and in Figures 47-58; upper surface espe- 
cially of elytra often (not always) with 
short pubescence, and elytra often (not 
always) with color patterns of many pale 
lines or pale blotches. Head wide but with 
relatively small eyes; antennae rather short; 

2 setae over each eye; front slightly im- 
pressed each side anteriorly; clypeus sub- 
truncate, with 1 seta each side; labrum 
rather long, irregularly rounded or subtrun- 
cate anteriorly, 6-setose; mentum toothed; 
ligula with 2 principal setae and 1 or more 
much smaller setae; paraglossae attached to 
ligula, longer, broadly rounded, without 
setae. ProtJiorax very wide, scarcely lobed 
at base, very broadly emarginate anteriorly, 
wdth wide, depressed or slightly reflexed 
lateral margins; each margin with a seta at 
basal angle and at or before middle of 
length; disc with usual middle line, weak 
anterior transverse impression, deeper sub- 
basal transverse impression. Elytra very 
wide and short; humeri prominent but 
rounded; apices obliquely sinuate-truncate; 
striae entire; 3rd interval with 3 dorsal 
pvmctures at least in some species, but these 
punctures often difficult to distinguish 
amid other punctation and pubescence. 
Inner wings full. Lower suiiace not or not 
extensively pubescent. Legs rather slender; 
tarsi sparsely setose above; 4th hind-tarsal 
segment weakly emarginate; 5th segment 
with accessory setae; claws each with c. 

3 short, weak (vestigial?) teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 front tarsi slightly 
dilated, with numerous narrow squamae 
not arranged in 2 series; 2 setae each side 
near apex last ventral segment in both 
sexes; and see under ^L sexualis for special 
secondary sexual characters of this species. 

Type species. Platia lineella Chaudoir, 



96 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



fixed by Andrewes 1939, p. 137. Andrewes 
designated this species as the type of 
Platia Chaudoir, and it is therefore also 
the type of MinutJiodes, proposed as a new 
name for preoccupied Platia. 

Generic distrihuiion. Nine species on 
New Guinea and neighboring small is- 
lands, fewer on the Moluccas, Celebes, 
New Britain, and northern Australia; 
none known elsewhere. 

Notes. This is a very distinct genus, con- 
fined to a limited geographic area ( above ) . 
The insects live wholly or chiefly on tree 
trunks and fallen logs in rain forest. Al- 
though they are winged, they do not often 
fly to light, which suggests that they are 
mainly diurnal. 

The striking secondary sexual characters 
of the 9 of se.xuali.s ( and of the related 
hraclnjdera Chaudoir of the Moluccas) are 
unique, so far as I know. 

The Greek ending -odes does not indi- 
cate gender, and Andrewes did not specify 
gender when he proposed Minuthodes to 
replace Platia. I therefore tentatively treat 
the name as feminine, to make the gender 
consistent with Platia. 

Key k) Si'KciEs of Mi.wrnonKS ok New Guinea 

1. Ehtra luarki'd witli iiuiiicrous loiiyitiuliiial 
pak' liut's, soiiK'tiiiK s iiiucli intcrniptcd 2 

- Elytra differently marked or not marked 5 

2. Median-lateral protlioraeie setae before mid- 
dle, c. '/•; of iirotlioraeic length from apex 
(p. 96) . p(i))uaii(i 

- Median-lateral setae near nn'ddle of pro- 
thoraeie length 3 

3. Elytra dnll; (length c. 6.5 mm) (p. 97) 
rossi 

- Elytra shining (under pubeseenee) 4 

4. Smaller (c. 4.8 mm) (p. 97) _._- scdlucikoiuni 

- Larger (c. 6.2 mm) (p. 97) .suhnitcn.s 

5. Metallie bine blaek (p. 9,S ) tiwlallica 

- Not metallie, black with or witlioni reddish 
yellow spots 6 

6. Elytra not plainly pubescent ( pubesci'iiee 
actually present but very short, scarcely 
\isil)le); 9 last \entral segment usually 
with s(iuare <'.\cision at apex, and 9 hind 
femur with flange or tooth near apex an- 
teriorl> ; (shiin'ng black, unspottixl or 2- 
or 4-spotted, Iml il spotted at least 1 pair 
of s]iols elongate) scxualis 



6a. Elytra not spotted, or each with a 
single pale dash behind middle (Fig. 
•55) (Papua) (p. 98) scxiudls s. s. 

6b. Ehtra either each with a single based 
dash, or 4-spotted with posterior spots 
elongate ( Figs. .56, A ) ( central and 

western New Guinea) (p. 99) 

_- subsp. signata 

- Elytra plainl\- pubescent; 9 not as de- 
scribed 7 

7. lilaek, not spotted; (Goodenough Is.) (p. 
99 ) si\n])h'x 

- Each eh'tron with 2 rather large red spots; 
(mainland of New Guinea) 8 

8. Smaller (4.0-5.3 nnn); elytral spots c. 
regular in outline (Fig. 57) (p. 100) __ rcgularis 

- Larger ( 5.5-5.8 mm ) ; elytral .spots irregu- 
lar in outline (Fig. .58) (p. 100) __ irregularis 

Minuthodes papuana (Sloane) 

Sloane 1917, Proc. Linnean Soe. New South W'ales 

42, p. 4,33 (Platia). 
Agonochda lineella Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. 

Zeitsehrift for 1907, p. 182 (not Platia lineella 

Ghaudoir 1869). 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 48; black or brownish 
black, appendages irregularly brown, elytra 
with complex, \ariable pattern of pale lines 
(Figs. 48, A); head and pronotum mod- 
erately shining although closely punctate, 
elytra roughened and duller, and upper sur- 
face especialh' ehtra with short but distinct 
pubescence. Head 0.78, 0.79, 0.81, and 0.80 
width prothorax. Prothorax: width length 
2.00, 2.04, 2.00, and 1.96; base apex 1.04. 
1.06, 1.05, and 1.04; median-lateral setae c. 
':i prothoracic length before apex. Eh/tra: 
width elytra jirothorax 1.46, 1.47, 1.45, and 
1.44; outer-apical angles moderateh and 
sutinal angles more narrowh' rounded. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters as lor genus; 9 last 
ventral segment and hind lemora not modi- 
fied, ^leasnrenients: li'iigth 4.4-5.2; width 
2.2-2.6 mm. 

Ty))e. From lierbcrlshohe, "New Pom- 
crania" ( = New Britain); should be in 
Deutsches Ent. Institut, Berlin (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. Common 
and widely distributed al low altitudes 
throughout New (Guinea, and octnrring 
also on Nornianb\ , (ioodenousj;!!. ;in(l Hos- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 97 



sel Is.: 142 specimens seen in all; reaches 
at least 1200 m at Wau. 

Measured specimens. A S 9 from Dobo- 
dura and c^ $ from Normanby Is., figures 
listed in this order. 

Notes. This species occurs on New 
Britain as well as New Guinea, and it 
apparently represents a group of species 
(or subspecies?) that includes JinceUa 
( Chaudoir ) of the Moluccas ( I have a 
series from Morotai Is.) and qucenslandica 
( Sloane ) of North Queensland, Australia ( I 
have specimens from near Cairns and from 
the Rocky Scrub, Cape York Pen.). The 
different forms of this group are distin- 
guished mainly by elytral color pattern: 
linceUa has a relatively simple pattern of 
3 pale lines on each elytron ( Fig. 49 ) ; 
queenslandica, a complex pattern of short 
lines, with 1 or 2 longer lines formed by 
fusion of short ones (Fig. 50); and papuana, 
a c. intennediate but very variable pattern 
(Figs. 48, A). Some specimens from New 
Guinea have elytral markings like those of 
the type (from New Britain) as described 
by Sloane. 

The elytral pattern of papuana may be 
genetically dimorphic at some localities 
(cf. the dimorphism of markings described 
for se.xualis), but the variation as a whole 
is so complex that I have been unable to 
analyze it satisfactorily. 

Minuthodes rossi n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 51; brownish piceous, 
elytra with pattern of many short narrow 
longitudinal pale lines in 3 transverse series; 
head and prothorax moderately shining al- 
though closely punctate, elytra roughened 
and duller, and upper surface especially 
elytra with short pubescence. Head 0.71 
width prothorax, narrower than usual in 
genus. Prothorax: width/length 1.79; base/ 
apex 1.21; sides irregularly broadly rounded, 
almost subangulate at middle, slightly 
sinuate before well defined but slightly 
obtuse basal angles; median-lateral setae 
near middle of prothoracic length. Elytra: 



width elytra/prothorax 1.37; outer-apical 
angles broadly rounded, apices subangulate 
c. opposite ends 2nd intervals, sutural 
angles narrowly rounded. Secondary sexual 
characters of i as for genus; 9 unknown. 
Measurements: length 6.5; width 3.2 mm. 

Type. Holotype $ (California Acad.) 
from Maffin Bay, West N. G., Sept. 1944 
(E. S. Ross); the type is unique. 

Notes. This seems to be a distinct species 
although known from a single specimen 
from a well collected lowland locality. 

Minuthodes sedlacekorum n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 52; irregular reddish 
piceous with complex elytral pattern of 
many short longitudinal pale lines in 3 
irregular transverse series, appendages ir- 
regular testaceous and brown; upper sur- 
face including elytra shining although 
pubescent and moderately closely punctate. 
Head 0.74 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.78; base apex 1.23; sides 
broadly arcuate, slightly sinuate before well 
defined posterior angles; median-lateral 
setae near middle of prothoracic length. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.49; outer- 
apical angles broadly rounded, sutural 
angles narrowly rounded; striae coarsely 
but irregularly punctate, intervals more 
finely punctate. Secondary sexual char- 
acters of S as described for genus; $ un- 
known. Measurements: length 4.6-4.8; 
width 2.3 mm. 

Type. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1050 m, 
Sept. 16, 1961 (Sedlaceks); 1 £ paratvpe 
(M.C.Z., Type No. 31,588), Pindiu, Huon 
Pen., N-E. N. G., 870-1300 m, Apr. 21-22, 
1963 ( Straatman ) . 

Notes. More material may show that 
this is a (distinct) geographic representa- 
tive of the preceding species, rossi. 

Minuthodes subnitens n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
black, elytra with pattern (Fig. 53) of 
many short longitudinal pale lines in 3 



98 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



irregular transverse series, appendages red- 
dish testaceous; rather shining although 
whole upper surface rather closely punctate 
and short-pubescent. Head 0.74 width pro- 
thorax; as usual in genus except labrum 
broadly emarginate at apex (an individual 
rather than specific character?). Protliorax: 
width length 1.84; base apex 1.25; base 
more lobed than usual; sides broadly arcu- 
ate, sinuate before c. right posterior angles, 
with median-lateral setae near middle of 
length. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.44; outer-apical angles broadly and sutural 
angles more narrowly rounded; striae im- 
pressed but not more coarsely punctate 
than intervals. Secondary sexual characters 
of 6 as for genus; 9 imknown. Measure- 
ments: length 6.2; width 2.(S mm. 

Type. Holotype $ (British Mus.) from 
Mt.'Baduri, Japen Is., West N. G., 1000 ft. 
(305 m), Aug. 1938 (Cheesman); the type 
is unique. 

Notes. This may (or may not) be a 
(distinct) geographic representative of the 
2 preceding species, ro.ssi and sedlacekorum. 

Minufhodes metallica n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
lorm as in Figure 47; black, elytra with 
strong blue-purple reflections, appendages 
dark brown; shining but short-pubescent, 
head and disc of pronotum sparsely punc- 
tulate, elytra rather closely punctate as 
well as punctulate. Head 0.79 width pro- 
thorax. Frothorax: width length 1.98; base 
ajiex 1.15; sides rather strongly rounded 
anteriorly, nearly straight and conxerging 
posteriorly until abruptly sinuate just be- 
fore c. right posterior angles; median-lat- 
eral setae c. V-s of prothoracic length from 
apex. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.41; 
outer-apical angles broadly and sutural 
angles more narrowly rounded; striae 
obsolete. Secondary sexual characters of 
6 as lor genus; 9 unknown. Measure- 
ments: IcngUi 5.0; width 2.6 mm. 

Type. Holotype,' ( Briti.sh Mus.) from 
Kokoda, Papua. 1300 ft. (c. 400 m). Sept. 
1933 ( (>hecsinan j; 1 ,^ paratope ( S. Aus- 



trahan Mus.), Mt. Lamington, Papua, 
1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m) (McNamara). 
Notes. This is the only metallic Minu- 
thodes know n from New Guinea. 

Minufhodes sexualis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
fonn as in Figure 55; black or brownish 
black, appendages dark, elytra either with- 
out markings or each with 1 pale dash on 
5th interval behind middle; shining, pubes- 
cence of most of upper surface absent or 
so short as scarcely to be visible. Head 
0.88 and 0.86 width prothorax; front 
sparsely punctulate. Prothorax wide but 
with relatively narrow base; width length 
2.03 and 2.03; base apex 0.98 and 1.00; 
median-lateral setae c. % of prothoracic 
length from apex; disc sparsely punctulate. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.35 and 
1.34; outer-apical angles broadly rounded, 
sutural angles blunted or subdenticulate 
(slightly variable); striae impressed and 
punctate; intervals con\ex, without distinct 
reticulate microsculpture, sparsely irregu- 
larly punctate or punctulate. Secondary 
sexual characters: S as for genus; 9 usu- 
ally with last \entral segment with con- 
spicuous c. square excision at apex, and 
9 always with a short ridge or blunt tooth 
on anterior edge hind femur near apex. 
Measurements: length 4.5-5.6; width 2.0- 
2.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type Xo. 
31,404) and 1 9 paratype from Dobodma, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratopes as lollows, all from 
Papua: 7, Oro Ba\ near Dobodura, Dec. 
1943-Jan. 1944 (Darlnigton); 2. Kokoda- 
Pitoki, 450 m. Mar. 24, U)56 (C;ressitt); 1. 
Mafuhi, 4000 ft. (1220 m), Dc>c. 1933 
(C:heesman); 1, "Daradac iTn," 80 km N. 
Port Moresby, 500 m, St«pt. 6, 1959 ( T. C. 
Maa, Bishoi:) Mus.); 1, Koitakinunui, Apr. 
1, 1918 (|. T. Ziminir, Chicago Mus.); 
10, Mt. Lamington, 1300-1500 It. ( r. 400- 
460 m) (McNamara. S. Australian Mus.). 

Measured s))ecinicns. A 6 paratNj^e from 
Kokoda-Pitoki and the ? hol()t\ii(\ 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



99 



Notes. This species is evidently closely 
related to M. bradujdcra Chaudoir of the 
Moluccas (described from Batjan Is. and 
represented by a series from Morotai Is. 
in the M.C.Z.), but sexualis lacks the 
metallic tone of the elytra of J)i(icliydcm, 
and the ridge or tooth of the 9 femur, not 
quite apical in scxiialis, is fully apical in 
hrachijdera. These 2 forms, with the "sub- 
species" described below, may eventually 
be considered conspecific, but I prefer to 
treat the New Guinean populations as a 
separate species until their interrelationships 
are better understood. 

The material before me suggests that 
sexualis may be dimorphic in two ways. 
The pale dash on the elytron is either 
present or absent but never partially de- 
veloped in all specimens seen, and is some- 
times present or absent in different in- 
dividuals from single localities, for example 
in those from Oro Bay. And, although most 
females have a square excision on the last 
ventral segment as described, 1 of 2 fe- 
males from Dobodura has the last ventral 
segment only acutely emarginate. 

Minufhodes sexualis signata n. subsp. 

Description. As typical sexualis (above) 
except for markings ( Figs. 56, A ) : elytra 
each with a broad posthumeral spot and 
usually also a narrow stripe behind middle 
(chiefly on 5th interval but bent inward 
posteriorly) reddish or yellow^ (some in- 
dividuals from Wau have only the post- 
humeral stripe, as noted below). Head 
0.89 and 0.90 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.96 and 2.02; base/apex 1.03 
and 1.02. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.41 and 1.42. Secondary sexual characters 
as in typical sexualis. Measurements: 
length 4.;3-5.8; width 2.0-2.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,405) and 3 paratypes from Sambeang, 
Mongi Watershed, Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., 
400 m, Apr. 21, 1955 (E. O. Wilson); and 
additional paratypes as follows, all from 
N-E. N. G.: 1, Butala, Mongi R., Huon 
Pen., Apr. 22, 1955 (Wilson, M.C.Z.); 2, 



lower Busu R., Huon Pen., Apr. 22 and May 
12, 1955 (Wilson, M.C.Z.), in lowland rain 
forest; 2, Finschhafen, Apr. 17 and May — , 
1944 (E. S. Ross, California Acad.); 1, 
Wantoat, Finisterre Rge., 4000 ft. (1220 
m), Sept. 9, 1957 (Munroe & Holland, 
Canadian National Coll.); 1, Lae, 10 m, 
July 5, 1962 (Sedlacek); 9, Wareo, Finsch- 
hafen (L. Wagner, S. Australian Mus.); 
16, Simbang, Huon Gulf, 1898 (Biro). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 11, 
Wau, Morobe Dist., altitudes from 1050 to 
1200 m, dates in Jan., Mar., Aug., Sept., 
Oct., 1961-1963 (Sedlaceks). West N. G.: 
42, from localities scattered from Hollandia 
to the Vogelkop. 

Measured specimens. A c5 paratype from 
Finschhafen and the 9 holotype. 

Notes. Because this species varies geo- 
graphically, I have restricted the type series 
to specimens from a few localities in a 
comparatively small area. 

The elytral markings are essentially con- 
stant, with only minor variation, in all 
specimens except those from Wau, of which 
only 4 have typical markings, while 7 have 
markings reduced to a single posthumeral 
dash on each elytron (Fig. 56 A). I have 
seen no intermediates between these two 
patterns. Inheritance of marking in this 
case, as in typical sexualis, may be simply 
Mendelian. 

Minufhodes simplex n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 54; black, not marked, 
appendages brown; surface shining but 
short-pubescent, head and prothorax punc- 
tulate, elytra more closely punctate. Head 
0.79 width prothorax. Prothorax: width/ 
length 2.0; base apex 1.15; sides irregularly 
rounded anteriorly, nearly straight and con- 
verging posteriorly, abruptly sinuate just 
before c. right posterior angles; median- 
lateral setae c. Vs of prothoracic length from 
apex. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.45; 
outer-apical angles broadly rounded, apices 
bluntly subangulate opposite ends 2nd in- 
tervals, sutural angles narrowly rounded; 



100 



BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



striae impressed, not well defined, not 
specially punctate. Secandanj .sexual char- 
acters of 6 unknown; of 9 normal, with- 
out special characters of sexualis. Measure- 
ments: length 4.7; width 2.4 mm. 

Type. Holotype $ (Manson Valentine 
Coll.) from Goodenough Is., Papua, Oct. 
14, 1943 (W. B. Jones); the type is unique. 

Notes. I do not know whether this in- 
sular species is represented on New Guinea 
proper. 

Minufhodes regularis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
black or brownish black, appendages 
brownish testaceous, elytra each with c. 
regular posthumeral and subapical spots 
reddish yellow (Fig. 57); rather shining al- 
though surface pubescent and head and 
pronotum irregularly punctulate or punc- 
tate and elytra more closely punctate. Head 
0.81 and 0.79 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.96 and 1.96; base/apex 1.13 
and 1.18; sides rounded anteriorly, c. 
straight and converging posteriorly, briefly 
but often abruptly sinuate before c. right 
or slightly blunted posterior angles; median- 
lateral setae c. Vy. of prothoracic length 
from apex. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 
1.46 and 1.44; outer-apical angles broadly 
and sutural angles narrowly rounded; striae 
impressed but not sharj^ly limited and not 
more coarsely punctate than intervals. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters as for genus. Mea- 
surements: length 4.0-5.3; width 2.1-2.8 
mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,406) and 3 jiaratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 1, 
Fly R. 5 miles l)elow Palmer R., May 23- 
31, 1936 (Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.). N-E. 
N. {,.: 1, Saidor, Gabumi Village, Finis- 
terre Rge., July 1-21, 1958 {\\ . \\ . Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.);'2, Wan, Morobe Dist., 1150, 
1200 in, Sept. 7, 1961, Sept. 26-27, 1964 
(Sedlaceks); 1, Swart Vy., Karubaka, 1500 
m, Sept. 20, 1958 (Gressitt), in light trap; 
1, W'cwak, 2-20 m. Oct. 11, 1957 (Gressitt). 



West N. G.: 1, vie. Hollandia, July-Sept. 
1944 (Darlington); 1, same locality, 60 m, 
Nov. 26, 1954 (L. D. Brongersma, Leiden 
Mus.); 1, Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 (E. S. 
Ross, California Acad.); 1, Sibil, Star Rge., 
1260 m, Aug. 24, 1959 (Leiden Mus.); 1. 
mountain slope above Bernhard Camp, 100 
m, Apr. 1939 (Toxopeus). 

Measured .specimens. The i holotype and 
1 $ paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. M. rcfiularis is apparently widely 
distributed in New Guinea at moderate 
altitudes. 

Minufhodes irregularis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
black, elytra each with 2 (posthumeral 
and subapical ) irregular reddish yellow 
spots (Fig. 58), antennae and palpi red- 
dish testaceous, legs much darker; rather 
shining although surface short-pubescent, 
head punctulate at middle and strigose at 
sides, pronotal disc ± punctulate, elytra 
more closely punctate and in part faintly 
microreticulate. Head 0.75 and 0.77 width 
prothorax, as described for gt^nus except 
strigose at sides and with labrum distinctly 
emarginate (both specimens). Prothorax: 
width length 1.97 and 1.86; base/apex 1.12 
and 1.11; sides broadly rounded, converging 
posteriorly, briefly sinuate before c. right 
posterior angles; median-lateral setae c. 'a 
(or slightly more) of prothoracic length 
from apex. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.34 and 1.42; outer-apical angles broadly 
and sutural angles narrow I\ rounded; striae 
impressed but not sharj-)!) limited and not 
more coarseK' punctate than intervals. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters oi S normal; 9 
unknown. Mca.suroncnts: length 5.5-5.8; 
w idth 2.8-2.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (U.S.N. M.) and 1 S 
ixuatype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,407) both 
from Hollandia, West N. (;.. May 1945 
(B. Malkin). 

Notes. This and th(> preceding .species 
{reij,tdaris) are supcrlicialK sinu'lar, but 
fh(> two are s\'miiatric and diHcr in sig- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 101 



nificant details, and they may not be 
closely related. 

Genus CAJASCOPUS Kirby 

Kirby 1825, Trans. Linncan Soc. London 14, p. 94. 

Wallace 1863, in Saunders, Trans. Ent. Soc. Lon- 
don (3) 1, pp. 460-461 (habits). 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1362 (see for additional references). 

Andrewes 1937, Proc. R. Ent. Soc. London ( B ) 
6, pp. 187 ff. (key to species of India, etc.). 

Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carabiques de la Region 
Malgache, Part 2, p. 1007 (in text). 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 397. 

Diapwsis. See Key to Genera of Lehiini 
of New Guinea. In practice most Catascoptis 
can be recognized by their medium to large 
size (in the tribe), form (with prominent 
eyes, etc.), and usually metallic coloration, 
without geometric elytral markings. 

Deseription (characters common to New 
Guinean species of the genus, with ex- 
ceptions noted). Form variable (Figs. 59- 
64), slender and convex to broad and 
depressed; color metallic (except in bnm- 
neus), usually green, sometimes partly or 
wholly blue or purple; size c. 8-22 mm; 
upper surface not pubescent, more or less 
shining (elytra sometimes dull), with micro- 
sculpture present or absent, if present c. 
isodiametric on head, somewhat transverse 
on pronotum and elytra. Head with promi- 
nent eyes; 2 setae over each eye; front 
longitudinally impressed each side; clypeus 
± emarginate, 1-setose each side; labrum 
long, rounded at apex, emarginate at apex, 
6-setose; antennae with 4 segments glabrous 
except for tactile setae and a little pubes- 
cence at apex 4th segment; mentum toothed; 
ligula 4-setose, paraglossae much longer, 
not setose; palpi slender. Prothorax quadrate 
or subcordate; base not lobed; lateral 
margins variable, each with 1 seta at base 
and 1 or more near or before middle; base 
with entire margin (except in dobodiira), 
apex at middle not margined or weakly so; 
disc with impressed middle line, deep pos- 
terior transverse impression, and usually 
weak (but variable) anterior transverse 



impression. Elytra with humeri prominent 
but rounded (humeral margins slightly 
thickened in laevigatiis); apices variable, as 
described for separate species, often toothed 
or spined; striae entire, punctation vari- 
able; 7th intervals usually and 5th some- 
times raised or carinate at base; .3rd inter- 
vals usually .3-punctate (2-punctate in 
Jatiis), with punctures often near middle of 
intervals (not on edges) but position vari- 
able. Inner icings full. Lower surface with 
some inconspicuous, short, sparse pubes- 
cence (much more pubescence along mid- 
line in tcaUacei group); last ventral seg- 
ment usually slightly, broadly (variably) 
emarginate in both sexes. Legs slender; 
4th hind-tarsal segments small, weakly 
emarginate; 5th segments with accessory 
setae; claws not toothed. Secondary sexual 
characters: i front tarsi slightly ( scarcely ) 
dilated, with 3 segments 2-seriately squamu- 
lose below; i with 1, $ 2 or 3 setae each 
side last ventral segment ( except i as well 
as 9 with 2 or 3 setae each side in strigicol- 
lis). 

Type species. C. hardwickei Kirby, of 
India. 

Generic distribution. Represented in 3 
separate tropical areas: numerous in trop- 
ical Asia and the Malay Archipelago ( and 
a few in tropical Australia); fewer in 
tropical Africa (absent in Madagascar); 
and probably represented also in tropical 
South and Central America (but Jeannel 
doubts whether the American species 
should be included in the genus). 

Notes. Although Catascopus occurs also 
in Africa and probably in tropical America, 
its headquarters are in tropical Asia and 
the Malay Archipelago. The greatest num- 
bers of species are on the Malay Pen. and 
the western part of the Archipelago, but 
the genus is well represented east to New 
Guinea, where 14 species are now known. 
Of these 14 species, elegans and smaragdulus 
range from the mainland of Asia across the 
islands to northern Australia; facialis, from 
Asia to western New Guinea but not Aus- 
tralia; and laevigatus is common to the 



102 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Moluccas and New Guinea. Most other 
New Guinean species of the genus are 
endemic, and one group of striking species 
(the icaUacei group) has probably evolved 
on New Guinea and is now represented 
there by at least 5 species. Only 5 
Catascoptis (2 of them endemic) occur 
in Australia, and they seem to represent 5 
separate invasions from New Guinea. So, 
tlie distribution of the genus suggests 
multiple dispersal eastward across the 
Malay Archipelago, with considerable spe- 
ciation and some secondary radiation on 
New Guinea, and minor invasions of north- 
ern Australia. 

All the Catascopus that I know live on 
tree trunks and fallen logs in rain forest. 
They are all winged, and very active. Con- 
cerning their habits, Wallace (1863) says, 

"The species of the yeniis Catascopus are senii- 
iiocturnal in their hal)its, never flying except 
at ni^ht. The species taken at Dorev (viz., 
WaUacei, W. W. S.; elongatus, W. ' W. S. 
[— Ilolcodcrus]; Anwnsis, W. W. S.; amncmis, 
Clniud. [= clcfi.ans]) flew against me at dusk. 
The greater part of the species and individuals 
I have taken have, however, been captured 
under the decaying bark of fallen trees. 

"As soon as the bark of a tree splits and 
cracks so as to separate it from the wood, 
the Cata-icnpi frecjuent it, I)ut I could scarcely 
ever capture them in that position, owing to their 
great activity and the force required to tear 
off the bark. After a tree has lain about a year 
the bark Ix'coines rotten and can be easily 
broken off, and tlicii, 1)\ thi' assistance of a 
net, the insects which lurk beneath it can be 
more easily caplincd. 'I'lu> larger species found 
in Malacca, Borneo and Singapore used fre- 
(juently to be seen coursing along the surface 
of some immense fallen trees, from one crack 
to another, their brilliant lioihes glittering 
splendidly in the sunlight. 

"To capture them was by no means easy, as 
they would get under the trunk where it touched 
the ground, if closely pursued and no friendly 
crevice was at hantl. Many an hour ha\e 1 
pleasantly spent in hunting them in tiie dcMise 
swampy forests of Borneo, hi Malacca and 
Singapore the spice of fear and danger would be 
added to the interest of the .sport, owing to the 
jirobable vicinity of tigers, who might at any 
moment be watching us as eagerly and with as 
di-atlly a puipose as we were watching the poor 
Catascopi. 



"However closely pursued 1 ha\e never seen 
one of these insects fly in the day time, neither 
do they come out at all into the light, except 
to \'isit some part of the trunk they reside in, 
to which the subcortical passages do not ex- 
tend. . . . The species and indi^■iduals of this 
genus are much more abundant in Malacca and 
Borneo than in the equally luxuriant forests of 
the Molucas and New Guinea." 

Key to Species of Catascopus of New Guinea 

1. Elytral apices without acute teeth or spines 
at or near sutural angles 2 

- Elytral apices acutely toothed or spined at 
or near sutural angles 4 

2. Outer elytral angles rounded or \ery 
obtusely angulate 3 

- Outer elytral angles right or (if obtuse) 
very well defined, sometimes denticulate; 
length c. 10.5-13.5 mm (p. 103) ._ facialis 

3. Color metallic green or blue; length c. 8.5- 
10 mm (p. 103) elegans 

- Color brown or bronze; length c. 12-13 
mm ( see also Notes under this species ) 
(p. 104) Inuniieus 

4. Prothorax with 2 or more lateral setae 
near or before middle on each side ( if 
setae broken off, positions shown by punc- 
tures ) ; Unm relatixely broad and de- 
pressed 5 

- Prothorax with only 1 median-lateral seta 
each side; form variable but often more 
slender and convex 7 

5. Two or 3 setae near or before middle each 
side; length 17.5 mm ( see also Descrip- 
tion) (p. 104) latus I 

More (often 6) such setae each side ,. (•> 

6. Elytral striae lightb' impressed; ehtral 
margins wider than usu;il near middle; 
length r. 10-11 mm (p. 104) _ laeiifJiattis 

- Elytral striae deepiT; ehtnil margins less 
wide; length r. 12-13 mm (.see also 
l)('scri))tii»i ) (p. 105) siiliis 

7. Outer ehtral angles blunt or angulate 
hut not si^ined; relati\ely small species, 
usu;d!> untler 1 1 mm 8 

- Outer elytral angles spined; larger species, 
13-21 mm {icaUacci group) 10 

8. Outer el\ tr;il ;uigles rounded or obtuse; 
smaller, 'r. 7.5-8.0 nun (p. 105) _. . 

_ stnaragduhis 

- Outer elytral angles u.sually c. right or 
acute, or if obtuse, size larger 9 

9. I'rothoraeic margins narrow ( almost as in 
dedans); basal marginal line of pronotum 
c. obsolet(>; reticulate microsculpture oii- 
.solcle on disc of el\tra; length r. 9-10 
nnii (p. 106) . - clohoduro 

- I'rothoracic margins slightly wider; b;isal 
nuirginal line ol prothorax impres.sed; 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 103 



reticulate microsculptuie distinct on disc 
of elytra; length 8.7-9.3 mm (p. 106) . hiroi 

10. Prothoracic margins moderate 11 

- Prothoracic margins wider (see Descrip- 
tions ) 13 

1 1 . Fifth elytral inter\ als not or not much 
raised near base; length c. 13-15.5 mm 
(p. 107) aruensis 

- Fifth as well as 7th elytral inter\'als 
raised near base; usually larger 12 

12. Prothorax more rjuadrate with blunter 
posterior angles; head and prothorax ± 
green, elytra blue-purple (note head colored 
as prothorax); length c. 15-18 mm (p. 
108 ) strigicollis 

- Prothorax more cordate, with more acute 
posterior angles; prothorax green or 
cupreous, head and elytra blue-purple 
(note head colored as elytra); length c. 
15-20 mm ( p. 108 ) wallacei 

13. Prothorax narrower (width/length c. 1.40); 
head less depressed posteriorly; head dark, 
pronotum green cupreous, elytra blue- 
purple or blue-green; length c. 17-22 
mm (p. 109) taylori 

- Prothorax wider (width/length c. 1.70); 
head more depressed posteriorly; head as 
well as prothorax green, elytra blue-green; 
length c. 20 mm (p. 109) rex 

Cafascopus facialis (Wiedemann) 

Wiedemann 1819, Zoologisches Magazin 1, 3, p. 

165 (Corahus). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Haipalinae 7, 

p. 1364 (see for synonymy, "varieties," and 

many additional references not concerned with 

New Guinea ) . 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 382, 395 

( "fascialis" ) . 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form rather compact; 
green or blue and green; elytra with outer- 
apical angles well defined, apices sometimes 
subangulate (variable) near suture, striae 
deeply impressed and strongly punctate, 
and 5th and 7th intervals raised; length (in 
New Guinea) c. 10.5-13.5 mm. 

Tijpe(s). From "Bengalia," in Copen- 
hagen Univ. Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. West N. G. : 
1, Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
"Dorey" (Paris Mus.). Also 1 specimen 
labeled only "N. guin" ( British Mus. ) . 

Notes. If my identifications are correct, 



this species ranges from SE. Asia to the 
Philippines, Moluccas, and (western) 
New Guinea but does not reach Australia. 
It is variable, and its full synonymy and 
subspecies (if any) remain to be worked 
out. It is rare in New Guinea and may be 
confined to the western part of the island 
(perhaps it has recently arrived from the 
west). I found it common on Morotai Is. 
in the Moluccas. 

Cafascopus elegans (Weber) 

Weber 1801, Observations Entomologicae, p. 45 

(Elaphnis). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1363 (see for additional references and ex- 
tensive synonymy ) . 
Andrewes 1937, Proc. Ent. Soc. London for 1937 

(B) 6, p. 189. 
Van Emden 1937, Stettiner Ent. Zeitschrift 98, 

p. 35 (as subsp. australasiac Hope). 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 380, 

385. 
amoenus Chaudoir 1861, Berliner Ent. Zeitschrift 

5, p. 120. 
obliquatus Fairmaire 1881, Le Naturaliste 3, p. 

381 ( new synonymy ) . 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form convex; green or 
partly coppery; prothoracic margins nar- 
row; elytral apices unarmed; in general 
without striking characters; length c. 8.5- 
10 mm. 

Types. Of elegans, from Sumatra (col- 
lected by Doldorf ) , present location of type 
unknown; of amoenus, from Dorey, West 
N. G., now in Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus.; 
of obliquatus, from New Britain, presum- 
ably now in Paris Mus. (none seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Very com- 
mon (about 200 specimens) throughout 
New Guinea, chiefly at low altitudes (in- 
cluding Dobodura), but reaching 1700 m 
near Wan. 

Notes. The range of elegans, including 
its supposed subspecies and varieties 
(which need further study), is from SE. 
Asia to Australia, east at least to the 
Philippines and Solomons. 

The name obliqiuitus Fairmaire has been 



104 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



overlooked by most authors, and the cita- 
tion in Csiki is incorrect. The description 
clearly is based on a small specimen of 
the present species, which is common in 
New Britain. 

Cafascopus brunneus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 59, compact and convex 
(in genus); brown, subaeneous, append- 
ages brown; rather shining, reticulate micro- 
sculpture faint on head, light on pronotum 
and elytra. Head large, 0.97 and 0.97 width 
prothorax; front irregularly sculptured and 
in part sparsely punctulatc. ProtJiorax 
square-cordate; width/length 1.38 and 1.37; 
base/apex 1.01 and 0.96; margins moderate; 
disc lightly transversely strigulose and 
punctulatc. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 
c. 1.53 and 1.59 (but elytra warped so mea- 
surements inexact); humeri very prominent, 
almost subangulate ( narrowly rounded ) an- 
teriorly; apices oblique, scarcely sinuate, 
with outer angles scarcely indicated (very 
l)roadly rounded) and sutural angles nar- 
rowly rounded and sometimes minutely 
denticulate; striae well impressed, faintly 
punctulatc; no intei'vals specially elevated 
at liase. Measurements: length c. 12-13; 
width c. 4.4-5.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ ( Bishop Mus. ) and 
1 9 paratype from Goilala, Tapini, Owen 
Stanley Rge., Papua, 975 m, Nov. 16-25, 
1957; and 2 additional paratypes (M.C.Z., 
Type No. 31,408) from Goilala, Loloipa, 
Owen Stanley Rge., Jan. 16-30, Feb. 1-15. 
1958 ( all these sp(>cimens, W. W. Brandt ) ; 
1 paratype (S. Australian Mus.), W'areo, 
Finsclihafcn, N-E. N. G. (L. Wagner). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Loloipa. 

Notes. This species is unusual in its 
rather compact form, j)]ain brown-aeneous 
color, and simple elytral apices (excejit lor 
minute, variable denticles near sutural 
angles). So far as I know, il is not closely 
related to any previously described species. 
Characters distinguishing it from other 
species are given in the preceding Key. 



Cafascopus lafus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 60, very broad, depressed; 
head and pronotum dark green, elytra 
purple, lower surface and appendages red- 
dish black; head and pronotum shining with 
reticulate microsculpture absent or faint, 
elytra dull and closely microreticulate. 
Head 0.87 width prothorax; front flat, 
broadly irregularly impressed. Prothorax 
wide-subcordate; width length 1.77; base/ 
apex 0.97; side margins rather narrow (in 
relation to width of prothorax ) , moderately 
reflexed, left with 3, right with 2 formerly- 
seta-bearing punctures at and before mid- 
dle. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.36; 
humeri broad but margin not thickened 
and not subangulate; margins rather nar- 
row; outer-apical angles prominent, slightly 
acute; apices with moderate spines c. op- 
posite ends sutural striae; striae moderateh' 
impressed, scarcely punctulatc; intervals 
not elevated at base, punctulatc especially 
along middle, 3rd with onl\' 2 dorsal punc- 
tures, less than ^4 from base and near or 
behind middle (position unsymmetric). 
Measurements: length 17.5; width 6.3 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (British Mus.) from 
W. Tami R., Pukusan-Humboldt Bav Dist., 
West N. G., June 1937 {\\ . Stiiber); the 
type is unique. 

Notes. This striking and thoroughh' dis- 
tinct species is snfficientK' compared with 
others in the Key to Species of Catascopus 
of New Guinea. 

Catascopus laevigatus Saunders 

SauiKlns lcS63, Trans. Kiit. Sov. Loiulon (3) 1, 

p. 458, pi. 18, fi,t,^ 2a-l). 
Csiki 1932, Colcop. C"at., Caiabidae, Harpalinac 7, 

p. 1365 (sor for additional rcfrrcnces ). 

Description ( for recognition only). With 
charact(M-s of genus; wide and d(^pr(\ssed; 
green, shining; el\lra with sutural angles 
spined, outer-apical ehtral angles c. right; 
length c. 10-1 1 mm. 

Ty))es. From ''Batch ian. Ternate and 
Am. Wallace," type now in ObcM'thiir 
C^oll. I'aiis Mus. (not seen). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



105 



Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Twenty-four, 
from numerous localities in all 3 political 
divisions of New Guinea; occurs at Do- 
bodura and up to 1200 m at Wau. 

Notes. I have seen specimens also from 
the Am Is. and from Biiru, Cerain, and 
Halniahera (Jilolo) in the Moluccas. The 
closely related C. laticoUis Macleay of North 
Queensland (Kuranda and Atherton Table- 
land, and Coen-Rocky Scrub areas) repre- 
sents the species in Australia. 

Caiascopus sidus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 61; rather wide but less 
depressed than laevig,atus; green, elytra 
blue purple with green humeri ( at Wau ) or 
c. wholly green (Star Rge.) or c. wholly 
purple (Japen Is.), lower surface and ap- 
pendages dark brown; shining, reticulate 
microsculpture faint on front and on disc 
of pronotum, distinct on elytra. Head 0.93, 
0.90, 0.92 width prothorax; front irregularly 
impressed at middle, sparsely minutely 
(scarcely detectably) punctulate. Prothorax 
transverse-cordate with wide base; width/ 
length 1.57, 1.61, 1.47; base/apex 1.14, 1.13, 
1.13; side margins broader and more re- 
flexed than in lacvi^atus, each with c. 6 
strong setae (or punctures) in anterior %; 
disc almost without transverse strigulation, 
faintly and sparsely (hardly detectably) 
punctulate. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 
c. 1.49, 1.54, 1.57; humeri prominent but 
with margins rounded (not widened and 
subangulate as in laevigatiis); outer-apical 
angles well defined, c. right or nearly so; 
apices with short spines not quite at sutural 
angles; striae well impressed, scarcely punc- 
tate ( more impressed but less punctate than 
in laevigatas ) ; intervals scarcely elevated at 
base. Secondarij sexual characters as de- 
scribed for genus. Measurements: length c. 
12-13; width 4.6-5.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1200 m, 
Sept. 15-30, 1962 (Sedlacek); 1 i paratype, 
same locality, 1250 m, Sept. 16, 1962 ( Sed- 
laceks); 1 paratype, Mt. Missim (near Wau), 



1600 m, Mar. 17, 1966; 7 paratypes, Wau 
Ck., 1200-1500 m, Sept. 16-18, 1964 (M. 
Sedlacek) (some paratypes in M.C.Z., Type 
No. 31,409). 

Additional material. West N. G. : 1 ^ , 
Sibil, Star Rge., 1260 m. May 16, 1959 
(Leiden Mus.), at light; 1 S, Mt. Baduri, 
Japen Is., 1000 ft. (305 m), Aug. 1938 
( Cheesman ) . 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
the c^ S from Star Rge. and Japen Is., in 
this order. 

Notes. Although similar to laevigatas, 
sidus is more convex, with wider and more 
reflexed prothoracic margins, and other dif- 
ferential characters noted in the preceding 
description. The single specimens from 
Star Rge. and Japen Is. differ from the 
types in color of elytra (see Description, 
above) but I do not wish to call them 
subspecies without seeing more material. 

Caiascopus smaragdulus Dejean 

Dejean 1825, Species General Coleop. 1, p. 331. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Haq:)alinae 7, 
p. 1366 (see for additional references and 
synonymy, which do not concern New Guinea). 

Description (for recognition only). With 
characters of genus; small, rather broad; 
green or partly coppery; prothorax with 
margins wider than in clegans and set off 
by submarginal longitudinal swellings; 
elytra with outer-apical angles rounded or 
bluntly obtuse, apices each with an acute 
tooth or short spine; intervals not elevated 
at base; length 8 mm or less. 

Type(s). From Java; now in Oberthiir 
Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Seventeen 
specimens from localities in all 3 political 
divisions of New Guinea and from Nor- 
manby Is.; at low altitudes only. 

Notes. C. smaragdulus ranges from the 
southern corner of Asia (Burma, etc.) to 
New Guinea, New Britain, and the north- 
eastern corner of Australia (specimens 
from the Rocky Scrub, mid-peninsular 
Cape York, taken by me in June 1932). 

In this species the width of the prothorax 



106 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



and the development of elytral spines vary 
both individually and, I think, geographi- 
cally, but I do not have enough material 
from outside New Guinea to define satis- 
factory subspecies. 

Catascopus dobodura n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 62 ) c. average with elytra rather 
wide but convex; green, elytra sometimes 
greenish castaneous or purplish laterally, 
lower surface almost black, appendages 
dark brown; shining, reticulate microsculp- 
ture absent or nearly so on front, pronotum, 
and disc of elytra, indicated toward sides 
and apex of eUtra. Head 1.01 and 1.01 
\\'idth prothorax; front slightly depressed 
anteriorly and longitudinally impressed each 
side. Prothorax quadrate-subcordate; width 
length 1.44 and 1.42; base/apex 1.08 and 
1.04; sides broadly rounded anteriorly with 
anterior angles only a little advanced, 
strongly sinuate c. % of length before right 
or slightly acute basal angles; side margins 
very narrow, not set off by longitudinal 
swc^llings, each with usual seta at basal 
angle and 1 median-lateral seta just before 
middle; basal transverse impression deep 
(as usual) but basal marginal line obsolete 
at middle; disc with faint transverse strigae 
and faint sparse punctulation. Elytra : 
width elytra/prothorax — and 1.59 (elytra 
of S too spread to measure); lateral mar- 
gins moderate; outer-apical angles c. right 
or slightly obtuse but distinct, apices each 
will) spine c. opposite end 2nd interval; 
striae moderately impressed, faintly punc- 
tulale; intervals no! elevated at base. Mea- 
surements: length e. 9-10; width c. 3.4- 
3.8 mm. 

Ti/i)es. llolotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,410) from Oro Bay, Papua, Dec. 1943- 
jaii. 1944 ( Darlington ); and 1 9 paratyjK' 
Iroin Dobodura (near Oro Bay), Mar.-Julv 
1944 (Darlington). 

Other material. One 9 , Kiunga, Fly R., 
July 2.3-25, 1957 (\V. W. Brandt. Bishop 
Mus.). 



Measured specimens. The types. 

Notes. It is surprising to find a new, 
medium-small, green Catascopus at low 
altitudes in Papua, but the species seems 
clearly distinct. In form ( except that it is 
a little broader) and narrow prothoracic 
margins it resembles ele<ians but is im- 
mediately distinguished by spined elytral 
apices, reduction of microreticulation of 
elytra, and in other ways. In form of elytral 
apices and reduction of microreticulation 
it somewhat resembles laevii!,atus but is 
more slender and convex, with only 1 
median-lateral pronotal seta on each side. 
The virtual obliteration of the middle part 
of the posterior marginal line of the pro- 
notum is diagnostic of this new species. 

Catascopus hiroi n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in preceding species (dobodura): 
gr(.>en or blue-green, \\'ith some coppery 
color at sides of elytra especially behind 
humeri, lower surface and appendages 
brown or brownish black; moderately 
shining, front and disc of pronotinn with 
reticulate microsculpture absent or vc^rx' 
light, but disc of eh'tra entirely (trans- 
versely) microreticulat(\ Head 0.99 and 
1.00 width prothorax; front flat, slightK' 
irregularly depressed, and with (usual) 
longitudinal impression each side. Pro- 
tliorax quadiati'-subcordatc; \\'idth IcMigth 
1.41 and 1.34; base apex 1.13 and 1.08; 
sides broadly arcuate anteriorlw sometimes 
laintly angulate at median-lateral seta, 
sinuat(> slightly less than ^i before right or 
slightly acute basal angles; lateral margins 
narrow but paralleled b\' slightly swollen 
ridges acccMituating the marginal channels, 
each with usual seta at basal angle and 1 
median-lateral seta slightK' before middle; 
basal marginal line entire in all specimens. 
Elytra: width eKtra inothorax 1.63 and 
1.58; ontei-apical angles sharplx delined, 
right or slightK acute; apices each with 
short spine near but not (juite at sutural 
angle; striae well im]ii(\sse(l, slightK" iiune- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



107 



tulate; intervals convex, not elevated at 
base, punctulate. Measurements (of types): 
length 8.7-9.3; width 3.5-3.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype S ( Hungarian National 
Mus.) and 2 paratypes from Stephansort, 
Astrolabe Bay, N-E. N. G., 1897 (Biro); 
and 1 paratype, Erima, Astrolabe Bay, 
1897 (Biro). (Two paratvpes now in 
M.C.Z., Type No. 31,411.) 

Additional material. West N. G.: 1, 
Waigeu Is., Camp 1, Mt. Nok, 2500 ft. (c. 
760 m ), May 1938 ( Cheesman ) . This speci- 
men is a (5 larger than the types (c. 11 
mm ) and \\\\h disc of pronotum more 
distinctly microreticulate, but it seems 
clearly referable to hiroi. 

Measured speeimens. The c5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Stephansort. 

Notes. This is another medium-small, 
green species presumably related to the 
preceding one (dobodura) but differing 
in a number of details, including entire 
basal marginal line of pronotum, presence 
of distinct reticulate microsculpture on disc 
of elytra, and position of elytral spines, 
which are closer to the suture in bird than 
in dobodura. 

Cafascopus wallacei group 

Catascopus wallacei Saunders and its im- 
mediate relatives, including all the remain- 
ing New Guinean species of the genus, 
treated below, fonn an apparently natural 
group of large, often conspicuously colored 
species characterized by having both sutural 
and outer-apical elytral angles acutely 
toothed or spined and by having a longi- 
tudinal zone of dense, conspicuous pubes- 
cence along the midline of the body, from 
prosternum almost to the tip of the ab- 
domen in the i but mainly on the sterna 
in the $ . Otherwise the species of this 
group share the characters stated under the 
genus, with minor exceptions. 

The uallacei group of Catascopus centers 
on New Guinea, where 5 species are now 
known. Most of them are sympatric: 4 of 
the 5 species have been found at Wau. Of 



the 5 New Guinean species, aruensis and 
wallacei each reach one or more small 
islands to the west (Aru Is., Waigeu, Mysol), 
and aruensis reaches also New Britain, 
New Ireland, and Cape York in Australia. 
A sixth species of the group (chaudoiri 
Castelnau) is endemic in northern Aus- 
tralia. 

Some species of this group vary in- 
dividually in form especially of the pro- 
thorax, in degree of elevation of the 5th 
elvtral intervals, and in some other details. 
Although I can clearly recognize only the 
5 species treated below, Straneo (see refer- 
ences under the species) has distinguished 
others, and he may be right. A thorough 
study of long series will be required to 
decide this, including study of genitalic 
characters, which are indicated by Straneo. 
I am, incidentally, very much indebted to 
Prof. Straneo for loan of paratypes of his 
3 species of this group. 

Catascopus aruensis Saunders 

Saunders 1863, Trans. Ent. Soc. London (3) 1, 

p. 458, pi. 17, fig. 5a-b. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1362 (see for additional references and 

partial synonymy ) . 
Straneo 1943, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 61, p. 302. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 382, 

393. 
cupricoUis Chaudoir 1883, in R. Oberthiir, Coleop- 

terorum Novitates 1, p. 24 (not cupricoUis 

W'aterhouse 1877). 
brevispinosus Sloane 1910, Proc. Linnean Soc. 

New South Wales 35, pp. 398, 400 (new 

synonymy ) . 
aeneicollis Andrewes 1919, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 

(9) 3, p. 481 (new name for cupricoUis 

Chaudoir ) . 
Andrewes 1924, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) 14, 

p. 593. 
?dalbertisi Straneo 1943, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 

61, p. 304. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of wallacei group (above); green or 
blue-green (elytra rarely purplish); pro- 
thorax more square (less cordate) than in 
wallacei, but somewhat variable; elytra 
with outer-apical angles spined, sutural 
angles with shorter spines or simply acute 



108 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



(variable); 5th intervals not or not much 
elevated near base (slightly variable), 7th 
intervals subcarinate at base; length c. 13- 
15.5 mm. 

Types. Of aruensis Samiders, from "Aru 
[Is.]. Wallace," now in Oberthih- Coll., 
Paris Mus. Of cupricollis Chaudoir, from 
Fly R., New Guinea, now also in Oberthiir 
Coll., Paris Mus. Of brevispinostis Sloane, 
from Coen, Cape York, Australia, now in 
Sloane Coll., Canberra. Of dalhcHisi 
Straneo, holotype from Hatam, Papua, in 
Genoa Mus., and allotype from Andai, 
Papua, in Straneo Coll. (See Notes, below.) 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Widely 
distributed but much less common than 
wollaeei (below): 27 specimens, from all 
3 political divisions of New Guinea and 
from Normanby Is.; most from low alti- 
tudes but reaching 1200 m at \Vau. 

Notes. Outside New Guinea this species 
occurs on the Aru Is. (type locality), New- 
Britain, New Ireland, and Cape York, 
Australia (types of hrevispinosus) . Pos- 
sibly some of the outlying populations may 
hv distinguishable as subspecies. 

Of the types listed above, I have seen 
only those of hrevispinosus (briefly in 
1957, but Dr. B. P. Moore has sent me 
additional notes on them) and the allotype 
of (hilhertisi ( through the kindness of Prof. 
Straneo ) . 

Catascopus walJocei Saunders 

Saunders 1863, Trans. Ent. Soc. London (3) 1, p. 

462, pi. 17, fiK. 4a-l). 
Csiki 1932, Coloop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinac 7, 

p. 1367 (see for additional references). 
Straneo 1943, Ann. Mus. Civ. Cenoa 61, p. 302, 

fi.u;. a. 
ledlicka 1963, Ent. Ahliandlunuen 28, pp. 382, 

393. 
?heccarn Straneo 1943, Ann. Mus. Civ. (ienoa 61, 

p. 303, fig. h. 

Description. With characters of gcinis 
and of ualldcei group (above); usually 
brightly bicolored, with head and elytra 
purple and prothorax brassy or copjKMy, 
but coloration sometimes duller; prothorax 
a little more subcordat(> (less square) than 



in aruensis, with posterior angles more 
prominent and more acute; elytra with 
sutural as well as outer-apical angles spined; 
5th and 7th intervals elevated near base 
(slightly variable, especially the 5th); 
length c. 15-20 mm. 

Tijpes. Of icallacei Saunders, from "Wa- 
giou [Waigeu], Dorey and Mysol"; actual 
(holo)t\'pe now in Oberthiir Coll., Paris 
Mus. (not seen). Of beccarii Straneo, holo- 
type from Hatam, Papua, in Genoa Mus., 
and allot\'pe from Andai, Papua, in Straneo 
Coll. (allotype seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
probably throughout New Guinea: 176 
specimens before me (including 82 from 
Dobodura ) ; most from low altitudes, but 
reaching 1300 m near Wau. 

Notes. This beautiful carabid is appar- 
ently confined to New Guinea and zoogeo- 
graphically closely associated islands in- 
cluding Aru Is., Waigeu, and Mysol. It 
apparently does not reach the Moluccas 
proper, nor New Britain, nor Australia. 

Most of the indi\iduals from Dobodura 
were trapped imder strips of burlap laid 
across the trunks of fallen trees in rain 
forest. 

Catascopus strigicoHis Straneo 

Straneo 1943, .\nn. Mus. Ci\ . Cenoa 61, p. 305, 
fig. c. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of udllacei group, except S as well 
as 9 with 2 or 3 setae each side last ventral 
segment; bicolored, head and prothorax 
green or slighth' copper)", ebtra purple or 
(especialK- basally) bluish or greenish; pro- 
thorax almost square except sides sinuate 
posteriorly (as usual in group); c^Ktra with 
rather short spines at outer-apical angles 
and still shorter (slightl\- variable) ones 
at sutural angles; 5th as well as 7th interxals 
raised near bas(>; length r. 1.5-18 mm. 

Types. IIolot)pe (GcMioa Mus.) and 
allot\iK> (Straneo Coll.) both from .\ndai, 
Papua, Aug. 1872 (D'Albertis). I have 
examined the allotype, loaned b\' courtesy 
of Prof. Straneo. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



109 



Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: the 
types. N-E. N. G.: 21, Wau, Morobc Dist., 
altitudes from 900 to 1500 m, dates in Mar., 
Apr., May, July, Aug., Sept., Oct., Dee., 
1961-1964 (Sedlaceks); 1, Sattelberg, Huon 
Gulf, 1899 (Biro); 1, Wareo, Finschhafen 
(L. Wagner, S. Australian Mus.). 

Notes. This seems to be a distinct species, 
immediately distinguished from wallacci by 
head colored like pronotum ( not like 
elytra), elytral spines shorter, and other 
details, and from aruensis by 5th elytral 
intervals raised, size usually larger, and S 
with additional apical ventral setae. It 
may occur mainly in mountains rather than 
in lowlands, and it may be confined to part 
of eastern New Guinea, but further collect- 
ing is needed to confirm these possibilities. 

Cafascopus taylori n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of wallacei group; form (Fig. 63) of 
large wallacei; head black or very dark blue, 
prothorax brassy or slightly coppery, elytra 
blue purple, lower surface and appendages 
dark; head and pronotum rather shining 
with reticulate microsculpture absent or 
weak, elytra duller with close, slightly 
transverse reticulate microsculpture. Head 
0.77 and 0.81 width prothorax, impressed 
across base; front with usual 2 longitudinal 
impressions and slightly sculptured and 
irregularly punctulate posteriorly. Prothorax 
quadrate-subcordate; width length 1.55 and 
1.51; base/apex 1.08 and 1.10; sides broadly 
arcuate anteriorly with anterior angles flat- 
tened and roundly produced, very broadly 
sinuate posteriorly to right or acute slightly 
denticulate posterior angles; side margins 
rather wide (at widest point of prothorax, 
width of the flattened margin is c. Vi 
width from outer edge of margin to mid- 
line of pronotum ) , flattened, reflexed, each 
with usual seta at basal angle and 1 before 
middle; disc finely transversely strigulose, 
sparsely and faintly punctulate. Elytra long, 
c. as in wallacei; width elytra/prothorax 
1.42 and 1.34; outer-apical angles spined, 
sutural angles acutely produced or spined 



(individual variation); striae well im- 
pressed, faintly punctulate; 5th and 7th 
intervals elevated near base. Secondary 
sexual characters normal for genus; c^ with 
1, 2 2 setae each side last ventral segment. 
Measurements: length c. 17-22; width c. 
5.8-7.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,412) from Aiura, N-E. N. G., 1900 m, 
July 1962 (R. W. Taylor, #2147), in rain 
forest; additional paratypes as follows. 
N-E. N. G.: 4, Mt. Missim, Wau, Morobe 
Dist., 950-1000, 1500, 1600-2000 m, Dec. 
28, 1961, Aug. 10, Sept. 21-24, 1964 ( Sedla- 
ceks); 1, Eliptamin Vy., 1200-1350 m, Aug. 
16-30, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 
4, Wareo, Finschhafen (L. Wagner, S. 
Australian Mus.); 1, Moife, 15 km NW. of 
Okapa, 2100 m, Oct. 7-14, 1959 (T. C. Maa, 
Bishop Mus.); 2, Okapa, E. Highlands, 
Apr. 20, 1964 ( Hornabrook ) ; 2, 13 km 
SE. Okapa, 1650-1870 m, Aug. 26, 1964 
(Sedlaceks); 2, Morae, Kukukuku [Rge.], 
E. Highlands, 6000 ft. (c. 1850 m). Mar. 1, 
1964 (Hornabrook). West N. G.: 3, Wissel 
Lakes, Arabu Camp, 1800 m, Oct. 7, 1939 
(H. Boschma, Leiden Mus.); 1, Wissel 
Lakes, Enarotadi, 1800-1900 m, Aug. 10, 
1963 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
9 paratype from Enarotadi. 

Notes. This new species seems close to 
wallacei, from which it differs mainly in its 
wider prothoracic margins. The difference 
is striking on comparison of specimens. 
Mainly because the prothoracic margins are 
wider, the present new species has a rela- 
tively narrower head and wider prothorax 
as shown by measurements: in a measured 
6 of wallacei the head is 0.90 width pro- 
thorax and the prothoracic width/length is 
1.40. Also, taylori averages larger than 
wallacei and usually occurs at higher alti- 
tudes. 

Cafascopus rex n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of wallacei group; form as in Figure 
64; broad with very broad prothorax; green, 



110 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



front and elytra bluish green, lower surface 
and appendages brownish black; head 
roughened and closely microreticulate pos- 
teriorly, more shining but slightly strigulose 
anteriorly, pronotum and elytra duller, 
closely slightly transversely microreticulate. 
Head large, but only 0.78 and 0.83 width 
prothorax; depressed across base, with usual 
longitudinal impression each side anteriorly. 
Prothorax transverse-cordate, very wide but 
with relativelv narrow base; width length 
1.76 and 1.67;' base apex 0.90 and 0.89; side 
margins rather broad especially anteriorly 
and with anterior angles flattened and ad- 
vanced, each with posterior and 1 median- 
lateral seta, latter slightly farther forward 
than usual. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 
1.23 and 1.29; outer-apical and sutural 
angles both with short spines; striae well 
impressed, scarcely punctulate; intervals 
convex, slightly punctulate, 7th carinate at 
base, others slightly humped but not cari- 
nate. Secondary sexual characters of S nor- 
mal for genus; 9 unknown. Measurements: 
length c. 20; width 6.7-6.8 mm. 

Types, llolotype i (Bishop Mus.) from 
Mokai Village, Torricelli Mts., N-E. N. G., 
750 m, Dec. 8-15, 1958 (W. W. Brandt); 
and 1 6 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,413) from Kiunga, Fly R., Papua, Sept. 
24-25, 1957 (W. W . Brandt). 

Notes. Within the uallacei group, the 
large size and very broad, cordate pro- 
thorax immediately distinguish this striking 
species. 

Genus PERICALUS Macleay 

Maclcay 1825, Annulosa Javanica, p. 15. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. C^at., Caial)i(la(', I lurpalinac 7, 

p. 1368 (sfc tor synonymy and adtlitional icln- 

ences ) . 
Jcannci 1919, Clolrop. C^arahiciucs dc la Rruion 

Malj^aclic, Part 2, p. 1007 (in text). 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Al)liandlungen 28, p. 373. 

Dia<j,nosis. Similar to Catascopus (labrum 
emarginate, ligula-paraglossae similar, 4(h 
hind-larsal scgineuts scarcely emarginate, 
claws simple, etc. ) but eyes more abruptl\- 
jiroTuinetit; cl\]icus tnmcate; elytra usually 



with geometric color pattern; size usual!) 
smaller. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Pericalus cicindeloides 
Macleay, of Ja\a, etc. 

Generic distribution. Confined to, but 
widely distributed and diverse in, tropical 
Asia and the Malay Archipelago, reaching 
New Guinea and New Britain but not 
Australia. 

Notes. The genus is represented in New 
Guinea by only the following species 
(fii^uratus), and on New Britain by a dif- 
ferent, endemic species (klapperichi Jed- 
Hcka 1953, Ent. Blatter 49, p. 145). 

Pericalus figurafus Chaudoir 

Chandoir 1861, Berliner Ent. Zeitschrift 5, p. 124. 

Description. None required here; the 
form (Fig. 65) and elytral markings make 
this insect unmistakable, in New Guinea; 
length c. 7-8 mm. 

Type. Supposedly from Gelehes, col- 
lected by Wallace; now in Oberthiir Coll., 
Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
( more than 150 specimens ) probabK 
throughout the island at low altitudes, and 
occurring up to 1320 m nc>ar Wau. 

Notes. So far as I know, this insect has 
not been found in Celebes since Wallace's 
time, and it has not been recorded from the 
Moluccas. I think it is possible that the 
type really cam(> from New Guinea and 
that the species is endemic there. It li\es 
on tree trunks and reccMith' fallen logs in 
rain forest. 

Genus COPTODERA Dejean 

Dejean 1825, Species GeTieral (Coleop. 1, p. 273. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carahidae, llarpalinae 7. 

p. 1370 (see for adilitional references, s>non- 

ymy, and list of .species). 
JcaiiiKd 1949, Coleop. Carabiqnes de la Retjion 

\laluache. Part 3, pp. 921. 926. 
jcdiida 19(i3. i:nt. \l)liand]nn,uen 28, p. 341. 
Ecliiuxhild (;liand()ir 1883, Coleopterornni Xovi- 

(atcs 1, p. 21 ( n(>\v s\i)on\in>' ). 
?rri(h()C(>i)t(>(lcia Lonwerens 1958, Trenhia 24, p. 

255. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlingion 



111 



Diag,nosis. See Keij to Genera of Lebiini 
of Neic Guinea. 

Description. Form (Figs. 66-70) broad, 
± depressed; upper surface not pubescent 
(in New Guinean species). Head: eyes 
prominent; 2 setae over each eye; front im- 
pressed each side anteriorly; clypeus with 1 
seta each side; hibrum variable, usually 
rather long, subtruncate or slightly emar- 
ginate at apex, 6-setose; antennae with 3V-2 
segments glabrous; mentum without tooth; 
ligula 2-setose, paraglossae attached to but 
much longer than ligula, broadly rounded, 
without setae at apex but with small setae 
at sides. Prof/jora.v broadly subcordate (ex- 
cept in <!,rossa), with base sometimes lobed, 
usually not; 2 setae each side, at basal angle 
and before middle; disc with usual im- 
pressions. Elytra broad; humeri broadly 
rounded but rather prominent; apices with 
outer-apical angles rounded, sutural angles 
variable; striae entire, not distinctly punc- 
tate; intervals convex but none specially 
elevated; 3rd intervals with 2-4 seta-bearing 
punctures (if 4, near base on outer edge, 
c. Vi from base on outer edge, behind 
middle on inner edge, and near apex usu- 
ally on inner edge), but one or both inter- 
mediate punctures missing in some species. 
Inner icings full. Lower surface: proster- 
num usually with a little sparse pubescence, 
abdomen not pubescent. Legs slender; 4th 
hind-tarsal segments simply emarginate; 5th 
tarsal segments with accessory setae; claws 
with 3 or 4 teeth. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: i front tarsi slightly dilated, with 
3 segments 2-seriately squamulose, and c^ 
middle tarsi with 2 segments squamulose 
in some (not all) species; i middle tibiae 
with 1 or 2 excisions on inner edge near 
apex in most species (see Notes, below); 
2 setae each side apex last ventral segment 
in both sexes. 

Type species. Of Coptodera, C. f estiva 
Dejean, of Cuba; of Ectinocliila, E. tes- 
selata Chaudoir [= aurata (Macleay)], of 
Australia; of Trichocoptodera, T. maculata 
Louwerens, of Celebes. 



Generic distribution. In a broad sense, 
the genus is pan-tropical. (In Jeannel's 
restricted sense, Coptodera proper is con- 
fined to the Americas, and related Old 
World forms are divided into several 
genera. ) In the Asiatic- Australian area, 
species of the genus {sensu lato) are 
numerous from southeastern Asia including 
Japan across the whole Malay Archipelago, 
and a few occur in Australia and New 
Caledonia. For further details see Notes, 
below. 

Notes. Jeannel (1949) divides Cop^of/era 
(sensu lato) and its immediate allies into 
a number of small genera based primarily 
on genitallic characters. It seems to me that 
in this case, as in many others, Jeannel has 
carried generic splitting beyond the limit 
of usefulness. I have not attempted to 
check the genitallic characters, which would 
require dissection of many species from 
many parts of the world. But I can say that, 
if Jeannel's concept of genera were applied 
to the New Guinean species, I would have 
to divide Coptodera into about 5 genera, 
2 or 3 of which would be new. The new 
names would be meaningless except to 
extreme specialists, and the fine splitting 
would hide the broader relationships and 
geographic patterns of the group. By treat- 
ing the diverse New Guinean species as 
members of one genus, I emphasize what 
I think is a fact, that the group is a natural 
one even though the species are diverse, 
and that it has a pan-tropical distribution. 
The most useful taxonomic treatment in 
the end may be to retain Coptodera in a 
broad sense but to divide it into a reason- 
able number of natural subgenera. This 
should, of course, be done on a worldwide 
basis, not in a local faunal work. 

Certain characters do vary remarkably in 
this genus. The larger New Guinean species, 
which are more typical of Coptodera, have 
the base of the prothorax subtruncate, some- 
times slightly oblique toward the sides but 
not lobed. However, in 2 smaller New 
Guinean species {papueUa and wau), the 



112 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



base of the prothorax does have a distinct 
short basal lobe. And in the Australian 
"Ectinochih" tesseluta, the base of the 
prothorax is more strongly lobed. All these 
species have similar, diagnostic mouthparts 
( mentum without tooth, and ligiila and 
paraglossae as described), and the small 
New Giiinean species are transitional in 
other ways: they have wider prothoracic 
margins and look more like Coptodem than 
Ectinochila tesseJata does, and papueUa has 
elytral markings like some more-typical 
Coptodera, liut both papucUa and iiau ap- 
proach Ectinochila in dense dorsal micro- 
sculpture, and uau has Ectinocliila-Wke 
elytral markings. 

The dorsal elytral punctures confirm this 
relationship. The number of punctures 
varies in Coptodera. The full number is 4 
on each 3rd interval, placed c. as noted in 
the preceding Description. This is the ar- 
rangement in the type species of the genus 
(C. f estiva Dejean, of Cuba) and in some 
of the more or less typical New Guinean 
species, e.g., cyanclla and cluta. However, 
^rossa and lincolata have the 3rd intervals 
3-pimctate (puncture at basal % missing), 
and oxijj)tera has the 3rd intei-vals only 2- 
punctate (both median punctures missing, 
leaving only the subbasal and subapical 
ones). But tlie EctiiiocJiila-likv New Guinean 
species (papuclla and wan) and also the 
Australian E. tcssclata have the 3rd intervals 
4-punctate as in typical Coptodera. 

The excisi(ms of the i middle tibiae also 
confirm the relationship of Ectinochila to 
Coptodera. The 6 middle tibiae have a 
single small excision (like that in lochia) 
in inner edge near apex in the Cuban type 
species of Coptodera {f estiva), in most New 
(iuinc^an species of the genus including the 
Ectinoclula-hkc ones, and in the Australian 
E. tesselata. However, 2 mm-EctinocJiila- 
like New Guinean species are different: 
Coptodera ox\iptera has 2 small excisions 
on each i middle tibia (like Aristolehia), 
and C. ornati))ennis has none. 

Most Coptodera ha\(> the dorsal surface 



glabrous, but "Trichocoptodera^ maculata 
Louwerens of Celebes has the pronotum 
sparsely pilose. Coptodera ornatipennis 
Louwerens of the Moluccas seems closely 
related, and a paratype of it (which I owe 
to the generosity of Mr. Louwerens) has a 
few inconspicuous fine hairs still on the 
pronotal disc. Specimens that I assign to 
this species from New Guinea seem to 
lack pronotal pubescence, but the hairs 
may be rulibed off ( in light-trap speci- 
mens ) or be adhering invisibly to the 
pronotal surface (in specimens mounted 
from alcohol). However, although I have 
listed Trichocoptodera as a possible syn- 
onym of Coptodera, it may eventually prove 
worth recognition as a separate genus or 
subgenus, distinguished by i middle tibiae 
without excisions and perhaps by other 
characters. 

The (S species of Coptodera in New- 
Guinea represent 7 stocks with different, 
independent geographic distributions. ( 1 ) 
C. grossa is endemic and without close 
relatives anywhere, so far as I know. (2) C. 
ornatipennis occurs in the Moluccas as well 
as New Guinea, with an apparent relati\ e 
on Celebes. (3) C. cyanelki represents the 
flexuosa group, which ranges from SE. 
Asia to Australia (the Australian species 
being r/?/.sYr^///.s- Chaudoir). (4) C lincolata 
ranges from Celebes to New Guinea and 
New Britain, and an apparently related 
species {mastersi Macleay) is in Australia. 
(5) C. cluta apparently occurs from SE. 
Asia to New Guinea and New Britain, 
and (6) C. oxyptcra, from Celebes to New 
Guinea, New Britain, and New Ireland; 
these species are not representc^d in Aus- 
tralia. And (7) C. papucUa and nan are 
endemic to New Guinea, probably related 
to each other, and less closeK' related to 
"Ectinocliihr aurata of Australia. 

Most ol the common CU)pt()dcr(i in Xcw 
Guinea inhabit tree trunks and recentK' 
lallcn logs in rain lorcst. I low ever, a lew 
species ol the genus elsewhc-re li\e among 
dead leaxcs on the Uronnd. and this max* be 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



113 



the habitat of some of the less eommon 
New Guinean ones. 

Key to Species of Coptodera of New Guinea 

1. Prothora.x not lobed at l)ase; dorsal micro- 
reticulation moderate or partly absent; larger 
( usually 5 mm or more, excepting small 
individuals of lincolata ) ___ 2 

- Prothorax lobed at base; dorsal micro- 
reticulation close, heavily impressed; smaller 
(3.5-4.8 mm) 7 

2. Very large (8.5-9.5 mm); form as in Figure 
66, with very long mandibles and transverse 
prodiorax (p. 113) grossa 

- Smaller; mandibles relatively shorter; pro- 
thorax it subcordate 3 

3. Head and disc of pronotum not microreticu- 
late; each elytron with 2 irregidar, ± trans- 
verse pale blotches ( Fig. 67 ) ; c^ middle 
tibiae without excisions (p. 113) oniatipennis 

- Head and disc of pronotum microreticulate 
( lightly so in oxijptera ) ; c5 middle tibiae 
with excision(s) on inner edge near apex _ . 4 

4. Elytra with sutural angles blunt, narrowly 
rounded; elytra usually (not always) con- 
spicuously spotted or striped with pale 5 

- Elytra with sutural angles acute, often dentic- 
ulate; elytra unmarked or with only a few 
inconspicuous minute pale flecks 6 

5. Each elytron with 3 irregular pale blotches 
sometimes joined to form an irregular longi- 
tudinal stripe (p. 114) cyanella 

- Elytra usually with numerous, more or less 
separate, longitudinal pale lines (Fig. 68) 
but pale pattern somewhat variable, some- 
times almost obliterated (p. 114) ___. lineolata 

6. Very broad; elytral striae less impressed; 
color dark without pale markings; 3rd 
elytral intervals with only 2 ( subbasal and 
subapical) punctures (p. 115) oxijptcra 

- Less Inroad; elytral striae deeply impressed; 
elytra usually with minute pale flecks; 3rd 
intervals 4-punctate (p. 115) cluia 

7. Front of head heavily microreticulate but 
not longitudinally rugulose; elytra irregularly 
2-fasciate with pale (p. 115) papucUa 

- Front of head in part longitudinally rugulose 
as well as microreticulate; elytra with a 
large, common, irregular X-shaped pale area 
(Fig. 70) (p. 116) ivau 

Copfodera grossa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 66; very large; reddish 
black, appendages brown; .shining, elytra 
faintly silky or subiridescent, reticulate 
microsculpture absent or faint on front and 
on disc of pronotum, distinct (but lightly 



impressed) and transverse on elytra. Head 
0.73 and 0.72 width prothorax; mandibles 
exceptionally long, nearly straight; clypeus 
rounded at sides, sinuately emarginate at 
middle; labrum very long, narrowed an- 
teriorly, obtusely emarginate; front almost 
smooth posteriorly, slightly punctate an- 
teriorly, as is clypeus. Vrothorax very wide, 
formed as in Figure 66; width/length 1.93 
and 1.82; base/apex 1.49 and 1.44; base 
not lobed; side margins narrow, each with 
seta almost at basal angle and less than 
Vi from apex (farther forward than usual); 
basal and apical marginal lines entire; disc 
almost without punctation or strigae. Elytra 
wide; width elytra prothorax c. 1.67 and 
1.65; apices slightly obliquely sinuate, outer- 
apical angles rounded, sutural angles blunt 
or subdenticulate; striae well impressed, 
punctulate; intervals convex, finely and 
sparsely punctulate, 3rd with subbasal and 
subapical seta-bearing punctures and 1 in- 
termediate puncture on inner edge behind 
middle. Secondary sexual characters: as of 
genus except i with squamae on front tarsi 
only ( not on middle tarsi ) ; i middle tibiae 
with 1 excision; i copulatory organs as in 
Figure 176. Measurements: length c. 8.5- 
9.5; width 4.0-4.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,414) from Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 
1944 (Darlington). Paratypes from N-E. 
N. G.: is (Bishop Mus.), Wau (Mt. 
Missim), Morobe Dist., 1100 m, July 22, 
1961 (Sedlaceks); 2, Karimui, 1080 m, July 
13, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Wareo, Finschhafen 
(L. Wagner, S. Australian Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The S paratype from 
Wau and the 9 holotype. 

Notes. Although this species scarcely 
looks like a Coptodera, it has the essential 
characters of the genus. It is distinguished 
from other New Guinean species in the 
preceding Key. 

Coptodera ornatipennis Louwerens 

Louwerens 1962, Tijdschrift voor Ent. 105, p. 146, 
fig. 9. 

Description. With characters of genus; 



114 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



form and markings as in Figure 67; head 
and pronotum reddish testaceous or reddish 
piceous, elytra dark with pale marks as 
shown, but marks somewhat variable; 
reticulate microsculpture absent or faint 
on front and on disc of pronotum, present 
(but light) and transverse on elytra. Head 
0.85 and 0.86 \\idth prothorax. ProtJiurax 
wide-subcordate; width length 1.71 and 
1.71; base apex 1.19 and 1.12; base not 
lobed; disc with a little faint sparse punc- 
tulation, not pubescent but margins with a 
few short hairs near anterior angles (see 
following Notes). Elytra: width elytra, 
prothorax 1.61 and 1.62; sutural angles 
blunt; 3rd intervals with subbasal and sub- 
apical seta-bearing punctures but no inter- 
mediate punctures. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: 6 front tarsi \\'ith .3 segments with 
squamae (as usual); 6 middle tarsi with 
paired squamae at apex 1st segment and 
on 2nd segment; 6 middle tibiae not ex- 
cised. Measurements: length c. 5.0-6.5; 
width 2..3-2.9 mm. 

Types. From Amboina, Moluccas; in 
Louwerens Coll. (1 paratype seen). 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m), Aug. 1933 
(Cheesman). N-E. N. G.: 3, Finschhafen, 
Huon Pen., 10 m, Apr. 9-16, 1963 (Sedla- 
cek), in mercurv vapor light trap; 1, Pindiu, 
Huon Pen., 890 m, Apr. 17, 1963 (Sedlacek). 
in mercury vapor light trap. West N. (i.: 
1, "Neth. New Guinea" [probably vie. Hol- 
landia], Nov. 10, 1944 (T. Aarons, Cali- 
fornia Acad. ) . 

Measured sj)ecimens. Ai from Dobodura 
and 9 from Finschhafen. 

Notes. This species occurs in the MoIik*- 
cas (the types) as well as in New (Guinea. 
and it seems closely related to "Tricho- 
coptodera" nuiculata Louwerens of C'elebcs. 
My Moluccan paratype of ornalipennis 
actually shows vestiges ol pronotal pubes- 
cence. I can see no sign of it on the Ne\\ 
Guinean specimens, but the latter are prob- 
ably all either from alcohol or Irom light 
traps. New Guinean specimens do ha\c a 



few inconspicuous short setae on the pro- 
thoracic margins anteriorly, but such setae 
are present in C. oxyptera too, and very 
short ( vestigial? ) stubs of setae are visible 
at 80x in some other species of Coptodera. 
I suspect that this is a ground-living 
rather than arboreal species. 

Copfodera cyanella Bates 

Bates 1869, Ent. Monthly Mag. 6, p. 74. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1370 (see for synon>niy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Lonwerens 1956, Treuliia 23, p. 225 (Moluccas). 

Description. None required here; see 
preceding Key: length ± 6-7 mm. 

Type(s). From New (iuiiiea, collected 
by Wallace (if really from New Guinea, 
presumably collected at Dorey); now in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
throughout New Guinea and on Normanby 
Is.: 181 specimens (including 81 from 
Dobodura and Oro Bay); most from low- 
altitudes but up to 1200 m at Waw. 

Notes. This species ranges west to the 
Moluccas, ("elebes, and Borneo, and east 
to New Britain. It is apparently related to 
C. flcxuosa Schmidt-CToebel, which occurs 
from SE. Asia to the Philippines, Celebes, 
etc., overlapping the range of cyanella. C. 
australis Chaudoir, of eastern Australia, is 
apparently a distinct but related species. 

Coptodera lineolafa Bates 

Rates 1869, Knt. Mdiithly ^lat,^ 6, p. 74. 

Csiki 19.>2, Coleop. (^at., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1371 (see lors\non\ni\ and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Louwerens 1956, Trenhia 23, p. 225 (Moluccas). 

Description. None required lure; see 
preceding Key and Figure 68; length ± .5-6 
iiiin. 

'iypes. I'rom New (Fuinea, "collect(>d in 
numbers | jiresumabK' at Dorey] b\' Mr. 
\\ allace"; [)rcsumed t\'pe now in Oberthiir 
Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurroicc i)i Xcu- Guiwi'd. Common 
l^robabK' throughout N<'w <^uinea and on 
I^iak and Xonnanby Is.: 231 specimens 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



115 



(including 66 from Dobodura and Oro 
Bay); most from low altitudes, but reaching 
1200-1500 m at Wau and 1400 m at Ka- 
rubaka. Swart Valley. 

Notes. C. lineolata ranges from Celebes 
to New Guinea and New Britain, and C. 
mastcrsi Macleay of eastern Australia is 
closely related. 

New Guinean specimens vary in size 
individually (not geographically) from c. 
4.5 to 6.3 mm in length. The pale elytral 
marks vary individually and perhaps also 
geographically, although I cannot now de- 
fine useful subspecies. Individuals from 
Biak Is. have the markings notably reduced, 
but variably so. 

Copfodera eluta Andrewes 

Andrewes 1923, Trans. Ent. Soc. London for 1923, 
p. 30. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1370 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Lonwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 225 (Molnccas). 

1964, Ent. Tidskrift 85, p. 181 (Borneo). 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Aljhandlmmen 28, pp. 342, 349, 
fiH. 103. 

interrupta Chaiidoir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belsinni 
12, p. 194 ( not interrupta Schniidt-Coebel 
1846). 

Description. None needed here; see Key 
to Species of Coptodera of Neic Guinea, 
and following Notes; length ± 6.5 mm. 

Types. Both Chaudoir and Andrewes had 
this insect from several different localities, 
and neither designated a type. Its selection 
should await careful study of specimens 
from all pertinent localities, for the species 
is variable, perhaps polytypic (Jedlicka, 
1963), and often misidentified. 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Twenty-six 
specimens from numerous localities in all 
3 political di\'isions of New Guinea; most 
at low altitudes, but one at 1200-1300 m 
at Wau. 

Notes. This species apparently ranges 
from SE. Asia to the Philippines, New 
Guinea, and New Britain. Most New 
Guinean individuals have the elytra slightly 
flecked with pale, but some are almost 
unmarked. These resemble C. oxyptera in 



dark color and acute sutural angles but 
differ strikingly in narrower form, deep 
elytral striae, 3rd intervals 4-punctate, and 
6 middle tibiae with only 1 subapical 
excision. 

Coptodera oxyptera Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 12, p. 175. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1371 (see for additional references). 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 225 (Moluccas). 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
broad; color black, not marked; prothorax 
usually with a few short fine setae on mar- 
gins near apical angles; elytra with sutural 
angles acute or acutely denticulate but not 
spined; 3rd intervals with only subbasal and 
subapical seta-bearing punctures; S front 
but not middle tarsi squamulose, and S 
middle tibiae each with 2 small excisions on 
inner edge near apex; length c. 5.5-7.0 mm. 

Type. From Celebes (Wallace), now in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
probably throughout New Guinea: 145 
specimens (including 77 from Dobodura); 
most at low altitudes but reaching at least 
1300 m at Wau and 1200 at Rattan Camp, 
Snow Mts. 

Notes. I have not seen specimens from 
Celebes, but Chaudoii's description fits the 
present species, specifying (partly by ref- 
erence to his description of testrastigma) 
pointed-denticulate but not spined elytral 
apices and presence of only subbasal and 
subapical punctures of the 3rd elytral inter- 
vals. For comparison with eluta, see Notes 
under that species, above. C. oxyptera, as 
I identify it, occurs on Celebes, the Moluc- 
eas, New Guinea, New Britain, and New 
Ireland. It is not represented in Australia. 

Coptodera papuella n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 69) c. as in wau (below), 
Coptodera -like but with prothorax lobed 
or subpedunculate at base; dull green, 
margins and much of base and apex of 
prothorax and margins and markings of 



116 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, \o. 1 



elytra testaceous, the elytral markings Ijeiiig surface. The basal lobe of the prothorax 
2 transverse series of longitudinal lines of is intermediate between the usual (lobe- 
varying length on the intervals, appendages less ) condition in Coptodcra and the very 
irregularly testaceous; entire upper surface strong lobe in E. aiirata. In this and in 
with close, heavily impressed, reticulate some other characters (see Notes under 
microsculpture c. isodiametric on head and Coptodcra ) the present new species and the 
disc of pronotum, scarcely transverse even following one ( icau ) connect Coptodcra 
on elytra. Head 0.82 and 0.81 width pro- and Ectinochila and (I think) justify re- 
thorax; mandibles rather short (in genus); ducing Ectinochila to synonymy, 
labrum usually weakly emarginate at apex. Coptodcra papucUa is common on trunks 
Prothorax wide-subcordate; width length and large branches of standing and recently 
1.71 and 1.68; base/apex 1.14 and 1.19; fallen trees in rain forest. 
base lobed, subpedunculate; base and apex 

not margined at middle; disc with usual Copfodero wau n. sp. 

impressions and also impressed each side. Description. With characters of genus 

Elytra wide; width elytra prothorax 1.70 and (except as follows) of preceding species 

and 1.68; apices obliquely sinuate-truncate (papucUa); form as in Figure 70; color c. 

with outer and sutural angles rounded; as in papuclla except pale marks of elytra 

striae impressed, not distinctly punctulate; fused to form a broad X, with anterior 

intervals moderately convex, 3rd 4-punctate arms of X extending (narrowly) to humeri 

as described for genus. Secondary .sexual and posterior arms more or less connected 

characters: S front tarsi very narrowly across suture. Head 0.82 and 0.83 width 

squamulose, middle tarsi not squamulose; £ prothorax; front longitudinally rugose an- 

middle tibiae with 1 small excision or im- teriorly especially at sides, more irregularly 

pression on inner edge near apex; 2 setae rugose posteriorly. Prothorax: width length 

each side last ventral segment in both 1.69 and 1.70; base/'apex 1.26 and 1.19; 

sexes. Measurements: length 3.5-3.9; width disc impressed each side (as in papuclla), 

1.8-2.0 mm. with an area before middle relatively 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. shining and transverscK' microreticulate. 

31,415) and 4 paratypes from Dobodura, Elytra: width cKtra prothorax 1.65 and 

Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington), and 1.67; elytra slighth' humped near base, the 

56 additional paratypes from Oro Bay raised area relatively shining and with 

(near Dobodura), Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 confused microsculpture, and other dark 

(Darlington). areas of elytra slightK more shining than 

Additional material. Forty-five, from nu- pale areas. Measurements: length 4.4—4.8; 

merous localities in all 3 political divisions width 2.0-2.3 mm. 

of New Guinea; most at low altitudes but Types. Holotype £ (Bishop Mus. ) and 

up to 1150 m at Wau. Because the type 12 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., T> pe Xo. 

series is adequate, because I expect to 31,416) from Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. 

distribute paratypes to all museums con- N. G., altitudes from 1200 to 1500 m, dates 

cemed, and because some geographic vari- in jvme, Sept., Dee.. 1961-1962 (Sedlaceks), 

ation (of markings) seems to occur, I have and additional paratxpes as follows. N-E. 

restricted the type series to specinKMis Irom N. (i.: 1, Kaiiiantu, 1250 ni, Jan. 8, 1965 

Dobodura and Oro liay. (Sedlacek); 3, ()kai)a, dattvs in Jan.. lune. 

Measured specimens. The c5 holotype antl Sept., 1961, 1965 ( llornabrook ). West 

1 9 paratype from Dobodura. N. G.: 6, I^uarotadi, Wissel Lakes, 1850- 

Notes. This species resembles the Aus- 1900 in. liil\ 28, 1962 (Sedlacek). 

tralian Ectinochila aurata (Macleay) in Measured specimens. The i holotype and 

small size and dull, liea\ily microreticulate 1 ',■ i)aral\pi' bom Wau, 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



117 



Notes. For distinguishing characters and 
place of this species among other New 
Guinean Coptodcro, see Description above. 
Notes under the preceding species (pop- 
tiella ) , and tlie Key to Sj)ecies of Coptodcra 
of New Guinea. 

MINUPHLOEUS n. gen. 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Lehiini 
of New Guinea., Figure 71; and Notes, be- 
lo^^^ 

Descri})tion. Form broad, depressed; 
some very short pubescence present above 
and below, the hairs longer at sides of pro- 
thorax and elytra. Head broad; eyes rather 
small but prominent; 2 setae over each eye; 
cKpeus subtruncate, 1-setose each side; 
labrimi subparallel, rounded at sides an- 
teriorly, notched at middle, 6-setose; an- 
tennae short, reaching not or not much 
beyond base of prothorax, pubescent from 
apex 4th segment; mandibles ordinary; 
mentum strongly toothed; ligula rather nar- 
row, 4-setose; paraglossae attached to ligula 
but longer, rounded, not setose; palpi 
slender. Frothorax wide-subcordate; sides 
of disc widely, irregularly depressed but 
actual margins moderate or narrow, with 
numerous lateral setae; basal marginal line 
entire, apical marginal line weak or inter- 
nipted at middle; disc with middle line 
well impressed, basal transverse impression 
very deep, anterior transverse impression 
almost obsolete. Elytra: humeri prominent 
but rounded, strongly margined; apices 
slightly obliquely sinuate-truncate, with 
outer angles broadly and sutural angles 
narrowly rounded; striae entire; intervals 
not elevated at base, 3rd with c. 4, 5th 
with 1 or 2 (near base), 7th with c. 4 or 
5 apparent special seta-bearing punctures 
variable in position and difficult to identify 
among other punctures. Inner wings full. 
Legs: tarsi sparsely pilose above; 4th hind- 
tarsal segment rather small, weakly emar- 
ginate; 5th segment with accessory setae; 
claws with c. 5 or 6 small teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: S front tarsi very little 



dilated but with 4 segments squamulose, 
the squamules slender, rather numerous, 
not paired; c^ middle tarsi without squamae; 
S middle tibiae with small excision on inner 
edge near apex; 2 setae each side near apex 
last ventral segment in both sexes; i copu- 
latory organs as in Figure 177. 

Type species. Minuphloeus mixttis, be- 
low. 

Generic distribution. That of the single 
known species, below. 

Notes. This insect differs from Minti- 
thodes in form; the labrum is notched (not 
notched in Minuthodes); and the lateral 
pronotal setae are more numerous. It looks 
a little like some Fhilophloeus (an Aus- 
tralian genus unknown in New Guinea), 
but the antennal pubescence is different 
(antennae pubescent from middle of 3rd 
segments in Fhilophloeus, from apex of 4th 
in Minuphloeus); the labrum is different 
(not notched in Fhilophloeus); etc. It 
slightly resembles some Coptodera, but the 
mentum is toothed (not in Coptodcra), and 
the ligula is 4-setose (2-setose in Coptodcra). 
Minuphloeus even resembles some wide, 
depressed Catascopus, but the toothed 
claws, excised i middle tibiae, and other 
characters differentiate it from that genus. 
I am therefore forced to treat the insect as 
a new monotypic genus, exact relationships 
undetermined, occurring ( so far as known ) 
only in a small area in New Guinea. 

The name of the new genus is formed 
by combining the first two syllables of 
Minuthodcs with the last two of Fhilo- 
phloeus. 

Minuphloeus mixtus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 71; black, shining, most 
of upper surface without reticulate micro- 
sculpture but extensively punctate. Head 
0.84 and 0.83 width prothorax; front ir- 
regularly impressed, irregularly punctate, 
with short longitudinal ridge each side in- 
side position of anterior supraocular setae. 
Frothorax: width/length 1.82 and 1.80; 



118 BuUetin Museum of Comparatwc Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



base/apex 1.04 and 1.04; margins with 
numerous strong setae irregularly spaced in 
whole length; dise finely, sparsely, irregu- 
larly punctate. EJijtro: width elytra/pro- 
thorax 1.51 and 1.55; striae moderately im- 
pressed, closely punctate; intervals sHghtly 
con\ex, sparsely punctate. Measurements: 
length c. 7.0-8.5; width c. 3.3-4.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
32 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,417) from Wan (including Mt. Missim, 
Kunai Ck., Mt. Kaindi), Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G., 900, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1500- 
1800, 1600-2000 m, dates in Jan., Feb., 
May, June, July, Aug., Sept., Nov., Dec, 
1961-1964 (Sedlaceks), and additional para- 
types as follows. N-E. N. G.: 1, Moife, 
15 km NW. of Okapa, 2100 m Oct. 11-13, 
1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 8, Okapa, 
dates in Apr., Aug., Oct., 1964, Mar. 1965 
(Hornabrook). West N. G.: 19, Enarotadi, 
Wlssel Lakes, 1800, 1800-1900, 1850-1950 
m, dates from July 19 to Aug. 4, 1962 
( Sedlacek ) . 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from VVau. 

Notes. See Notes under genus. The 
insect looks as if it lived on tree trunks or 
under bark, but its actual habitat is not 
recorded. 

Genus AGONOCH/LA Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1848, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 21, Part 1, 

p. 119. 

1869, Asm. Soc. Eiit. B(.'l,<riuin 12, p. 223. 

Csiki 1932, Colcop. Cat., Caiabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1379 (sec for additional references and list 

of species ) . 
Sloane 1898, Proc. I^inncan Soc. New South Wales 

23, p. 494 (in key to Australian .uencra of 

Lebiini ). 

Diaii,nosis. See Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea. 

Description: characters common lo the 
New Guinean species of the genus (Aus- 
tralian species are more diverse). Form as 
in Figures 72-76; small, broad, ± convex; 
short-pubescent above and below, and part 
or all of upper surface also closely punctate 



or (at least elytra) roughened. Head: eyes 
prominent but not large; 2 setae over each 
eye; clypeus subtruncate, 1-setose each side; 
labrum broadly rounded or subtruncate, 6- 
setose; mentum toothed; ligula with 2 long 
and usually 2 short setae, paraglossae c. 
as long as or slightly longer than and at- 
tached to ligula; palpi, especially penulti- 
mate segments, short. Protliorax variable 
in form (see Figs, cited); base ± arcuate 
at middle but not strongly lobed; lateral 
margins narrow to \\'ide, each with seta at 
base and at (usually) or slightly before 
middle of length; base and apex with lightly 
impressed marginal lines sometimes faint or 
interrupted at middle; disc with moderate 
middle line and transverse impressions. 
Elytra: humeri moderately prominent, 
rounded; apices obliquely sinuate-truncate, 
with outer angles broadh' and sutural angles 
narrowly roimded or blunted; striae entire 
or nearly so but usually lightly impressed, 
not sharply defined; 3rd intervals apparently 
usually 3- or 4-punctate, but dorsal punc- 
tures difficult to identify amid other punc- 
tation and pubescence. Inner icings full. 
Legs slender; 4th tarsal segments weakly 
emarginate; 5th segments with accessory 
setae; claws with c. 4 short teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: i front tarsi slightK' 
dilated, soles formed of many squamae not 
arranged in 2 series ( in all species of which 
S 6 in satisfactory condition are axailable); 
i middle tibiae with small notch or im- 
pression on innc>r edge just before apex 
(except in expa)isa); 2 setae each side last 
ventral segment in both sexes. 

Tyj)c sj)ecies. A. guttata Chaudoir, of 
southern Australia (only spc^cies mentioned 
by Chaudoir in 1848). 

(U'ncric distribution. Many species in 
Australia; 1 Australian species also (intro- 
duced?) in Now Zralaiul; 7 small species 
in New Guinea, chieih in lower nioimtains. 

Notes. The 7 New Guinean species that 
I assign to this genus difler among them- 
seKcs, but they all seem to belong to one 
small group ol (he genus that may be 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 119 



restricted to New Guinea and the adjacent 
tropical part of Australia. Described Aus- 
tralian species of the group probably in- 
clude Ag,o nod lil a ovalis Sloane and intricata 
Sloane ( both described 1923, Proc. Linnean 
Soc. New South Wales 48, p. 39), and I 
have specimens representing one or more 
forms of this group from North Queensland, 
Australia, from rain forest on and near the 
Atherton Tableland. This group of small, 
pubescent species, with notched 6 middle 
tibiae, jnay prove to be worth generic sepa- 
ration from A'j^onochila, but the Australian 
Agonochila need much more study before 
division of the genus is undertaken. 

Most Australian A<ionochila live on tree 
trunks, especially on shaggy-trunked Eii- 
ccihjptus trees. The habitat of the New 
Guinean ones is not recorded but is prob- 
ably in rain forest. 

Key to Species of Agonochila of New Guinea 

1. Elytra with pattern of many pale longitudinal 
dashes in 3 irregular transverse series which 
cover nearly the whole elytra (Fig. 72) 2 

- Elytra differently marked or not marked 3 

2. Prothorax not depressed at sides (p. 119) ____ 
viinuthoides 

- Prothorax depressed at sides (p. 119) . ,. 
duplicata 

3. Prothorax not subcordate; anterior prothoracic 
angles broadly rounded-in 4 

- Prothorax broadly subcordate 6 

4. Elytra dark with single c. regular, common, 
red or testaceous area behind middle (p. 
120 ) gressitti 

- Elytra not marked as described 5 

5. Elytra with markings varying from isolated 
pale flecks to irregular X-pattern ( Figs. 
74, A, B) (p. 120) variabilis 

- Color entirely red, without elytral markings 

( p. 120 ) nifa 

6. Elytra with 2 irregular transverse pale fasciae 
behind middle (Fig. 75) or with markings 
expanded (Fig. 75A); length 5.3-5.7 mm 
(p. 121) cxpansa 

- Elytra with a large common pale area (Fig. 
76) or single broad post-median fascia; 
length 6.0-6.7 mm (p. 121) dorsata 

Agonochila minuthoides n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 72; irregular dark reddish 



brown, elytra with complex pattern of short 
pale lines in 3 irregular transverse series, 
appendages testaceous; most of upper sur- 
face irregularly punctate or roughened but 
surface of head and pronotum shining be- 
tween punctures. Head 0.81 and 0.80 width 
prothorax. Prothorax transverse-quadrate; 
width length 1.57 and 1.53; base/apex 1.28 
and 1.28; side margins very narrow, with no 
flattened areas inside margins. Elytra: 
width elytra/prothorax 1.64 and 1.66. Mea- 
surements: length 4..3-4.8; width 2.2-2.4 
mm. 

Tiipes. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,418) from Didiman Ck., Lae, N-E. N. G., 
Mar. 27, 1955 (E. O. Wilson), in lowland 
rain forest; 1 $ paratype, Busu R., E. of 
Lae, 100 m, Sept. 14, 1955 (Gressitt); and 
1 9 paratype, Sattelberg, Huon Gulf, N-E. 
N. G., 1899 (Biro). 

Measured specimens. The $ holotype and 
9 paratype. 

Notes. The color pattern and very nar- 
row prothoracic margins distinguish this 
species. The 3 known specimens are all 
from a rather small area in northern N-E. 
N. G., but it would be unsafe to assume 
that the species is really so localized. 

The complex color pattern of this small 
lebiine is so like that of some Minuthodes 
and of Coptodcro lineolata as to suggest 
mimetic convergence. 

Agonochila duplicata n, sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 73; irregular dark reddish 
brown, elytra with complex pattern of short 
pale lines in 3 irregular transverse series 
(much as in preceding species, minuthoides); 
appendages testaceous; much of upper sur- 
face irregularly punctate, but surface shin- 
ing between punctures. Head 0.71 width 
prothorax. Prothorax wide; width/length 
1.77; base/apex 1.25; margins broadly de- 
pressed. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 
1.50. Measurements: length c. 4.5; width 
2.2 mm. 

Type. Holotype i (Hungarian National 



120 BuUetin Mitscuiu of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Mus.) from Sattelberg, Huon Gulf, N-E. 
N. G., 1899 (Biro); the type is unique. 

Notes. Although the individual deseribed 
above is colored much like the preceding 
species (miniiflioidcs) and occurs within 
the range of the latter, I think it is distinct. 
The wider prothoracic margins are striking, 
and the greater width they give the pro- 
thorax is reflected in the proportions, the 
head being relatively smaller, the prothorax 
wider, and elytra relatively narrower in 
dupJicata than in minuthoidc.s. 

Agonochila gressitti n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slender; head and prothorax red or 
reddish brown, elytra slightly darker ( often 
nearly black) \\'ith large, common, red or 
testaceous area behind middle varying in 
size and shape but always with relatively 
regular margin (compared with some fol- 
lowing species); appendages testaceous; 
most of upper surface punctate but mod- 
erately shining between punctures. Head 
0.65 and 0.68 width prothorax. Frothorax: 
width length 1.72 and 1.76; base/apex not 
calculated (anterior angles too rounded-in 
for exact measurement of apex); sides 
arcuate through most of length, sometimes 
faintly subangulate at inedian-lateral setae; 
posterior angles obtuse, slightly blunted; 
margins moderate. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.53 and 1.62. Measurements: 
length 4.2-5.5; width 2.1-2.7 mm. 

Types, flolotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
5 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,419) 
all from Swart Vy., Karubaka, N-E. N. G., 
1500-1550 m, dates in Nov. 1958 (Gressitt). 

Addidoiial material. N-E. N. G.: 2, 
Adalbert Mts., Wannma, 800-1000 ni, Oct. 
26, 27, ]958 (Gressitt, 1 specimen bearing 
his number 3222); 1, W'um, l^pper jiniuii 
Vy., 840 m, July 16, 1955 (Gressitt)." 

Measured specimens. The A holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. The lorm plus coloration of this 
species are diagnostic, in New Ciuiiiea. 
The specimens listed under Addilional ma- 
terial are slightly smaller and less sharply 



bicolored than the types but seem to be 
conspecific. 

Agonochila rufa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in va rial) ills (following species); 
entirely rufous, not marked; most of upper 
surface moderately punctate but head and 
pronotum shining between punctures, elytra 
duller; appendages testaceous. Head 0.71 
and 0.69 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width length 1.64 and 1.65; base apex not 
calculated ( anterior angles rounded-in ) ; 
sides faintly angulate at median-lateral 
setae, slightly sinuate before c. right 
(slightly obtuse) basal angles; margins 
rather narrow. Elytra: width elytra pro- 
thorax 1.66 and 1.63. Measurements: length 
c. 4.0-4.5; width 2.1-2.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Bisianumu, E. of Port Moresby, Papua, 500 
m, Sept. 22, 1955 (Gressitt); and paratypes 
as follows. Papua: 2 9 9 (1 in M.C.Z., 
Type No. 31,420), Kokoda-Pitoki, 450 m. 
Mar. 23, 24, 1956 (Gressitt); 1 i , Keparra- 
Sangi, nr. Kokoda, 500 m, ^hlr. 26, 1956 
(Gressitt), "Sago palm." N-E. N. G.: 1. 
Wareo, Finschhafen (L. W'agner, S. Aus- 
tralian Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The 9 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Kokoda-Pitoki. 

Notes. The plain rufous color is diagnostic 
for this species in this genus in New 
Guinea. 

Agonochila variabilis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 74; irregularh- brownish 
black with \arial)le elytral markings pale 
( Figs. 74, A, B ) ; appendages brownish 
testaceous; most oi upper surhice punctate 
but shining between punctures, elytra 
slightK' l(\ss shining. Head 0.70 and 0.71 
width prothorax. Prothorax: width length 
1.62 and 1.67; base aj^ex not ealc-ulated 
(anterior angles rounded-in ); margins mod- 
erate. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.58 
and 1.63. MeasuremcnI.s: length c. 4.0- 
4.5; width 2.1-2.3 mm. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 121 



Types. Holotype S ( Bishop Miis. ) and 
13 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,421 ) all from Wissel Lakes, West N. G., 
with following additional details: holotype 
and 1 9 paratype, Uiapnra, Kamo Vy., 
1530 m, Aug. 11, 15, 1955 (Gressitt); 1 
paratype, Wagete, Tigi L., 1700 m, Aug. 17, 
1955 (Gressitt); 10 paratypes, Enarotadi, 
altitudes from 1750 to 1900 m, dates in 
Aug. 1955 (Gressitt) and July, Aug. 1962 
(Sedlaeek); 1, Moanemani, Kamo V., 1500 
m, Aug. 13, 1962 (Sedlaeek). 

Additional material. Papua: 2, Mafulu, 
4000 ft. ( c. 1230 m ) , Jan. 1934 ( Cheesman ) . 
N-E. N. G.: 24, Wau, Morobe Dist., alti- 
tudes from 1100 to 1450 m, dates in all 
months except Apr., June, Nov., 1961-1963 
(Sedlaeek); 1, Mt. Mis(s)im, Morobe Dist., 
5850 ft. ( c. 1780 m ), Apr. ( Stevens, M.C.Z.). 

Measured specimens. The <5 holotype and 
9 paratype from Urapura. 

Notes. The specimens from Wissel Lakes 
vary surprisingly in elytral pattern (Figs. 
cited). Of the 2 from Mafulu, 1 has mark- 
ings comparable to those of the most heavily 
marked Wissel Lakes individual, and the 
other is even more heavily marked. The 
Wau and Mt. Mis(s)im individuals are 
heavily marked ( Fig. 74B ) but somewhat 
variable. The variation is obviously partly 
individual, but heavy markings are ap- 
parently commoner in eastern than in west- 
ern New Guinea. 



Agonochila expansa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
except as noted below; form (Fig. 75) 
broad, with wide-subcordate prothorax; 
black, elytra with 2 irregular, interrupted 
pale fasciae behind middle, the posterior 
one narrower and more interrupted, the 
fasciae sometimes partly joined and ex- 
tended anteriorly on each elytron (Fig. 75 A); 
appendages irregularly blackish brown; en- 
tire upper surface punctate but moderately 
shining between punctures, and head also 
obliquely-longitudinally rugulose at sides 
between eyes. Head 0.76 and 0.76 width 



prothorax. Prothorax: width/length 1.89 
and 1.80; base/apex 1.18 and 1.18; side 
margins broadly depressed, with median- 
lateral setae before middle of prothoracic 
length. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.52 
and 1.59. Secondary sexual characters as 
for genus except i middle tibiae not ex- 
cised or impressed near apex. Measure- 
ments: length 5..'3-5.7; width 2.5-2.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 ( Bishop Mus. ) from 
Finisterre Rge., Saidor, Kiambavi Village, 
N-E. N. G., Aug. 1-28, 1959 (W. W. 
Brandt), and paratypes as follows. N-E. 
N. G.: 1 S in poor condition (M.C.Z., 
Type No. 31,422), Wau, Morobe Dist., 
1400-1500 m, Dec. 20, 1961 (Sedlaeek); 6, 
Okapa, xMar. 23, Apr. 4, 1964 (Homabrook); 
1 6 (with expanded markings), 11 km S. 
of Mt. Hagen (town), N-E. N. G., 2000- 
2300 m. May 20, 1963 (Sedlaeek). 

Measured specimens. The S paratype 
from Wau and the 9 holotype. 

Notes. In form and markings this species 
looks more like a Coptodera than an Agono- 
chila, but it has the characters of the latter 
genus, as here defined. The middle tibiae 
lack excisions in both 6 6 listed, but this is 
probably a specific ( not generic ) character, 
for the follo\\'ing species (dorsata), which 
seems close in most ways to the present 
one, has the notch present, but weak, 

Agonochila dorsata n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
fonn as in Figure 76; black or irregularly 
reddish black, elytra either with large testa- 
ceous area as figured or the pale area re- 
duced to a single transverse post-median 
fascia; entire upper surface closely punc- 
tate, but ± shining between punctures. 
Head 0.82 and 0.82 width prothorax; front 
especially at sides slightly rugulose as well 
as punctate. Prothorax broadly cordate; 
width length 1.84 and 1.80; base apex 1.13 
and 1.15; sides broadly depressed, with 
median-lateral seta slightly before middle. 
Ehjtra: width elytra/ prothorax 1.58 and 
1.65; sutural angles better defined than 



122 Bulletin Museum of Comparatwe Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



usual, scarcely blunted. Secondonj sexual 
characters as for genus, including 6 middle 
tibiae impressed on inner edge near apex. 
Measurements: length 6.0-6.7; width 2.9- 
3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
11 paratvpes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,423) from Kepilam, N-E. N. G., 2420- 
2540 m, June 21 and 23, 1963 (Sedlacek). 

Additional material N-E. N. G.: 3, 11 
km S. of Mt. Hagen (town), 2000-2300 m. 
May 20, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Edie Ck., 
Morobe Dist., 2000-2100 m, Oct. 5-10, 1963 
(Sedlaceks); 1, Kainantu, 2150 m, Jan. 8, 
1965 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 $ paratype. 

Notes. This is the largest Agonochila in 
New Guinea, and it occurs at relatively 
high altitudes. The form plus markings are 
diagnostic. The testaceous area of the elytra 
varies geographically: it is large (c. as in 
Fig. 76) in the whole type series, but 
reduced to a (broad) transverse fascia 
(Fig. 76A) in all specimens listed under 
Additional material. However, I do not 
wish to make subspecies without seeing 
more material from more localities. 

Genus OXYODONTUS Chaudoir 

C:liaucl()ir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Beljj;iuni 12, p. 239. 

Diagnosis. See Keij to Genera of Lebiini 
of Neic Guinea; note especially form, small 
size, long acute mentum tooth, rounded- 
oblique elytral apices, and plainly 3-punc- 
tate 3rd elytral intervals. 

Descri})tion. Form as in Figure 77; part 
of surface including pronotum and sides of 
elytra very inconspicuously setulose. Head: 
eyes prominent, 2 setae over each eye; 
labrum ± rounded, 6-setose; mentum with 
long, acute tooth; ligula narrow, with 2 
long and 2 shorter setae; paraglossae r. 
long as ligula, attached, wide, without 
setae. Vrothorax with usual 2 setae each 
side. Elytra formed as figured; apices 
rounded-oblique; striae entire, moderately 
impressed; 3rd intervals strongly 3-punctate, 



with punctures c. Vi from base on outer 
edge, and near middle and apex on inner 
edge. Inner icings full. Legs slender; 4th 
tarsal segments small, weakly emarginate; 
5th segments with accessory setae; claws 
with c. 3 teeth. Secondary sexual characters: 
i front tarsi slightly dilated, 3 segments 
with narrow squamae not in 2 regular series; 
c5 middle tibiae with minute but deep 
excision on inner edge just before apex; 6 
with 1, 9 2 setae each side near apex last 
ventral segment. 

Ty})e species. O. tripunctatus Chaudoir 
( below ) . 

Generic distribution. That of the single 
species. 

Notes. The relationships of this incon- 
spicuous genus are not clear. 

Oxyodontus tripunctatus Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 12, p. 239. 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 226 (Moluccas). 

Description. None required here. See 
under genus, of which this is the only known 
species, and see Figure 77; length c. 4-4.5 
mm. 

Types. Two specimens from Celebes, 
collected by \\'allace; type now in Ober- 
thiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Netc Guinea. Common 
probably throughout New Guinea: 78 
specimens (including 53 from Dobodura), 
from localities in all 3 political dixisions of 
New Guinea; chiefK' at low altitudes, but 
to 1300 m at Wixu.' 

Notes. This species has been prc^xiousK 
recorded from Celebes and the Molueeas, 
and I have a series of it (or of a closcK' 
related species) also from Leytc and Lu/on 
in the Philippines. It is not known in New 
Britain or Australia. I think it lives in 
und(>rst()ry foliage in rain forest, but my 
scanl\- field notes are not ch^ar about this. 

Genus MOCHTHERUS Schmidt-Goebel 

Scliniitlt-(;oc])C'l 1846, Fannnia Colcop, i^irniaiiiae, 

p. 76. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carahitlac Harpalinac 7, 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlingion 123 



p. 1382 ( see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species). 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlun.ucn 28, p. 352. 

Dkipiosis. See Key to Genera of Lehiini 
of New Guinea., and note form (Fig. 78), 
unarmed elytral apices, and minutely setu- 
lose pronotal disc. 

Description. Form c. as in Figure 78. 
Head: eyes large; 2 setae over each eye; 
labiiim subtruncate, not emarginate, 6- 
setose; mentum weakly, usually obtusely 
(variably?) toothed; ligula and paraglossae 
subequal, attached, together wide, 4-setose; 
palpi slender. Prothorax cordate, with usual 
2 setae each side. Elytra wide, unarmed; 
apices slightly obliquely sinuate-truncate; 
3rd intei'vals 2-punctate, the punctures on 
inner edge behind middle and near apex. 
Inner wings full. Legs slender; 4th tarsal 
segments small, scarcely emarginate; 5th 
segments with (weak) accessory setae; 
claws each with 2 long and 1 shorter tooth. 
Secondary sexual characters: $ front tarsi 
scarcely dilated, 3 segments with paired 
squamae; i middle tibiae not excised; i 
with 1, 9 2 setae near apex each side last 
ventral segment. 

Type species. M. angiilatiis Schmidt- 
Goebel {= tetraspilotus Macleay) of SE. 
Asia, etc. 

Generic distribution. SE. Asia including 
Japan, and across the Malay Archipelago 
to the Philippines and New Guinea (not 
Australia), with one species recorded (in- 
troduced?) also on Christmas Is. and 
Samoa. 

Notes. A single common species of the 
genus occurs on New Guinea. 

Mochtherus obscurus (Sloane) 

Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, 

p. 183 {?Simtms). 
Andrewes 1927, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) 19, p. 

110. 
immacuJatus Maindron (not Redtenbacher) 1908, 

Nova Guinea 5, p. 299. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form as in Figure 78; 
dull black, surface minutely short-setulose; 
length c. 6-7 mm. 



Type. From Sattelberg, N-E. N. G.; 
should be in Deutsches Entomologisches 
Institut, Berlin-Dahlem (seen by An- 
drewes ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
probably throughout New Guinea ( 130 
specimens, including 79 from Dobodura), 
most at low altitudes, but reaching 1200 
m at Wau ( only 1 specimen at this altitude ) 
and 1530 m on the Salawaket Rge. (2 speci- 
mens). Found also on Normanby Is. (2 
specimens ) and Waigeu Is. ( 1 ) . 

Notes. This species occurs also on New 
Britain (6 specimens including 3 from 
Gazelle Pen.) and New Ireland (3). 

The relationship of the New Guinean 
obscurus to asemus Andrewes (recorded 
from the Moluccas by Louwerens 1956, 
Treubia 23, p. 226) and to other species 
farther west in the Malay Archipelago re- 
mains to be determined. In general the 
"species" seem very closely inter-allied in 
this genus, and some may prove to be 
geographic subspecies. 

This insect lives on and under the bark 
of tree trunks and recently fallen logs in 
rain forest. 

(Genus MOCHTHEROIDES Andrewes) 

Andrewes 1923, Trans. Ent. Soc. London for 1923, 

p. 50. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 352. 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea. 

Description. Form c. as in Figure 79. 
Head: eyes moderate; 2 setae over each 
eye; mandibles moderate; labrum rounded- 
truncate, not (or scarcely) emarginate, 6- 
setose; mentum obtusely prominent at 
middle but scarcely toothed; ligula wide, 
4-setose, with paraglossae not attached (ex- 
cept at base), longer and narrower than 
ligula. Prothorax subcordate, with very 
narrow margins, each with usual 2 setae. 
Ehjtra with apices obliquely sinuate-trun- 
cate, unarmed; striae entire; 3rd intervals 
with 1 seta-bearing puncture on inner edge 
at extreme apex but othei-wise impunctate. 



124 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Legs slender; 4th tarsal segments emar- 
ginate for less than half of length; 5th 
segments with accessory setae; claws each 
with c. 4 very small teeth. Inner icings 
full. Sceonckmj sexual charoeters: 6 front 
tarsi wider than in Moehfhcnts, with 3 seg- 
ments 2-seriately squamulose; c5 middle 
tibiae not excised; i with 1, 9 with 2 
setae near apex each side last ventral seg- 
ment. 

Type species. Masoreiis sericans Schmidt- 
Goebel, of Burma, etc. 

Generic distribution. Known from 
Burma, Singapore, Sumatra, Philip- 
pines, and New Britain; not recorded from 
New Guinea, but may occur there. 

Notes. Mochthcroides superficially re- 
sembles MochtJierus but the two genera are 
probably not related. They differ in mouth- 
parts, punctures of 3rd elytral intervals, 
claw teeth, etc. 

(Mochtheroides niger Jedlicka) 

[t'dlic'ka 1934, Acta Soc. Ent. Prai^ue 31, p. 122. 
'■ 1963, Ent. Abhandlungfii 28, p. 352. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form as in Figure 79; 
black, most of surface (except prosternum) 
not setulose. ProtJwrax with margins very 
narrow. Elytra with 3rd intervals with only 
1 (apical) seta-bearing puncture; length c. 
4.5-4.8 mm. 

Type. From Sibu>'an Is., Philippines; 
in Andrewes Coll., British Mus. (se(Mi). 

Occurrence in Netc Guinea. Not yet 
found, but may occur. 

Notes. Three specimens that T collected 
at Cape Clouccster, New Britain (under 
th(^ bark of a small dead tree) seem in- 
distinguishable from the Philippine type, 
with which I compared them in 194S. This 
distribution suggests that the species will 
be louud in New Guinea too. 

Genus DOUCHOCTIS Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula Cok-op. Bimiainac, 

p. 62. 
Andrewes 1931, Zoo). Mcdedelingcn 14, pp. 62-64 

(key to SuiiKitraii species). 



Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1383 (see for additional references and list 
of species ) . 

Louwerens 1958, Treubia 24. pp. 258, 259 (com- 
ments on some species ) . 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlunsen 28, p. 356. 

Diagnosis. Small Lebiini, rather diverse 
in form; not pubescent; mentum without 
tooth; ligula and paraglossae fused into a 
broadly rounded whole, with usually 2 
principal and several slightly smaller setae; 
each 3rd elytral interval usually \N'ith 2 
minute punctures behind middle, these 
punctures without setae. 

Description. Form variable (Figs. 80- 
85); not pubescent above, with or without 
reticulate microsculptme, latter ( if present) 
c. isodiametric on front, transverse on 
pronotum, more transverse on elytra. Head: 
eyes moderately prominent (abruptly so 
in distorta), with 2 seta-bearing pimctures 
over each eye except anterior puncture 
absent in distorta and reduced in aculeata 
group to a small impressed puncture \\'ith- 
out seta; clypeus c. truncate, 1-setose each 
side; labrum rather long, subtruncate or 
slightly arcuate at apex except slightK 
emarginate in microdera, 6-setose; mentum 
without tooth, at most slighth' arcuatcK 
prominent at middle; ligula and maxillae 
fused, together broadly rounded, \\\ih usu- 
ally 2 principal setae slighth' bc>fore apex 
and additional smaller setae at apex ( setae 
often difficult to distinguish); palpi rath(>r 
short, but apical segments not widened; an- 
tennae moderate, pubescent from 5th seg- 
ments, sometimes a little pubescence on 
apex of 4th. Prolhorax: .setac> at basal 
angles present, median-lateral setae present 
or absent; base not margined at middle, 
apex usualK' with fine marginal line entire; 
discal impressions usually present, some- 
times almost obsolete. Elytra varying in 
form and in pi-esence or absence of apical 
spines; striation entire, varying in depth 
and in pnnctalion; .'^rd inlcrxals nsnall\ w itli 
2 niinutt> punctures without setae placed 
irregularly in posterior half of elytral length 
(see Notes. b(4ow). Inner wings bill. Legs 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 125 



slender; 4th tarsal segments weakly emar- elytra too. The species of this group differ 

ginate; 5th segments with few, weak ac- among themselves in color, elytral micro- 

cessory setae; claws with c. 3 to 5 teeth, sculpture, and form of elytral striae. This 

Secondary sexual characters: 6 front tarsi group is thus far known only from the 

very little dilated, 3 segments with paired eastern half of New Guinea, and the species 

squamae at least near apex; S middle tarsi are partly allopatric: divisa and hiion seem 

without squamae; c^ middle tibiae not ex- not to occur together, and neither do 

cised; S with 1, 9 1 or 2 setae each side castanea and polita. 

last ventral segment. Although the New Guinean Dolichoctis 

Type species. Dolichoctis .striata Schmidt- are rather diverse, they are less so than 

Goebel (below). the Oriental members of the genus. Some 

Generic distribution. Numerous from Oriental groups, including Menartis (a 

SE. Asia across the islands to New Guinea, group of small convex species ) , are not 

a few species reaching New Britain, New represented in New Guinea at all. The 

Ireland, the Solomons, and northern general pattern of distribution of the genus 

Australia. suggests that 3 or 4 stocks have reached 

Notes. The 13 New Guinean species of New Guinea at different times, probably 

Dolichoctis can be arranged in 5 groups. D. all from the direction of tropical Asia, and 

striata and microdera represent separate that 1 or 2 of the older stocks have radiated 

species groups which arc widely distributed moderately on the island, 

outside New Guinea and which have prob- The 2 minute impressed punctures, with- 

ably reached New Guinea comparatively out setae, on each 3rd elytral interval pos- 

recently from the west. D. distorta is unique teriorly are present in most Dolichoctis but 

and forms a group of its own; it may be may be absent in distorta (in which these 

derived from either of the following species punctures, if present, are lost in the general 

groups or from a common ancestor. Six punctation of the intervals) and are dif- 

of the remaining New Guinean species form ficult to see and perhaps sometimes absent 

what I call the aculeafa group, character- in the polita group. These minute punctures 

ized by anterior supraocular seta-bearing are best seen in carefully cleaned speci- 

punctures reduced to small impressed mens under diffused light. Wlien I have 

points without setae, median-lateral pro- been able to see them clearly in the first 1 

notal setae lost, elytra dentate or spined, or 2 specimens of a series, I have credited 

and reticulate microsculpture present on that species wath possessing them, without 

entire upper surface. Excepting dentata, attempting to clean and examine whole 

which is satisfactorily distinct, the species series. 

of this group are very similar to each other Although my field notes do not distin- 
and difficult to define because of occur- guish most species of this genus, I know 
rence of intermediates. They are sympatric that most of them (except rriicrodera) are 
— all 6 species occur at Dobodura — and arboreal, living in understory foHage in 
do not seem to be differentiating geographi- rain forest. They are usually collected by 
cally. This group is represented also out- sweeping or beating. They do not often 
side New Guinea. Finally, 4 species form fly to light, which suggests that they may 
what I am naming the polita group, which be largely diurnal. However, one species, 
is like the aculeata group in form and in distorta, is apparently known only from 
spined elytra, but anterior supraocular seta- light-collected specimens. It may be noc- 
bearing punctures are present, and reticu- turnal and may occupy a habitat that col- 
late microsculpture is absent on head and lectors do not often reach, perhaps tree- 
pronotum and in some cases absent on tops in rain forest. 



126 BitUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol 137, No. 1 



Key to Species of Dolichoctis of New Guinea 

1. EKtia obliquely truncate at apex, not 
spined or denticulate; elytra usually 
spotted 2 

- Elytra spined or acutely denticulate at 
apex; not spotted, except sutural area some- 
times red 3 

2. Prothorax wide and widely margined (p. 

126 ) striata 

- Prothorax narrow, narrowly margined (p. 

127 ) inicrodera 

3. Head distorted, eyes small but abniptly 
prominent, front swollen on each side; 
prothorax semicircular, more than 2X wide 

as long ( p. 127 ) distorta 

- Head normal; prothorax less than 2x wide 

as long _^ 4 

4. Head and pronotum (and elytra) with 
reticulate microsculpture; anterior seta- 
bearing punctures over eyes reduced to 
minute punctures without setae {acidcata 
group ) 5 

- Head and pronotum without reticulate 
microsculpture ( elytra with or without it ) ; 
anterior ( as well as posterior ) seta-bearing 
punctures present over eyes ( polita 
group ) 10 

5. Form broader, more Agomim-MVe (Fig. 
82 ) ; prothorax relatively smaller and nar- 
rower; elytra dentate at apex (p. 128) -._. 
dentata 

- Form more oval or fusiform; prothorax 
usually relatively larger and wider; elytra 
spined at apex 6 

6. Elytral striae very lightly impressed, 7th 
striae reduced to very fine superficial 
lines; elytral spines usually very long (but 
varial)le) (p. 128) .v/j/'/io.sr/ 

- Elytral striae including 7th well impressed; 
elytral spines usually shorter 7 

7. Suture or sutural area red; form usually 
relatively narrow; length 4.6-5.6 mm. (p. 
129) sutundis 

- Suture not red; form variable; size often 
larger - __ _ 8 

8. Sides of prothorax ± strongly sinuate; 
elytral striae moderately impressed (p. 
129) .._^ andcala 

- Sides of prothorax not or only .slightly 
simiale; elytral striae often ilceper 9 

9. i'rothorax wider (width/length 1.78 and 
1.80), with sides more rnuiidcd and wiUi 
wider margins (p. 130) siihrottiiKia 

- Prothorax narrower (width length 1.61 and 
1.69), with sides less rounded and with 
narrower niargins (p. 130) sidxpiddrdtd 

10. Strikingl)- bicolorcd, head and prothorax 
red, elytra black or piceous; often larger 
(5.8-7.4 mm) II 



- Not or at most \aguely bicolored; often 
smaller ( 5.4-6.5 mm ) ._„ 12 

11. Elytra with grooved striae and distinct 
reticulate microsculpture (p. 131) .._. divi.sci 

- Elytra with striae formed by rows of small 
punctures and elytral disc without reticu- 
late microsculpture (p. 131) huon 

12. Elytra with reticulate microsculpture (p. 
131 ) castanea 

- Elytral disc without reticulate microsculp- 
ture (p. 132) polita 

Dolichoctis striata Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-CIoebel 1846, Faunula Coleop. Birmaniae, 
p. 62. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1384 (see for synon\'my and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Louwerens 1958, Treubia 24, p. 258. 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 357. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form broad, with elytra 
unarmed; black or piceous, elytra usually 
with red spots; 2 setae over each eye; pro- 
thorax with 2 setae each side (see Notes, 
below); length c. 4—4.5 mm. 

Ttjpe(s). From Burma, in Prague Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in Netv Guinea. Common 
probably throughout New Guinea: 200 
specimens (by count), including examples 
from Normanbv, Woodlark, Biak, and \Vai- 
geu Is.; most at low altitudes (including 
Dobodura), but a few at 1050, 1100, and 
1200 m at Wau. 

Notes. The recorded range of striata is 
from SE. Asia (including Ceylon and 
Japan) to the Philippines, Ne^ (ruinea. 
and Xorth Queensland, Australia, ;uid I 
have specimens also from New Britain and 
New Ireland. \Miether populations from 
all these places are in hut conspecific is 
a (]uestion for future study. 

Most individuals from New CJuinea are 
either 4-spottcd (each clvtron with a pale 
spot near bas(> and another near apex), 2- 
spottcd (with oiiK the subapical spots), or 
intermediate (with consiiicuons subapical 
and fainter subb;isal spots — note that the 
subbasal elytral spots \ ;ny in distinctness 
more than in si/(0. The siiiule iiidiv idujil 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



127 



seen from Woodlark Is. is the only un- 
spotted one in the New Gninean series. 
However, 4-spotted, 2-spotted, and un- 
spotted individuals are said to occur else- 
where in the species' range (Louwerens 
1958). 

Of the 200 New Guinean individuals, all 
that are in condition to examine have 2 
seta-bearing (or formerly seta-bearing) 
punctures over each eye, and all have both 
a basal and a median-lateral seta (or 
puncture) in each prothoracic margin ex- 
cept that 2 specimens from Nabire, West 
N. G. (Bishop Mus. ), lack the median- 
lateral seta and puncture on one side. 
These specimens have the pronotum slightly 
unsymmetric: angulate on the side with 
median seta, evenly arcuate on the side 
without seta. Numerous other specimens 
from the same locality have the median 
seta and puncture present on both sides. 

This species lives in understory foliage 
in rain forest. 

Dolichoctis microdera Andrewes 

Andrewes 1930, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (10) 6, p. 
665. 

1931, Zoologische Mededelingeii 14, p. 63. 

Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 226 ( Moluccas ) . 

1964, Ent. Tidskrift 85, p. 184 (Borneo). 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form (Fig. 80) rela- 
tively slender, with narrow, narrowly mar- 
gined prothorax; black or piceous, each 
elytron with 2 pale spots; 2 setae over each 
eye; prothorax with basal but not median- 
lateral setae; length c. 4.5-5 mm. 

Type. From Sumatra; in Andrewes 
Coll., British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 6, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 
N-E. N. G.: 1, Nadzab, July 1944 (Dar- 
lington); 1, Torricelli Mts., Siaute, sea 
level, Nov. 9-17, 1958 (W. W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. Comparison (made in 1948) 
shows that New Guinean specimens differ 
slightly from the Sumatran type, but the 



latter is unique. More material from more 
localities is needed to show whether the 
differences are individual or geographic. 
The known range of the species now in- 
cludes Sumatra, Borneo, the Moluccas, 
and New Guinea. 

My New Guinean specimens were (I 
think) taken among dead leaves on wet 
ground, a unique habitat for members of 
this eenus in New Guinea. 

Dolichocfis distorta n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 81; irregularly reddish 
piceous, appendages irregularly brown; 
shining, dorsal reticulate microsculpture 
lacking but most of surface irregularly, 
rather finely punctate. Head 0.64 and 0.65 
width prothorax; eyes abnormally small but 
abruptly prominent, with a channel over 
each eye running diagonally forward; pos- 
terior seta-bearing puncture high above 
each eye, anterior puncture absent; front 
strongly swollen each side of median longi- 
tudinal channel, each swollen area im- 
pressed near middle; sides of head behind 
eyes longitudinally multisulcate. Frothorax 
very wide; width/length 2.13 and 2.18; 
base/apex 1.43 and 1.40 (base measured 
across seta-bearing punctures); sides very 
broadly rounded into base, with posterior 
angles not defined; margins very widely 
depressed, slightly reflexed; posterior-lateral 
setae present, median-lateral setae absent; 
base and apex not margined; disc with 
median line and posterior and anterior trans- 
verse impressions. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.16 and 1.17; outer-apical angles 
distinct, c. right or minutely acute; apices 
each with short spine c. opposite ends 2nd 
intervals; striae impressed, not punctate; 
intervals punctate, 3rd with usual 2 small 
punctures doubtfully distinguishable behind 
middle. Secondary sexual characters as for 
genus; $ with 1, 9 2 setae each side last 
ventral segment. Measurements: length 
5.7-6.5; width 2.5-2.7 mm. 



128 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,424) from Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 
1944 (Darlington); 3 paratypes, Kokoda, 
Papua, Mar. 28-29, 1956 (Gressitt), taken 
in light trap; and 1 paratype, same locality, 
1200 ft., June 1933 (Cheesman). 

Measured specimens. A i paratype from 
Kokoda ( British Mus. ) and the 9 holotype. 

Notes. In spite of its unique modifica- 
tions, this species is clearly a Dulichoctis. 
All known specimens were probably taken 
at light: Gressitt's are so labeled; Miss 
Cheesman's specimen has the scales of 
Lepidoptera stuck to it; and mine was 
taken on a lighted window. 

Dolichocfis acuieafa group 

Dolichoctis aculeata Chaudoir and its 
immediate relatives form a well defined 
group with the following characters in addi- 
tion to characters of the genus: form usu- 
ally suboval or fusiform ( but broad 
AiS,onum-\\Ve in dentata); entire upper sur- 
face microreticulate; posterior seta-bearing 
punctures over eyes present, anterior pimc- 
tures reduced to minute points without 
setae; prothoracic margins with seta-bearing 
punctures at basal angles, without median- 
lateral punctures; elytra with outer-apical 
angles well defined (except in dentata) 
and apices acutely dentate or spined c. 
opposite ends of 1st striae or 2nd intervals; 
last ventral segment with 1 seta each side 
in both sexes. 

Besides aculeata itself (as I identify it), 
the lollowing 4 closely related new species 
occur in New Ciuinea: sj)in()sa, suturalis, 
suhrotiinda^ and subijuadrata. These 5 
species (including (/rj//rY//r/ ) apparenlK iii- 
tergrade to some extent, and their status 
is tliereh)re doubtlul. D. dentata is more 
distinct. The species of this group arc all 
sympatric in New Guinea. 

Although most species ot the acideata 
group are New Guinean, the group is repre- 
sented west at least to ('elebes (by typical 
aculeata), on New Britain, New Ireland, 
and the Solomons, and in North Queens- 



land, Australia. The group is apparenth' 
not represented in the Philippines. 

Dolichocfis dentafo n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of aculeata group; form as in Figure 
82; broad-Ai;o;Hn?!-like with relati\ely small 
prothorax; brownish black, margins and 
legs paler brown, antennae and mouthparts 
testaceous. Head 0.82 and 0.83 width pro- 
thorax. Protliora.x rather small, quadrate- 
subcordate; width length 1.58 and 1.60; 
base apex 1.23 and 1.21; side margins 
moderateK' wide and reflexed. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.71 and 1.73; outer- 
apical angles rounded, apices acutely den- 
tate; striae moderately impressed, impunc- 
tate. Measurements: length 6.5-7.0; width 
2.8-3.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,425) and 21 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
6 additional paratypes from Oro Bav 
(near Dobodura), "Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 
( Darlington). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 1, Sur- 
prise Ck., Nh)robe Dist., Oct. 7 (Stevens, 
M.C.Z.); 1, Simbang, Huon Gulf, 1898 
(Biro); 2, Torricelli Alts., Wantipi Village, 
Nov. 30-Dec. 8, 1958 (W. W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.). West N. G.: 1. Ilollandia, 
Jan. 1945 (Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 1, llijob, 25 
m, Sept. 10, 1956 ( Neth. New Guinea Exp., 
Leiden Mus.); 1, Wasian, \\)gelkop, Sept. 
1939 (Wind, M.C.Z.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotvpe and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. I know no \c'r\' close relati\es of 
this species. It is, ol course, placed in rela- 
tion to others in tlu' iireceding Key lo 
Species. 

Dolichocfis spinosa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and ol (icutcala gioup; black. ai')pendages 
dark brown; niicrosculpturc more transverse 
than usual on pronotum and elytra, latter 
sliuhtK iiidcsceut. Head 0.74 and 0.76 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



129 



width prothorax. Prothurax transverse-cor- 
date; width/length 1.67 and 1.64; base/apex 
1.26 and 1.25; sides depressed but margins 
not well defined. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.61 and 1.72; outer-apical angles 
well defined but obtuse, apices with long 
(but variable) slightly dehiscent spines; 
striae, especially outer ones, very lightly 
impressed. Measurements (types only); 
length c. 6.0-7.5 (including spines); width 
2.6-3.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,426) and 9 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (DarHngton). Ad- 
ditional paratypes as follows, all from 
Papua: 3, Kokoda, 1200 ft., June, Aug., 
Sept. 1933 (Cheesman); 1, Palmer R. at 
Black R., June 7-14, 1936 (Archbold Exp., 
A.M.N.H.). 

Additional material. Eighteen from vari- 
ous localities in all 3 political divisions of 
New Guinea; some at low altitudes, some 
at 1200 (at \\'au), 1300, and 2000 m. 

Measured speeimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. Typical specimens of this new 
species are easily recognized by very light 
elytral striation and very long elytral spines, 
but some individuals listed under Additional 
material have shorter spines and vary 
toward one or another of the following 
species. 

Dolichoctis sufuralis n. sp. 

Deseription. With characters of genus 
and of aeuleata group; form c. as in aculeata 
(following species) but more slender, 
smaller; castaneous with suture or sutural 
area reddish, appendages brownish testa- 
ceous. Head 0.69 and 0.74 width prothorax. 
Prothorax: width length 1.79 and 1.74; 
base/apex 1.40 and 1.39; sides broadly 
rounded anteriorly, slightly sinuate before 
somewhat obtuse, blunted posterior angles; 
margins rather widely depressed especially 
posteriorly. Elytra rather narrow; width 
elytra prothorax 1.44 and 1.52; outer-apical 
angles well defined but obtuse, apices 
with short spines; striae moderately im- 



pressed, not distinctly punctate. Measure- 
ments: length c. 4.6-5.6; width e. 2.0-2.4 
mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,427) and 23 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
6 paratypes from Oro Bay (near Dobodura), 
Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 (Darlington). 

Additional material. Thirty-one (some 
doubtfully identified), from numerous lo- 
calities including all 3 political divisions of 
New Guinea and Normanby Is.; most from 
low altitudes ( usually below 500 m ) but 1 
from Finisterre Rge. at 1200, and 1, Upper 
Jimmi Vy. at 1300 m. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. In the aculeata group of New 
Guinean Dolichoctis, only relatively small, 
slender individuals have reddish sutures. 
This correlation of size, form, and color 
suggests that suturalis is a real species, al- 
though the distinguishing characters are 
slight. 

Dolichoctis aculeata Chaudoir 

Chaucloir 1869, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 12, p. 

251. 
Andrewes 1930, Treubia 7, Supplement, p. 336. 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 226 (Moluccas). 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of aculeata group. Head 0.72 and 0.67 
width prothorax. Prothorax: width/length 
1.80 and 1.75; base/apex 1.30 and 1.42 
( proportions notably variable ) ; sides rather 
broadly depressed. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.50 and 1.49; outer-apical angles 
well defined, almost right ( slightly obtuse ) , 
apices spined; striae moderately impressed. 
Measurements: length c. 5.0-6.5; width c. 
2.2-3.0 mm. 

Types. From Celel>es, collected by 
W^allace; type now in Oberthiir Coll., Paris 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
probably throughout the island: 120 speci- 
mens (including 65 from Dobodura and 
Oro Bay), from all 3 political divisions of 



130 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



New Guinea and Rossel and Woodlark Is.; 
most at low altitudes but reaching 1200 to 
1400 m at some localities. 

Measured specimens. A pair { i 9 ) from 
Dobodura. 

Notes. My identification of this species 
is based on comparison with specimens 
identified by Andre wes in his collection. 

I collected speciinens that I refer to this 
species at Iron Range and Rocky R. in 
the mid-peninsular rain forest of Cape 
York, Australia, in 1958. 

Dolichoctis subrotunda n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of aculeata group; similar to oculeata, 
differing principally in form of prothorax 
(Fig. 83), with broadly rounded sides not 
or scarcely sinuate posteriorly. Head 0.65 
and 0.66 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.78 and 1.80; base/apex 1.42 
and 1.33; sides flattened but not strongly re- 
flexed. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.49 
and 1.49; apical spines moderate; striae mod- 
erately impressed. Measurements (types): 
length c. 5.0-6.5; width c. 2.3-2.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,428) and 26 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
2 additional paratypes from Oro Bay ( near 
Dobodura), Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 (Dar- 
lington ) . 

Additional material. Sixty (some doubt- 
fully identified) from numerous localities 
in all 3 political divisions of New Guinea 
and Normanby and Woodlark Is.; most at 
low altitudes, but recorded above 1000 m 
at several localities including Wau and at 
2500 m in the Chimbu area. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. Individuals assigned to this spe- 
cies vary considerably in si/e, depth of 
elvtral striae, etc. A single specimen from 
Waigeu Is. (Camp Nok, 2500 ft. (c. 770 
m), Apr. 1938, Cheesman) differs from all 
specimens from the mainland of New 
Cuinea in having a poorly defined sub- 
apical red spot on (>ach elytron near suture. 



Doiichocfis subquadrato n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of aculeata group; form similar to 
aculeata except prothorax smaller and sub- 
quadrate (Fig. 84). Head 0.75 and 0.70 
width prothorax. Prothorax: width length 
1.61 and 1.69; base apex 1.36 and 1.44; 
sides usually slightly sinuate near base; 
margins scarcely depressed anteriorly, more 
broadly so posteriorly. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.60 and 1.54; apices with mod- 
erate spines; striae usually deeply impressed 
(deeper than in aculeata); 7th intervals 
slightly elevated at base. Measurements 
(types only): length 5.7-6.7; width 2.5-2.8 
mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,429) and 3 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 2 
additional paratypes from Oro Bay (near 
Dobodura), Dec. 1943-Jan. 1944 (Darling- 
ton); and 4 paratypes from Milne Bay, 
Papua, Dec. 1943 (Darlington). 

Additional material. Four from widely 
scattered localities in New Guinea; and 3, 
Aru Is. ( British Mus. ) . Also several doubt- 
fully identified from Wau. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This species seems clearly distinct 
from the preceding one (subrotunda): the 
proportions of head prothorax and pro- 
thoracic width length reflect the relativeK' 
large, wide prothorax of subrotunda and the 
smaller and narrower one of subquadrata. 
However, aculeata is intermediate. These 
3 species together form a bewildering, vari- 
able complex that includes many individ- 
uals wliieh I cannot ]ilace satislactoriK'. 

Dolichoctis polifa group 

The following four species lorni a group, 
apparently confined to Ni'w Cuinea, char- 
acterized as follows: form c. as in aculeata 
group l)ul more skMider; microsculpture 
absent on head and pronotum, prc\scMit or 
absent on elytra; 2 setae over each eye; 
pronotum with setae* (or inmetures) at basal 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 131 



angles but median-lateral setae absent; 
elytral apices dentate or spined; 1 seta 
each side last ventral segment in both sexes. 

Dolichoctis divisa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of polita group; form as in Figure 85; 
head and prothorax red, elytra black and 
slightly silky, legs dark, antennae pale; 
elytra with transverse microsculpture. Head 
0.63 and 0.67 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.52 and 1.57; base/apex 1.41 
and 1.38; sides slightly sinuate before c. 
right (narrowly rounded) basal angles; 
sides of disc slightly depressed. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.35 and 1.37; outer- 
apical angles c. right, apices with moderate 
spines; striae well impressed, not punctate. 
Measurements: length 6.6-7.4; width 2.6- 
2.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,430) and 1 9 paratype from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington), and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 2, 
Bisianumu, E. of Port Moresby, 500 m, 
Sept. 23, 1955 (Gressitt); 1, Kokoda, 1200 
ft. (366 m), Aug. 1933 (Cheesman); 1, 
Milne Bay, Dec. 1943 (Darlington); 1, 
Brown River, 20 km N. of Port Moresby, 
Apr. 29, 1960 (C. W. O'Brien, Bishop 
Mus.); 1, Popondetta, 60 m, Oct. 18, 1963 
(Shanahan, Bishop Mus.); 4, Mt. Laming- 
ton, 1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m) (C. T. 
McNamara, S. Austrahan Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The pair ( i 9 ) 
from Dobodura. 

Notes. This strikingly bicolored species 
is apparently confined to a small part of 
eastern New Guinea. 

Dolichoctis liuon n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of polita group; head and prothorax 
red, elytra usually darker ( castaneous ) , 
sometimes scarcely darker; legs and anten- 
nae dark; whole upper surface without 
reticulate microsculpture. Head 0.65 and 
0.66 width prothorax. Frothorax: width 
length 1.66 and 1.67; base/apex 1.40 and 



1.41; sides slightly sinuate before slightly 
obtuse (nearly right) basal angles; sides of 
disc slightly depressed. Elytra: width 
elytra /prothorax 1.39 and 1.40; outer-apical 
angles c. right, apices short-spined or 
acutely toothed; striae scarcely impressed, 
formed by rows of small punctures. Mea- 
surements: length 5.8-6.9; width 2.3-2.8 
mm. 

Types. Holotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
6 paratypes from Pindiu, Huon Pen., N-E. 
N. G., 500-600, 750-850, 870-1300 m, Apr. 
19, 20, 21, 21-22, 1963 (Sedlacek). Addi- 
tional paratypes as follows, all from north- 
ern part of N-E. N. G.: 4, Finschhafen, 10, 
80 m, Apr. 12, 16, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Lae, 
10 m. May 12, 1966 (Gressitt); 1, Busu R., 
E. of Lae, 100 m, Sept. 15, 1955 (Gressitt); 
1, Torricelli Mts., Mobitei, 750 m. Mar. 5- 
15, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 
Some paratypes now in M.C.Z. (Type No. 
31,431). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Finschhafen. 

Notes. The dark antennae, punctate 
elytral striae, and absence of elytral micro- 
sculpture clearly distinguish this species 
from divisa (above). These 2 species are 
apparently allopatric, confined to different 
small areas of eastern New Guinea. 

Dolichoctis costonea n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of polita group; reddish castaneous, 
prothorax sometimes slightly paler, append- 
ages reddish brown; elytra with transverse 
reticulate microsculpture. Head 0.66 and 
0.68 width prothorax. Prothorax: width/ 
length 1.62 and 1.63; base/apex 1.32 and 
1.31; sides broadly rounded, not or slightly 
sinuate before usually obtuse basal angles; 
disc slightly depressed at sides. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.33 and 1.45; outer- 
apical angles distinct but obtuse and slightly 
blunted, apices short-spined or acutely 
dentate; striae well impressed, not distinctly 
punctate. Measurements: length 5.4-6.5; 
width 2.1-2.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (M.C.Z., Type No. 



132 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



31.432) and 2 paiatypes from Dobodiira, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratvpes as follows. Papua: 
3, Kokoda, 1200 ft., July, Aug. 1933 
(Cheesman); 1, Kokoda-Pitoki, 450 m. Mar. 
24, 1956 (Gressitt); 2, Mt. Lamington, 1300- 
1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m) (C. T. McNamara, 
S. Australian Mus.); 1, Brown R., May 25, 
1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.). N-E. 
N. G.: 15, Pindiu, Huon Pen., 500-600, 
860, 870-1300 m, Apr. 19-22, 1963 (Sed- 
lacek); 1, Busu R. E. of Lae, 100 m, Sept. 
14, 1955 (Gressitt); 1, Bubia, Markham Vy., 
50 m, Sept. 20, 1955 (Gressitt); 1, Sattel- 
berg, Huon Gulf, 1899 (Biro); 1, Madang 
(Friedrich-Wilh.-hafen), 1901 (Biro). 

MecLsurcd specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This speeies is sympatrie with the 
two preceding ones, but perhaps allopatric 
with the following (polita). 

Dolichoctis polifa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
and of polita group; reddish castaneous, 
prothorax sometimes slightly paler, append- 
ages not or slightly paler; entire upper 
surface without reticulate microsculpture. 
Head 0.66 and 0.66 width prothorax. Vro- 
thorax: width/length 1.64 and 1.78; base/ 
apex 1.38 and 1.36; sides usually not sinuate 
before obtuse, sometimes blunted posterior 
angles; sides of disc moderately depressed. 
Elytra: width elytra/ prothorax 1.33 and 
1.36; outer-apical angles distinct but obtuse 
and slightly blunted; apices short-spined or 
acutely toothed; striae well impressed, im- 
punctate. Measurements: length 5.5-6.5; 
width 2.1-2.6 mm. 

Tijpes. Holotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
33 paratypes (some in M.G.Z., Tvp(> No. 

31.433) from Wan, Morobe Dist, N-E. 
N. G., altitudes from 1050 to 1500 m, dates 
in Jan., Feb., Mar., June, July, Sept., Oct., 
Dec, 1961-1964 (Scdlacek);' and 2 para- 
types, Upp(>r Watut R., 24 km W. oi 
Bulolo, N-E. N. G., 760 m. Mar. 5-6, 1963 
(Scdlacek). 



Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Wau. 

Notes. This may be a geographic form 
(confined to the Morobe area) of Dolicho- 
ctis castanea (aboye), distinguished pri- 
marily by absence of clytral microsculp- 
ture, but I do not care to recognize sub- 
species in this genus until relationships and 
geographic patterns are better understood. 

Genus STRICKLANDIA Macleay 

Macleay 1886, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South 
Wales (2) 1, p. 138. 

Diagnosis. Form ( Fig. 86 ) characteristic, 
large, yery broad, depressed; prothorax 
strongly cordate, with numerous extra lat- 
eral setae anteriorly; elytra yery wide, each 
2-spined. See also Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea. 

Description. Form broad, depressed; 
black, moderately shining; not obyiously 
pubescent but pronotum and sometimes 
other parts of upper surface yery incon- 
spicuously sparsely setulose; reticulate mi- 
crosculpture absent or indistinct on head 
and disc of pronotum ( but pronotal disc 
transyersely rugulose), yisible but meshes 
imperfect and irregular on elytra. Head: 
eyes rather small but prominent; 2 setae 
oyer each eye; front flattened, weakl\- de- 
pressed; clypeus subtruncate \\ ith rounded 
angles, 1-setose each side; labrum long, 
apex subtruncate or slighth broadly emar- 
ginate, 6-setose; mandibles moderately long, 
not strongly arcuate, longitudinalb' striate 
aboye at middle oF length; antennae slender, 
pubescent from middle 4th segments; 
mentum subtruncate in sinus, sli^htK' lobed 
or with short blunt tooth; ligula wide at 
apex, with 2 or 3 large and 2 or more smaller 
setae, and paraglossae attached to and 
slightly longer than ligula, without setae; 
palpi slendei-, apical segments labial palpi 
with longitudinal row of numcMous setae 
ab()\-e. Prothorax cordate; base not lobed 
but irregularly obliciucK rounded to basal 
angles; sides angulate or scalloped at mid- 
dle. r(41exed, with priiuipal setae at basal 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 133 



angles and near middle and several addi- 
tional often smaller setae anteriorly; median 
longitudinal and basal and apical transverse 
areas impressed; base and apex not dis- 
tinctly margined. Elytra very wide, widest 
near base; humeri rounded but very promi- 
nent; outer-apical and sutural angles both 
spined; margins finely serrate and setulose; 
striae entire, punctate; 3rd intervals with 1 
or 2 seta-bearing punctures behind middle. 
Inner winfis full. Lefis slender; 4th seg- 
ments middle and hind tarsi narrow, scarcely 
emarginate; 5th segments with accessory 
setae minute (vestigial?); claws with c. 4 
small teeth, in basal half of claw length. 
Secondary sexual characters: 6 front tarsi 
scarcely dilated but 3 segments with small 
2-seriate squamae; S middle tarsi without 
squamae; i middle tibiae not excised; S 
with 1, ? 2 setae each side last ventral seg- 
ment. 

Type species. Stricklandia pericalloides 
Macleay. 

Generic distribution. New Guinea (2 or 
more species ) ; Moluccas ( 1 species, from 
Batjan Is., Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 
241 ) ; New Britain ( 1 probably unde- 
scribed species); and North Queensland, 
Australia (1 species). The members of this 
genus that I have collected live on tree 
trunks and fallen logs in rain forest. 

Notes. I do not know the relationships or 
geographic origin of this primarily New 
Guinean genus. 

Key to Species of Stricklandia of New Guinea 

1. Prothorax narrower (usually c. 1.5 X wide 
as lonfj; at middle, but sometimes wider), 
with relatively narrow margins (reflexed 
margins often less than V4 as wide as distance 
from midline to lateral trough, but some- 
times wider) (p. 133) pericalloides 

- Prothorax very wide (c. 1.9x wide as long 
at middle), with very wide margins (re- 
flexed margins more than V2 as wide as 
distance from midline to lateral trough) 
(p. 133) hta 

Stricklandia pericalloides Macleay 

Macleay 1886, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South 
Wales (2) 1, p. 139. 



Description. See generic Diagnosis and 
Description. Head 0.79 and 0.78 width 
prothorax. Prothorax: width/length 1.48 
and 1.56; l^ase/apex 1.18 and 1.15; reflexed 
margins relatively narrow. Elytra: width 
elytra/ prothorax 1.55 and 1.54. Measure- 
ments (Dobodura series): length c. 11.5- 
13.5 (including elytral spines); width 4.5- 
5.1 mm. 

Type. From Fly R., Papua; presumably 
in Macleay Mus., Sydney (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
probably throughout New Guinea: 96 
specimens (some doubtfully identified, see 
following Notes), from all 3 political divi- 
sions of the island; most at low altitudes 
but reaching c. 1500 to 2000 m at several 
localities including Wau. 

Measured specimens. A pair { i 9 ) from 
Dobodura, Papua. 

Notes. Some individuals tentatively as- 
signed to pericalloides have prothoracic 
margins relatively wide (but not so wide as 
the following species) and may be specifi- 
cally distinct, but I do not wish to describe 
them at present. Mr. Louwerens may refer 
these individuals to a species he will prob- 
ablv describe from New Britain. 

Stricklandia lata n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 86, extraordinarily wide; 
color and surface as described for genus, 
but elytral microsculpture more transverse 
than in pericalloides. Head 0.64 and 0.68 
width prothorax. Frothorax wide-cordate; 
width length 1.89 and 1.89; base/apex 1.06 
and 0.99; margins very wide {c. V2 wide as 
distance from inner edge of margin to 
middle line), with outer edge irregular. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.29 and 
1.36. Measurements: length c. 15-16; width 
c. 6.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Leiden Mus.) from 
Arabu Camp, Wissel Lakes, West N. G., 
1800 m, 1939 (H. Boschma), and additional 
paratypes from Wissel Lakes as follows: 
Is (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,434), Digitara, 
Oct. 1938 (P. J. Eyma); 1 9 , Wagete, Tigi 



134 Bulletin Museuin of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



L., 1700 m, Aug. 17, 1955 (Gressitt); 3, 
Enarotadi, 1850, 1850-1900, 1850-2050 m, 
dates in July, Aug. 1962 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The c5 holotype and 
9 paratype from Wagete. 

Notes. Distinguished from pericaUoides 
by much wider prothorax and other dif- 
ferences of proportion shown l:)y ratios in 
the Descriptions. 

Genus PEUOCYPAS Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula Coleop. Birnianiae, 
p. 33. 

Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carabiques de la Rejiion 
Malgache, Part 3, p. 991. 

Demetrias Csiki 1932 (in part), Coleop. Cat., 
Carabidae, Haipalinae 7, p. 1386 (see for addi- 
tional references ) . 

Risoplulits Jedlicka 1963 (not Leach), Ent. Abhand- 
lungen 28, p. 401. 

Diagnosis. In New Guinea, the form 
(Fig. 87), small size (under 5 mm), and 
long-lobed 4th tarsal segments are diag- 
nostic. 

Description. None required here. See 
detailed description of following new 
species. 

Type species. P. sutiiraJis Schmidt-Goebel, 
of Burma, etc. 

Generic distribution. Southern and east- 
ern Asia to the Philippines and New 
Guinea ( not Australia ) ; Africa, Mada- 
gascar. 

Notes. Generic distinctions and applica- 
tions of generic names have been confused 
in the group of genera to which this genus 
belongs. In my present use of Teliocijpas 
I am following Jeannel, although I do not 
like his multiplication of higher categories. 

Peliocypas papua n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 87; 
brown, appendages slightly paler; not 
pubescent; rather shining, reticulate micro- 
sculpture lightly impressed and irregular, c. 
isodiametric on head and elytra, slightly 
transverse on disc of pronotum. Head 0.97 
and 0.97 width prothorax (measured at 
middle); eyes moderately prominent; 2 



setae over each eye; front slightly impressed 
at sides between eyes and at sides an- 
teriorly; frontal suture indicated but not 
impressed; clypeus subtruncate, 1 -setose 
each side; labrum transverse, subtruncate 
with rounded angles, 6-setose; mentum \\'ith 
strong triangular tooth; ligula rounded- 
subtruncate, apparently 2-setose, with para- 
glossae of c. same length, apparently at- 
tached, narrowly rounded, without setae. 
Prothorax subquadrate, widest at base, with 
anterior angles rounded; width (at middle)/ 
length 1.15 and 1.24; base apex 1.38 and 
1.47; base and apex subtruncate (base 
slightly sinuate), not margined; side mar- 
gins narrow, broader basally and reflexed 
and running into deep baso-lateral impres- 
sions, each margin with setae at basal angle 



and 



V. 



from apex; disc with usual me 



dian line and transverse impressions and 
lightlytransverselystrigulo.se. Elytra: width 
elytra /prothorax 2.04 and 2.14; humeri 
broadly rounded but not much narrowed; 
apices obliquely sinuate-truncate, outer 
angles rounded, sutural angles blunted; 
striae entire but light, not punctate; 3rd 
intervals with 2 conspicuous dorsal punc- 
tures c. Vi from base and ^4 from apex. 
Inner nings full. Legs slender; 4th seg- 
ments of middle and hind tarsi with long 
lolies; 5th segments with accessory setae; 
claws each with 1 long tooth outside and 
2 smaller teeth inside middle of length. 
Secondary sexual characters: i front tarsi 
with squamae (if present) not clearly dif- 
ferentiated; last ventral segment with apex 
deeply notched in i , entire in 9 ; c^ w ith 
1, 9 2 setae each side apex last ventral 
seguKMit. Measurements: length c. 4.0- 
4.5; width c. 1.8-1.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Hungarian National 
Mus.) and 5 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Tvpe 
No. 31,435) all from Madang ("Friedrich- 
\\'ilh.-hafen"), N-E. N. G., 1901 (Biro). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. This is the (easternmost species of 
a genus or group of genera \'er\' w(41 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 135 



represented in the Orient. In Jedlicka's 
(1963, pp. 401-402) key to the species of 
"R/.wp/n'/us," papiia rnns to conplet 5 but 
fits neither species there named, being 
narrower-headed than tinicolor JedHcka 
and smaller than vimmcri Jedlicka. 



New Britain, New Ireland, the Solomons, 
Fiji, Samoa, and New Caledonia (speci- 
mens seen from all these islands). It lives 
in foliage and may (I think) have been 
carried eastward into the Pacific by man, 
perhaps in thatching material. 



Genus CELAENEPHES Schmidt-Goebel Genus SYNTOMUS Hope 



Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula Coleop. Binnaniae, 

p. 77. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Flarpalinae 

7, p. 1412 (see for synonymy and additional 

references ) . 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 399. 

Diap}osis-. See Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea and Description of following 
species. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Celaenephes parallelus 
Schmidt-Goebel ( below ) . 

Generic distribution. That of the single 
species. 

Notes. I do not know the relationships 
of this monotypic genus. 

Celaenephes parallelus Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula Coleop. Birmaniae, 

p. 77. 
Van Emden 1937, Stettiner Ent. Zeitung 98, p. 35. 
Andrewes 1947, Arkiv for Zool. 38A, No. 20, p. 12. 
Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 225 (Moluccas). 
See additional references under genus. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
as in Figure 88; slender, with elytral apices 
simply rounded-truncate; plain black or 
piceous; mentum not toothed; claws not 
toothed; length c. 6.5-7.5 mm. 

Type(s). From Burma; in Prague Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common 
throughout New Guinea and on Normanby 
Is.: 206 specimens, most at low altitudes 
but a few up to 1550 and 1700 m; found at 
Dobodura and Wau. 

Notes. This easily recognized carabid 
ranges at least from Ceylon, extreme NE. 
India (not peninsular India, according to 
Andrewes), Burma, etc. to the Philip- 
pines and northern Australia, and east to 



Hope 1838, Coleop. Manual 2, p. 64. 

Jeanne! 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part 2, p. 1075. 
Metabletus Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula Coleop. 

Birmaniae, p. 38. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1413 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 420. 

Diafinosis. Known among New Guinean 
Lebiini by small size, form (Fig. 89), 
mentum with emarginate tooth, and tarsal 
claws with 2 or 3 minute inconspicuous 
oblique teeth. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Of Syntomtis, Carabus 
truncatellus Linnaeus, of Europe; of Metab- 
letus, M. obscuroguttatus Schmidt-Goebel, 
of Burma, etc. 

Generic distribution. Temperate and 
tropical Eurasia and across the islands 
to North Queensland, Australia; North 
Ameriea; parts of Africa. 

Notes. Only one, widely distributed 
species of this genus reaches New Guinea. 

Syntomus quadripunctatus (Schmidt-Goebel) 

Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula Coleop. Birmaniae, 
p. 39 {Metabletus). 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1418 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description ( for recognition only ) . With 
characters of genus; form as in Figure 89; 
black; upper surface dull but not pubescent; 
elytra with 3rd intervals 2-punctate; length 
c. 3.5 mm. 

Type(s). From Burma; in Prague Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. G.: 
4, Wau, Morobe Dist., 1250 m, dates in 
Jan., Feb., Sept. 1961, 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, 



136 BiiUetin Museum of Comparative ZooIos,ij, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Mt. Missim (near Wau), 1050 m, Dec. 27, 
1962 (Sedlaceks); 1, Mt. Missim (Stevens, 
M.C.Z.); 1, Finschhafen, Apr. 1944 (E. S. 
Ross, Cal. Acad.). West N. G.: 1, Eramboe, 
80 km ex Merauke, Jan. 29, 1960 (T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. The known range of S. quodri- 
punctotus is from SE. Asia including 
Ceylon, Burma, and Japan across the 
Malay Archipelago to the Philippines, 
New Guinea, and the NE. corner of Aus- 
tralia. Occurrence in AustraUa is based on 
a single teneral 9 that I collected N. of 
Mareeba, North Queensland, Feb. 1958. 

Genus MICROLESTES Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula Coleop. Birmaniae, 

p. 41. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1420 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species). 
Jeanncl 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part 2, p. 1084. 
Mateu 1959, Rev. fran^-aise d'Ent. 26, pp. 135 ff. 

( species of tropical Asia ) . 

1963, Ann. Mus. R. I'Afrique Central, Ser. 

in-8°, No. 121, pp. 1-149 ( niono,ii;raph of 
African species). 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlunsen 28, p. 425. 

Diagnosis. Distinguished among New 
CHiinean Lebiini by small size, form (note 
genae not swollen, prothorax lobed at base ), 
mentum without tooth, and tarsal claws 
toothed (teeth few and minute in curtatus). 

DcscripiUm. None required here. 

Tijpc species. Microlestes inconspicuus 
Schmidt-Goebel, of Burma, etc. 

Generic distribution. Warm-temperate 
and tropical Africa and Evirasia and is- 
lands to Australia; North America; scat- 
tered records elsewhere. 

Notes. Two unr(4ated speci(\s occur in 
New Ciuinea, one with Oriental and the 
other with apparent Australian relation- 
.ships. 

Kky io Spi:c:n:s ok Microlestes ok Nkw Guinea 

1. Hclativcly broad (protlioracic widtli Iciiutli 
1.50); elytra with 2 incomplete pale iastiac; 
length 3.8 mm (p. 136) ..._ cinctu.s 

- Narrower (protlioracic width /]ensj;th 1.18 



and 1.28); dull black, not marked; length 
not over 3.2 mm (p. 136) curtatus 

Microlestes cinctus n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 91; black, 
in part slightly brownish, elytra with 2 in- 
complete transverse fasciae testaceous, ap- 
pendages irregularly brownish, bases of 
femora and of antennae slightly darker; 
rather shining, upper surface with reticulate 
microsculpture of meshes isodiametric on 
head and pronotum, less regular and slightly 
transverse on elytra. Head 0.79 and 0.77 
width prothorax. Prothorax \\'ide-subcor- 
date; width length 1.50 and 1.55; base 
apex 1.12 and 1.14; sides rather narrowly 
margined, each margin with setae at base 
and c. % from apex; usual discal impres- 
sions present but weak. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.67 and 1.56; striae lightly 
impressed, minutely irregular or faintly 
punctulate; intervals sparsely minutely punc- 
tulate, 3rd with 1 seta-bearing puncture, on 
inner edge c. Vi from apex. Legs: claws 
each with c. 4 distinct, oblique teeth. Mea- 
surements: length 3.6-.3.8; width 1.7 mm. 

Ti/pe. Holotype 6 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Feramin, N-E. N. G., 1200-1500 m, Mav 
11-22, 1959 (W. W. Brandt); 1 S para- 
type, Okapa (Okasa), N-E. N. G., July 8, 
1965 (Hornabrook), "pine forest, leaf mold." 

Notes. Of other species known to me, 
this is most like M. atrifasciatus Sloane of 
NE. Australia (base of Cape York Pen. to 
northern New South Wales), but the color 
pattern is different, the ehtra in atrifasciatus 
being testaceous with a dark irregular post- 
median fascia and subapical and sublateral 
dark spots. 

Microlestes curtatus n. sp. 

Description. i'"onn as in Figure 90; 
slender, \\ itli el\ tra niuch shoiter than abdo- 
men; dull brow nish black, apjicMidages dark; 
entire upinr surface \\ith reticulate micro- 
sciilplure irregular (partK' longitudinal) on 
head, slightly transverse on pronotiun and 
(4ylra. Head 0.92 and 0.89 w idlh i-)rothorax. 
Prothorax narrow-subcordatc; width length 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 137 



1.18 and 1.28; base/apex 1.08 and 1.04; 
side margins very narrow, each with setae 
at basal angle and c. V4 from apex; disc 
with median line impressed, transverse im- 
pressions scarcely indicated. Elytra very 
short, narrowed anteriorly; width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.68 and 1.64; striae lightly in- 
dicated, sometimes scarcely visible, irregu- 
lar but not distinctly punctate; 3rd intervals 
with 2 punctures, before middle and c. V-t 
from apex. Legs: claws each with c. 2 
small oblique teeth, easily overlooked. Mea- 
surements: length to apex elytra 2.4-2.6, 
to apex abdomen 2.8-3.2; width 1.0-1.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,436) and 28 paratypes all from central 
plains of Luzon, Philippine Is., Feb.-Sept. 
1945 (Darlington). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. West N. G. : 
2, Dor(e)y (probably collected by Wallace, 
British Mus.; this locality is, of course, 
somewhat doubtful ) . 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from central plains of Luzon. 

Notes. I have based this new species on 
Philippine individuals because of doubt 
about Wallace's locality "Dorey" (see Part 
1 of mv work on New Guinean Carabidae, 
pp. 330-331). 

M. curtatus is similar to exilis Schmidt- 
Goebel but has shorter elytra. This species 
(curtatus) with very short elytra is not 
represented in the Andrewes Collection and 
was evidently not known to Mateu (1959) 
or Jedlicka ( 1963 ) . It is unknown in Aus- 
tralia. 

Genus APRISTUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1846, Enumeration des Carabiques . . . 

Caucase . . ., p. 42. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Haipalinae 7, 

p. 1432 ( see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 
Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part 2, p. 1083. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 427. 

Diagnosis. Very small Lebiini, recogniz- 
able (in New Guinea) by form (Fig. 92); 
surface not pubescent but all or part (at 



least elytra) dull and heavily microreticu- 
late; genae not swollen; mentum with 
entire tooth; claws not toothed. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Apristus suhaeneus Chau- 
doir, of the Caucasus and Mediterranean 
region. 

Generic distribution. \\^arm-temperate 
and tropical Eurasia and the Malay Archi- 
pelago to the Philippines and New 
Guinea (not Australia); part of Africa 
(not Madagascar); North and Central 
America, Cuba. 

Notes. American species of this genus, 
which are the only ones I have collected, 
live on the ground, usvially on sand or 
gravel near water. 

Key to Species of Apristus of New Guinea 

1. Color brownish bronze; entire upper surface 
dull; length 3.0-3.5 mm (p. 137) ^ hiroi 

- Color bluish black; front of head and middle 
of pronotimi relatively shining, elytra dull; 
lengtli 3.5-3.9 mm (p. 137) sedlaccki 

Aprisfus biroi n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 92; brownish bronze, 
including appendages; entire upper surface 
dull, heavily microreticulate. Head 0.90 and 
0.90 width prothorax. Prothorax: width/ 
length 1.28 and 1.30; base/apex 0.91 and 
0.90. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.64 
and 1.70. Measurements: length 3.0-3.5; 
width 1.2-1.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Hungarian National 
Mus.) and 5 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type 
No. 31,437) all from Madang ("Friedrich- 
Wilh.-hafen"), N-E. N. G., 1901 (Biro). 

Measured specimens. The $ holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. Similar to A. louwerensi Andrewes 
of Java, but with elytra more narrowed 
anteriorly and with fainter striae. 

Apristus sedlaceki n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in preceding (biroi) except 
sides of prothorax more rounded anteriorly 
and much more strongly sinuate c. % from 



138 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



base; l)liiish black, appendages dark; front 
of head shining with reticulate microsculp- 
tiire faint and fragmentary, middle of 
pronotal disc ± shining, rest of upper sur- 
face including elytra (except edges of 
suture) microreticulate and dull. Head 0.92 
and 0.91 width prothorax. ProtJiorax: 
width length 1.22 and 1.25; base/apex 0.94 
and 0.91. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.82 and 2.00. Measurements: length 3.5- 
3.9; width 1.5-1.8 mm. 

Tifpcs. Holotvq^e 6 (Bishop Mus.) and 
2 paratypes ( 1 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,438) 
from Tobo-Salembeng, Huon Pen., N-E. 
N. G., Apr. 26, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1 para- 
type, Golden Pines, Bulolo, N-E. N. G., 
600 m, Feb. 19, 1962 (Sedlacek); and 1 
paratvpe, Zengaren, N-E. N. G., 1500 m, 
Apr. 28, 1963 (Sedlacek). 

Measured speeimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Tobo-Salembeng. 

Notes. This may be related to A. 
cuprascens Bates (described from Japan 
and identified from the Philippines by An- 
drewes), but the color of sedlaeeki is 
bluish rather than cupreous, the front is 
more shining than in euprascens, and com- 
parison of specimens shows slight differ- 
ences of form not worth describing in de- 
tail here. 

(Genus PLOCHIONUS Latreille & Dejean) 

Latrcille & Dcjeaii 1824, llistoire KaturcIU- et 

Icono^iaphie Coleop. d'Europe 1, p. 150. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidac, Ilarpalinae 7, 

p. 1451 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

sul)fienera, and list of species). 
Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. Caralii(iu(S, 

Fart 2, p. 10:33. 

Diaij,ru)sis. See Key to Genera of Lehii)u. 
and Description of following species. 

Descriplion. None rccjuired h('rc\ 

Type species. Caral)u.s pcdlens l^'abricius 
( below ) . 

Generic distribution. Native in tropical 
and subtropical Aiiirrica, with th(> follow- 
ing species now c. cosmoiMjIilaii. 

Notes. A supposed ciKleiiiic PlocJiiinius 
in New Caledonia needs confirmation. 



{Piochionus pollens (Fabricius)) 

Faliricius 1775, Systenia Ent., p. 244 (Carahns). 
Britton 1948, Proc. Hawaiian Ent. Soc. 13, p. 237 

( Hawaii). 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Alihandlungen 28, p. 450. 
See also references under trenus. 

Description ( for recognition only ). Fonu 
as in Figm-e 93; brown; not pubescent; $ 
front and middle tarsi slighth' dilated, 2- 
seriately squamulose; S middle tibiae 
arcuate, lower edges broadly shallowly 
emarginate below near middle of length; 
length c. 7-9.5 mm. 

Type. From Europe ("Habitat Dres- 
dae"), now presumed lost (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. Not yet 
found, but likely to occiu". 

Notes. This species, probably originally 
from America, has been carried b\' luan 
to most of the warmer parts of the world. 
In the Asiatic-Pacific region it is known 
from SE. Asia, Sumatra, Java, New Brit- 
ain, New Ireland, New Hebrides, Fiji, and 
Polynesia including Hawaii. 

Genus PARENA Motschulsky 

Motschulsky 1859, etude Eut. 8, p. 31. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1453 ( see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 
Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carahiciues de la Rejj;ion 

Malyache, Part 3, pp. 948, 971. 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. AMiandlunsien 28, p. 439. 

Diaii,nosis. See Key to Genera of Lehiini 
of New Guinea and Figm-e 94; note form 
stout, sm-face not pubescent, 4th tarsal seg- 
mcMits long-lobed; length c. 8-10 mm. 

Dcscri))lio)i. None required here. 

Ty))c six'cies. Paroui hicolor Motschulsky, 
ol Java. 

Generic dislrihution. Most species in 
area from SK. Asia (including Japan) to 
northern Australia, fewer in Africa and 
Madagascar. 

Notes. Tile ') species that ha\-e been 
found in New (Guinea represent 3 indepen- 
dent, w idel\ distributed stocks, f'urther 
stn(l\- is needed to clarify their geographic 
Nariation and noinciulatui-e; in\' ]')r(\s(>nt 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 139 



material is inadequate. I shall therefore 
treat the species only briefly. 

All members of this genus that I know 
are winged and arboreal. 

Key to Species of Parena of New Guinea 

1. Color entirely testaceous (with sometimes 
vague posterior elytral cloud pale brown); 
tarsi and antennae contrastingly black (p. 
139 ) testacea 

- Color partly or wholly darker; tarsi and 
antennae reddish testaceous 2 

2. Color testaceous or reddish testaceous with 
very liroad, well defined black elytral fascia 
(p.' 139) fasciata 

- Color irregular rufo-piceous, without well 
defined elytral marking (p. 139) picea 

Parena fesfacea (Chaudoir) 

Chaudoir 1872, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 15, p. 178. 
(Crossoglossa). 

Description. None required here; see 
preceding Key, length (in New Guinea) c. 
10 mm. 

Types. From the Deccan, India; now in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. G.: 
4, Wau, Morobe Dist., 1200 m, June 25, 
Oct. 11-18, Nov. 19, Dec. 5-6, 1961 
( Sedlaceks ) . 

Notes. This species is now known from 
India, (China?), Sumatra, Java ("variety" 
cruralis Andrewes), and New Guinea (not 
Australia ) . 

Parena fasciafa (Chaudoir) 

Chaudoir 1872, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 15, p. 179 

( Crossoglossa ) . 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 440, 

443, fig. 154. 
sloanei Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Har- 

palinae 7, p. 1455 (new synonymy). 
plagiata Macleay 1876, Proc. Linnean Soc. New 

South Wales 1, p. 167 (Phlocodromius) (new 

synonymy ) . 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
as in Figure 94; yellow or reddish yellow 
with conspicuous, broad, transverse, black 
elytral fascia; length (in New Guinea) c. 
8-9 mm. 

Types. Of fasciata, from the Moluecas, 
now in Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus.; of 



plagiata, from Yule Is., Hall Sound, Papua, 
in Macleay Mus., Sydney; of sloanei (new 
name), as for plagiata Macleay (none seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: Yule 
Is. (type of plagiata). N-E. N. G.: 1, Lae, 
July 1944 (F. E. Skinner, Purdue U. Coll., 
Bishop Mus.); 1, Busu R. E. of Lae, 100 m, 
Sept. 13, 1955 (Gressitt); 1, Bulolo, 732 m, 
Aug. 18, 1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.), 
in light trap; 1, Finschhafen, Huon Pen., 
180 m, Apr. 16, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1. 
Mumeng, 600 m, Mar. 10, 1962 (Sedlacek). 
West N. G.: 2, Hollandia, 250 ft.. May 4, 
Nov. 3, 1944 (Hoogstraal, M.C.Z.). 

Notes. I have seen specimens that I refer 
to this species from Java, Borneo, the 
Philippines (including Luzon), Celebes, 
the Moluccas, New Britain, and northern 
Australia, as well as New Guinea. 

Parena picea (Macleay) 

Macleay 1871, Trans. Ent. Soc. New South Wales 
2, p. 86 (Phloeodromius). 

Description. None required here; see 
preceding Key; length (in New Guinea) c. 
9-10 mm^. 

Types. One specimen from Gayndah, 
South Queensland, Australia (probably 
now in Macleay Mus., Sydney) is presum- 
ably the actual type (not seen), although 
Macleay mentions also "a few specimens 
from other portions of Queensland." 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. G.: 
1, Wau, Morobe Dist., 1200 m, Feb. 25, 
1963 (Sedlaceks). West N. G.: 1, Nabire, 
S. Geelvink Bay, 10-40 m, Sept. 1-4, 1962 
( Sedlacek ) . 

Notes. I have no specimens from Aus- 
tralia and have identified the New Guinean 
ones from the original description. I also 
tentatively assign to this species single indi- 
viduals from New Britain and Manus Is. 
( Bishop Mus. ) . 

Genus ANCHISTA Nietner 

Nietner 1856, J. Asiatic Soc. Bengal 6, p. 523. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1455 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 
Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 449. 



140 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Diag,nosis. See Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea, and under following 
species. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Lehia hrunnea Wiede- 
mann, of India and Ceylon. 

Generic distribution. Tlie few known 
species are confined to SE. Asia including 
Ceylon and Japan, except that one (below) 
is widely distributed on the Malay Archi- 
pelago and islands of the western Pacific. 

Notes. I know nothing about the habitat 
or habits of members of this genus. 

Anchisfa binofata (Dejean) 

Dejean 1(S25, Species Ceneiai Coleop. 1, p. 252 
(Plucluoiiiis). 
See also references under genus. 

Description { for recognition only ) . Form 
as in Figure 95; brownish piceous, each 
elytron with longitudinal testaceous area 
centered before middle; surface not pubes- 
cent; 5th intervals with conspicuous seta- 
bearing piuicture at base; length c. 8-9 mm. 

Type(s). From the Marianas; now in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Hagita, near Milne Bay, Aug. 10, 1919 
(J. T. Zimmer, Chicago Mus.). 

Notes. This species has now been foimd 
in SE. Asia (India to Japan), the Anda- 
man Is., Sumatra, Java, Borneo, the 
Philippines, Buru, New Guinea, and the 
Marianas. It has probably been dispersed 
partly by man. 

Genus ENDYNOMENA Chaudoir 

Cliaudoir J 872, Ann. Soc. Knt. Bcliiium 15, p. 1S6. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, llarpalinae 7, 

p. 1457 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 
jedlicka 196.3, Ent. Ahliandlungcn 28, p. 308. 

Diuii^nosis. See Kcij to Genera of Jj'hiini 
of New Guinea. 

Descri))lion. None required here. 

Type species. Plochionus })radieri Fair- 
maire (below). 

Generic distribution. SE. Asia including 
Japan, with the following species very 



widely spread over the islands of the 
Pacific presumably carried by man. 

Notes. The habitat and habits of this 
genus too are unknown to me. 

Endynomena pradieri (Fairmaire) 

Fairmaire 1849, Revue and Magazine Zool. 1, pp. 

34, 281. 
See also references under genus. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
as in Figure 96; brown or piceous; surface 
with short pubescence; length c. 8 mm. 

Type. From Tahiti; in Oberthiir Coll., 
Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. N-E. N. G. : 
1, Sepik, Maprik area, 160 m, Aug. 29, 1957 
(Hardy, Bishop Mus.), at light. 

Notes. This insect has been recorded 
from parts of SE. Asia, Sumatra, the Phil- 
ippines, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, New Cale- 
donia, Tahiti, Hawaii, and other remote 
Pacific islands, and I have seen a speci- 
men from New Britain (Bishop Mus.). 

Genus DEMETRIDA White 

White 1846, Voyage Erebus & Tenor, p. 2. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1459 (as subgenus of Xanthophoca) (see 

for additional references). 
Britton 1941, Proc. R. Ent. Soc. London (B) 10. 

p. 188. 
Xanthophoca Chaudoir 1848, Bull. Soc. Nat. 

Moscow 21, Part 1, p. 73. 

Diaiinosis. Among New Guinean Lebiini 
of the same general form (Figs. 97-109) 
and si/e (5..5-12.0 mm), the species of 
Demetrida are distinguished by tarsi pubes- 
cent (si^arsely pilose) above, with 4th seg- 
ment loug-lobed and tarsal claws with sev- 
eral or many long t{>eth; ligula and 
paraglossae joiiucl, rounded-truncate, usu- 
ally 4-setose ( sometimes with 2 additional 
smaller setae); palpi not widely e.xpand(xl; 
and ' middle tibiac> usualK' (not al\\a\s) 
with inner edge in apical '-t or '2 ol length 
with a row of several low tubercles. 

Descriplion ( aiiplieablc to all New 
Guinean species). l'\)rni usualK slender 
(broadest in itnilalrix) , convex; color di- 
verse, brown ()!■ black or metallic', nniloim 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlinaton 141 



or bicolored or tesselated (but pattern not sharply defined, usually subpunctate, but 

geometric and not simply 2-maculate ) ; disc otherwise c. smooth or at most sparsely 

upper surface with short or long pubescence punctulate. Elytra with humeri rounded, 

or not pubescent; reticulate microsculpture margined; outer apical angles rounded or 

variable, rarely present on whole upper angulate or denticulate; actual apices 

surface, often present only on elytra, some- obliquely truncate or sinuate-emarginate or 

times absent; elytral reticulations c. iso- angulate, denticulate, or spined c. opposite 

diametric or slightly transverse when not ends of 2nd intervals or 2nd striae; striae 

otherwise described. Head narrower than entire, usually well impressed, sometimes 

or wider than prothorax; eyes prominent punctulate; intervals flat or moderately 

but varying from species to species; genae convex, 3rd with 1 (in tenuis only) or 2 or 

usually shorter than eyes and oblique, more dorsal, usually seta-bearing punctures, 

rarely angulately prominent; 2 setae over and 5th intervals rarely with similar punc- 

each eye, the posterior often distant from tures; when 3rd intervals 2-punctate, the 

posterior comers of eyes; front impressed punctures often Vi or less from base on outer 

each side anteriorly, often also flattened edge and V-i or less from apex on inner edge 

and/or weakly impressed or subpunctate of intervals, but positions vary; additional 

at middle; mandibles short, strongly curved; punctures (if present) on 3rd intervals 

clypeus 1-setose each side; labrum trans- sometimes smaller and more irregular than 

verse, 6-setose anteriorly, with additional the 2 primary punctures. Inner wings full 

smaller depressed setae at rounded angles; in all New Guinean species (reduced in 

antennae slender, pubescent from ( part of ) some New Zealand and Australian ones ) . 

4th segments, first 3 segments more sparsely Lower surface variable, often sparsely or 

or not pubescent; mentum with entire partly pubescent (least so in imitatrix); 

tooth; ligula and paraglossae equal in prosternal process variable in profile. Legs 

length, united, forming a rounded-truncate slender; tarsi pubescent (sparsely pilose) 

structure with 4 principal setae and some- above; 4th tarsal segments very deeply 

times 2 additional smaller setae; palpi emarginate, with long lobes; 5th segments 

pubescent, not widely expanded. Protliorax with accessory setae; claws each with 3 

cordate or quadrate or trapezoidal, often to 8 long teeth ( not counting apex of claw ) 

(not always) as long or longer than wide, and sometimes additional smaller teeth, the 

sometimes (not usually) wider at base number varying from species to species 

than at middle (but width of prothorax and also varying a little individually, some- 

always measured at widest midpoint in com- times different on the 2 claws of one tarsus, 

puting proportions); side margins varying Secondary sexual characters: S front tarsi 

in width in different species, each margin not or not much dilated but with 3 segments 

with a seta at or before middle and some- narrowly 2-seriately squamulose below ( the 

times also a seta at or near basal angle, squamae sometimes disarranged and not 

and in seticoUis with additional setae an- obviously 2-seriate ) ; 6 middle tarsi without 

teriorly (setae often broken off, but their sexual squamules; either i middle tibiae 

positions marked by characteristic punc- each with a row of 3 to 9 low tubercles on 

tures ) ; disc convex, more so in some species inner edge in outer % or V2 of length, the 

than in others; anterior and posterior mar- tibial edge being thus subsinuate or sub- 

ginal lines absent or incomplete, middle serrate in profile ( Fig. 160 ) ( this condition 

line very coarse and deep (except finer in called tuberculate-serrate), or S middle 

kokoda), but subbasal and subapical trans- tibiae modified in some other way, or S 

verse impressions weak or obsolete; baso- middle tibiae either straight or slightly 

lateral impressions usually present but not bent-in at apex but without tubercles (Fig. 



142 BuUetin Muscuui of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



161) (see Notes below); last ventral seg- 
ment with 2 to 4 apical setae each side in 6 
(possibly only 1 each side in 6 tenuis), 3 
to 8 or more in 9 ( except only 2 each side 
in 9 tenuis), the number in each sex usually 
fairly constant in a species but varying 
somewhat individually and sometimes un- 
symmetric with ( for example ) 2 setae on 
one side and 3 on the other in a c5 , or 5 on 
one side and 6 on the other in a 9 . 

Type species. So far as I know, type 
species have not been strictly designated 
for either Demctrida or Xanthophoea. 
These genera were based on New Zealand 
and Australian forms respectively, and 
type species should be selected during 
work on the New Zealand and Australian 
members of the group. I therefore make 
no designations now. 

Generic distribution. Numerous in Aus- 
tralia and New Guinea, fewer in New 
Zealand, New Caledonia, New Britain, 
and the Moluccas (Amboina, Batjan) (oc- 
currence in New Britain and Moluccas 
based on undescribed material before me ) . 

Notes. As Britton points out, Demetrida 
has priority over Xantho))]i(>ea. The genus 
as a whole is diverse. Perhaps it can be 
usefully divided, but this will require re- 
vision of the many Australian species, which 
seem to bridge the gap between the flight- 
less (ground-living?) Demetrida of New 
Zealand and the winged (arboreal) species 
of New Guinea. 

The New Guinean species of Demetrida 
may all be interrelated but different ones 
differ remarkably in many details. Varia- 
tion of some characters within the genus 
is indicated in the preceding Description, 
and some species groupings are suggested 
in the Key to Sjjecies. llowevt^r, diff entices 
in the 6 middle tibiae, which may distin- 
guish natural species groups, are worth 
describing in more detail. Of the 56 species 
of the genus now recogni/ed Ironi New 
Guinea, l)oth sexes are known ol 47, onK 
the 6 of 4, and onlx' the 9 of 5. In most 
species of whieli the ■ is known, and also 



in at least some Australian and New Zea- 
land species, the i middle tibiae have the 
inner edge tuberculate-serrate ( see Descrip- 
tion, above). The nimiber of tubercles 
varies from c. 3 to 9 in different species 
(with some individual variation too), and 
the tubercles vary in prominence, being 
sometimes poorly developed and difficult 
to see. The tuberculate-serrate 6 middle 
tibiae probably characterize most Demetrida 
throughout the genus' range. However, 
variations from this pattern occur among 
New Guinean species. In D. ni<j,ripennis 
( and perhaps also in prima, of which the i 
is unknown) the c^ middle tibiae have the 
inner edge weakly 2-emarginate. In i 
imitatrix each middle tibia has a long 
tubercle on inner edge separated from the 
apex by an emargination. And the following 
16 species have the i middle tibiae straight 
or slightly bent-in ( slightly bent-out in 
reversa) at apex but not or not distinctly 
tuberculate-serrate: tripuncta, genicula, an- 
gulata, reversa, kiunga, recta, rex, brunnea, 
fumipes, ni<^ricej)s, saidor, divisa, liumcralis. 
viridibasis, mafulu, and sibil. 

Because of the large number of species 
and because many characters are shared by 
related species or convergent in unrelated 
ones, most New Guinean Demctrida can be 
defined only by combinations of characters. 
However, D. imitatrix is unique in fonn 
( relatively broad ) and in form of 6 middle 
tibiae. D. viti^il is uni(iue in abrupt promi- 
nence of eyes. D. kokoda is unifiue in form 
and in fineness ol impressed niiddli' line of 
pronotum. D. seticoUis is unique (among 
the nonpubescent species) in possessing 
extra lateral pronotal setae* anteriorly. And 
D. tenuis is uni{|ue in sculpture of front, in 
having only 1 seta-bearing pvmelure on 3rd 
elytral inter\al, and in ha\ing oiiK 1 apical 
seta on each side in the •" , and only 2 in 
the 9 . Besides these* single species with 
iiiiiciue eharaeters, the lollowing pairs or 
small groups of species share special char- 
acters. Among New Ciuincnm Demetrida, 
oiilx rcltild. riridilxisis. and niafiiln have 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlingion 143 



almost the whole upper surface micro- 
reticulate; only tripuncta and genicuJa have 
the genae stronghj angulately prominent, 
although tenuis and some other species 
ha\e the genae subprominent; only scriato 
and nubicola (of nonpubescent species) 
have special seta-bearing punctures on 5th 
elytral intervals; and only nig,ripennis and 
perhaps prima have the i middle tibiae 
2-sinuate on inner edge. 

Some New Guinean species of Dcmetrida 
are remarkably variable. Great individual 
variation is indicated by differences in 
proportions of the Measured specimens of 
some species. And Mendelian dimorphism 
is suggested in some cases. For example, 
dimorphism or polymorphism of color ap- 
parently occurs in Demetrida diversa (mark- 
ings black or green, legs dark or pale) and 
in mafnhi (markings present or absent), 
and color differences among some other 
species may be Mendelian, and presence or 
absence of certain prothoracic and elytral 
setae may be Mendelian too, as is the case 
among some other Carabidae. (Genetic 
dimorphism of these and other Carabidae 
will be considered in more detail in Part 
IV of my work on the carabid beetles of 
New Guinea.) This situation suggests that 
the explosive evolution of Demetrida in 
New Guinea, discussed below, is correlated 
with great genetic variability of some 
species, as would be expected. Different 
species may still share homologous genes, 
and characters that have become stabilized 
in some species may still be dimorphic or 
polymorphic in other species. 

I think that Demetrida is in fact in the 
very midst of an evolutionary explosion in 
New Guinea. This is suggested by the 
diversity of superficial differences among 
many apparently closely interrelated species 
and by the great variability of some species. 
Apparently one or more ancestors have 
recently invaded an open or incompletely 
occupied habitat in New Guinea — primarily 
the low foliage of rain forest — where other 
predaceous beetles of this size are few. 



This habitat is occupied in other tropical 
regions by Carabidae of the genus Calleida, 
which many of the New Guinean Demetrida 
resemble in size, form, and even color, al- 
though the two genera are well differen- 
tiated taxonomically by differences in 
mouthparts, tarsal pubescence, etc. That 
Demetrida and Calleida are geographically 
complementary is true but an oversimplifi- 
cation. The situation is complicated in 
many ways, for example by the presence 
of many species of Lebia in some other 
tropical regions but few in New Guinea. 

The ecology of Demetrida seems con- 
sistent with a recent independent radiation 
of the New Guinean species. While most 
New Guinean species apparently live in 
fohage in rain forest, most Australian 
species live on shaggy-barked tree trunks 
(especially of Eucalyptus trees) in rela- 
tively open woodland, and the Australian 
tree-trunk forms and the New Guinean 
rain-forest-foliage forms have evidently 
radiated independently. Although this is 
true, it is another oversimplification. A few 
northern Australian species of Demetrida 
do inhabit rain-forest foliage, but they are 
very few, uncommon, and probably ecolog- 
ically unimportant. Perhaps they represent 
the ancestral stock(s) from which the New 
Guinean rain-forest forms have evolved.^ 



^ The following key characterizes 3 species of 
Demetrida from North Queensland, Australia, that 
are or may be members of the New Guinean 
radiation of the genus. D. angulata, described in 
the present paper, is the only species known to be 
common to Australia and New Guinea. The other 
2 Australian species named in the key are distin- 
guished by 1-punctate 3rd intervals from all known 
New Guinean si^ecies except tenuis. 

Key to Certain Australian Demetrida 

1. Elytral apices sinuate-truncate; 3rd intervals 
1-punctate 2 

- Elytral apices obtusely angulate; 3rd intervals 
2-punctate (1 9 , Rocky R. on Cape York; 
New Guinea) angulata (n. sp. ) 

2. Prothorax with posterior-lateral setae (11, 
middle Cape York, Cairns, Kuranda, etc., 

vie. Brisbane, Clarence R. ) 

longicollis Macleay 



144 BiiUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Also, a few Australian Demetrida live in 
long grass, and a few unrelated New 
Guinean species (perhaps pallen.s?) may 
have invaded grassland independently, at 
high altitudes — but this is a guess, based 
on the insects' appearance; the actual habi- 
tats of the New Guinean species in question 
are not recorded. However, these excep- 
tions and doubts do not change the general 
fact: Demetrida has radiated ± indepen- 
dently in the New Guinean rain forest, and 
the radiation may be continuing explosively 
now. The radiation of these beetles parallels 
in some ways the radiation of birds of 
paradise in the same forests. 

The geographic distribution of different 
species of Demetrida in New Guinea is 
not yet very well known, and the ecologic 
distribution of the species within the rain- 
forest-foliage habitat is hardly known at 
all. Some species of the genus are ap- 
parently localized in parts of New Guinea, 
and geographic replacement may occur in 
some cases. But many other species are 
evidently wide-ranging on the island, and 
many species sometimes occur together at 
one locality or in a very limited area. For 
example, I found 8 species at Dobodura, 
at relatively low altitudes. And 19 species 
have been found at or near Wau on the 
Morobe Plateau, at mid-altitudes. The 
genus as a whole ranges in New Guinea 
from sea level to or above timber line but 
is evidently best represented at mid-alti- 
tudes, where it is a]:)parently dominant, 
and where most of the strikingly colored 
species occur. Some species are evidently 
confined to or specialK characteristic of 
either low, middle, or high altitudes, and 
related species may replace each other at 
different altitudes in some cases. 



- Prothorax without posterior-lateral setae 3 
3. Protliorax narrower ( width length 0.84 and 

0.93); front snhearinate (New (liniiea 
only) (/('/II//.V n. sp. ) 

- Prothorax wider (width/length 1.07); front 

not snhearinate (1 9, Cairns) 

_ ferruginca Cha ndoi r 



As to their ecolog\ , the bright color of 
some New Guinean Demetrida and the 
fewness of individuals taken at light sug- 
gest that most species are diurnal. How the 
various species that occur together, for ex- 
ample at Wau, di\ide the niches within 
the rain-forest-toliage habitat can only be 
guessed at now. A few may have become 
nocturnal. Some species certainly live in 
understory vegetation in the rain forest, 
but some may live at mid-levels and some 
77uiy live in the actual tree tops. Different 
species tmiy specialize in narrower habitats, 
or they 7nay specialize in different kinds 
or sizes of prey. But I should repeat that 
this is mainly guesswork. There is an op- 
portunity here for exciting work in the 
field, on the ecologic radiation of a donii- 
nant group of insects that is radiating 
structurally. 

Some New Guinean Demetrida may be 
mimics. Evolution of mimetic relationships 
would, I think, be consistent with the genus 
being now in the midst of an evolutionary 
explosion, with many species geneticalh 
variable, read)' to respond to special selec- 
tion pressures. Demetrida imitatri.x re- 
sembles and may mimic the common New 
Guinean carabid Viola <i,onum violaeeum 
(Ghaudoir), and some other brighth- colored 
Demetrida ma\' mimic other (^arabidae 
(perhaps certain C^olliurini) and other 
Ix'etles. 

An extraordinar\ eircumstanee is that, 
although many species of Demetrida occur 
in New Guinea and although some of them 
are common ( 1 have examined a total of 
about 1250 individuals) all 56 New Ciuinean 
si)ecies seem to be undeseribed! Howe\er, 
this should not be interpretc^d as e\id(Mice 
ol e\()lution within historic tinu-s. Most 
ol the common species occur at mid-alti- 
tudes in the mountains, where not much 
carabid collecting was done until [']\'elyn 
Gheesmans time, in the If).3()'s, and where 
really extensiNC eolleetions of ('arabidae 
have been made only recentK, by Dr. 
Co-(\ssitt. the Se(llae(>ks. and other l^ishop 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 145 



Museum entomologists. Andrewes, during Beetles of New Guinea," Bull. Mus. Comp. 
his work on Oriental Carabidae, did see a Zool. 126, No. 3, pp. 328-330). 
few older specimens of Demctricki from In drawing descriptions in this genus I 
New Guinea, including one or two of the have used "c." (circa, meaning approxi- 
strikingly colored forms, but he refrained mately) even more often than usual, as a 
from describing them; he did not know stratagem for saving space where I do not 
what genus to put them in! So, I think think exact or detailed statements are use- 
failure of earlier authors to describe New ful. I have also sometimes used it as a 
Guinean species of Demctrida was a result warning that variation probably occurs al- 
partly of the inaccessibility of the habitats though my material is too limited to show it. 
of most common species, partly of com- A statement of my procedure in attacking 
mendable caution on the part of taxonomists the particularly difficult problem presented 
including H. E. Andrewes, and probably by the New Guinean Demetrida may be 
partly just of chance. useful to future taxonomists. My method 

Methods. My specific descriptions in has been to alternate between the general 
Demetrida follow a special, slightly modi- and the particular, with first a general 
fied form designed to characterize the sorting of individuals into apparent species 
species adequately without wasting space, and preparation of a very preHminary key. 
Characters covered in the generic Descrip- then drawing of detailed descriptions 
tion are not repeated, but each specific species by species to determine characters 
description begins with a statement that and variation, then preparation of an im- 
the species shares the generic characters. In proved general classification and an im- 
addition to the usual proportions, the ratio proved key, then further checking of details 
of width of base of prothorax width of head and variation, and eventually (by a much 
is given; it is especially useful in distin- longer process than this! ) preparation of a 
guishing some species of Demetrida. The final key and descriptions emphasizing 
headings Inner icings. Lower swface, and characters that have proved significant and 
Leii,s are omitted; these subjects are suf- emphasizing variation, and last of all com- 
ficiently covered in the Description of the pletion of introductory and explanatory ma- 
genus. A special heading Claws is added terial, including the present statement. This 
because number of claw teeth may prove is the general method that taxonomists use 
to be diagnostic of some species. in classifying any unknown animals, but 

Secondary sexual characters, especially the process has been much more complex 

modifications of the S middle tibiae, have in Demetrida than usual. Specific problems 

been examined carefully and used in char- have been numerous and difficult. In some 

acterizing species. The tibiae are best seen cases I cannot be sure from available ma- 

against an illuminated white background, terial whether differences in color, presence 

To see a tibia clearly at the proper angle or absence of setae, or length of elytral 

it is often necessary to straighten a middle spines are specific characters, cases of 

leg, and this can usually be done without Mendelian dimorphism, or other individual 

relaxing the specimen, by pulling the tibia variations. I have had to decide these 

straight with a pin point and putting a cases arbitrarily, and my groupings of 

minute drop of glue on the articulation to species are partly arbitrary. Tlie resulting 

hold the straightened tibia in place. How- classification is at best an approximation, 

ever, I have not examined the 6 copulatory Of course this is true of most classifications, 

organs. This is a task for third-stage taxono- but I am more than usually conscious of 

mists, far beyond what I have time to do the fact in this case, 

now ( see Part I of my "The Carabid The question may be raised, why publish 



146 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



a classification that is only a doubtful ap- 
proximation? The answer is that it presents 
an exciting situation in the only way that it 
can be presented now. Further work on 
Demetrido, including field work (which is 
essential), requires some sort of classifica- 
tion. In this and many other cases where 
a classification is needed, w^e can only 
follow what I think is a basic rule of the 
trade: a taxonomist must do the best he 
can with the available material in the avail- 
able time. Actually, this imperfect treat- 
ment of Dcmetrida may prove to be the 
most important part of my taxonomic work 
on New Guinean Carabidae. 

The following Key to Species of Demetrida 
of New Guinea is complicated and at some 
points difficult to use. This is inevitable in 
the case of an "exploding" group in which 
some species are exceptionally variable and 
others connected by intergrades. The key 
is designed primarily for identification. It 
is partly but not wholly phylogenetic: 
species that are closely grouped in the key 
are likely to be related but are not neces- 
sarily so. A few dimorphic or exceptionally 
variable species are run out at two different 
points in the key, but I have had to limit 
such multiple treatments. A few individuals 
arc therefore unidentifiable by key char- 
acters and have to be placed by comparison 
of specimens. I might be able to construct 
a multiple-tn-atmcnt kc-y that would iden- 
tify every iiidixidual variant of eacli 
Demetrida now known from New Guinea, 
but the key would be impossibly complex 
even lor present use and it would not take 
care of new material, which will surely 
include new variants of many species. The 
key must be used with care and discretion. 
Proportions must be calculated from inea- 
sinements. Much variation must be allowed 
for, more than I have been able to indicate 
in detail. Alternatives must be tried when 
specimens do not key out clearly. The test 
of a key like this is whether it works rea- 
sonably well in practice. First-time users 
will probabK' Hud it \{'r\' difficult. Persons 



who become more familiar with it will, I 
hope, find shortcuts, in part suggested by 
section headings inserted in brackets. 

For comparisons of New Guinean De- 
metrida with Australian species see espe- 
cially Footnote .3 ( p. 143 ) and under D. 
j)rima (p. 150). 

Key to the Species of Demetrida of 
Neav Guinea 
[Pubescent] 

1. Most of upper surface including sides of 
head behind eyes plainly pubescent 2 

- Surface not pubescent or (.scriata and 
nuhicola only) pubescence very sparse, 
fine, scarcely detectable 8 

2. Pubescence short; elytra truncate or sinuate- 
truncate at apex 3 

- Pubescence long, sparse-pilose: elytra usu- 
ally lobed or spined at apex ( scarcely so 

in pallen.s) 6 

3. Posterior-lateral prothoracic setae present, 
at basal angles; smaller, length under 7.5 
nmi (p. 149) aitape 

- Posterior-lateral prothoracic setae absent; 
size larger 4 

4. Eyes more prominent, head nearly as wide 
as prothorax ( width head/prothorax 0.98 
and 0.96); 9 with 3 ( .^probably 2) apical 
ventral setae each side; (length c. 9 mm) 

( p. 149 ) goroka 

- Eyes less prominent, head relatixely nar- 
rower; apical ventral setae more numer- 
ous 5 

5. Color entirely brown; length usualK' more 
than 9 nun (p. 150) priiiui 

- Bicolored, head and prothorax brown, 
elytra nearly black: length usually less 
tliiui 9 mm (p. 151) __ fi/grZ/K'/ui/.v 

(1 b^Ktral apices siiniate-truucate or we;ikl\' 
lobed; color irreguLir p;ile brown (Y>. 
151 ) pallcus 

- Elytral apices spined 7 

7. brown, el\ tra uitli pale speckles (p. 

151 ) tcsscldtd 

- Almost black, el\ tra faintly or not speckled 
(p. b52 ) crcpciii 

[I'UijtKi tiuncdic] 

(S. l']|ytral apices oblicjuc^b' truncate or sinu;ite- 
truucate (Figs. 97, 99) 9 

- Elytral apices ;mgulate, toollied, spined, 
or at le;ist subaugnhitely lobed (Fig. 102) 
c. opposite ends of 2n(l striae or 2nd 
iuter\als 15 

9. TImHI and iisn;ill\ 5tli eblial intcrxals e;ieli 
with se\('r;il st't;i-be;n ing punetuies; upper 
suilaee with ;i little sp;irse, line, scarcely 
(leteetiible jMibescence 10 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



147 



- Third intervals with 1 or 2 and 5th inter- 20. 
vals without seta-bearing punctures; upper 
surface without such pubescence; (color - 
brown) 11 21. 

10. Color entirely brown (p. 153) seriata 

- Bicolored, reddish brown with base of 
elytra black; (see also Description) (p. 
153 ) mibicola 

11. Large (over 10 mm) and prothorax 
strongly narrowed in front and outer 22. 
angles of elytra distinct, only slightly 
blunted (p. 154) magna 

- Either smaller or with prothorax differently 
shaped or with outer elytral angles 
rovmded 12 

12. Prothorax wider than long at middle (by 
measurement); posterior-lateral prothoracic 23. 
setae usually present 13 

- Prothorax longer than wide; posterior- 
lateral prothoracic setae alisent 14 _ 

13. Larger (7-9.8 mm); outer angles of elytra 
distinct although sometimes slightly blunted 24. 
(p. 155) truncata 

- Smaller (5.6-6.3 mm); outer angles of 
elytra bhuited or rounded (p. 155) _^.- minor 

14. Third elytral intervals 2-punctate; apical 
ventral setae 3 each side in i , probably 25. 
more in 9 (p. 156) std)temti.s 

- Third elytral intervals 1-punctate; apical 
ventral setae 1 each side in S , 2 in $ ( p. 
156 ) tenuis 

[Elytra ungulate, toothed, or spined] 

15. Pronotum without posterior-lateral seta- 
bearing punctures 16 

- Pronotum with posterior-lateral seta-bear- 
ing punctures at or near posterior angles --. 57 

16. Color above brown (testaceous to piceous), 
reddish, black, or bicolored black-and- 
paler, but not in any part metallic 17 

- Color above partly or wholly metallic 
blue, blue-black, green, or purple, often 
but not always bicolored 50 

17. Not distinctly bicolored above, usually ± 
uniform lirown, sometimes grading into og 
darker brown or piceous on some parts _ 
of body ( some doubtful species are run 

both ways in the key) 18 £7 

- Sharply bicolored above, partly brown or _ 
reddish, partly (sometimes only broad 
humeral areas) black 39 28. 

18. Genae angulately or roundly prominent; _ 
(3rd intervals of elytra 3-punctate) 19 29. 

- Genae oblique or weakly rounded, not 
prominent 20 

19. Elytral apices obtusely angulate (p. 

157) tripuncta - 

- Elytral apices acutely toothed ( p. 158 ) -^_. 

_._ genicula 



EKtral apices weakly lobed or angulate 
with the angles blunted, obtuse, or right 21 
EKtral apices acutely dentate or spined __ 23 
Prothorax subcordate, wider than head and 
much wider than long ( width/length c. 
1.35); length 5.5-7.1 mm (p. 158) __ latangula 
Prothorax subcjuadrate, usually (not always) 
narrower than head and not or not much 

wider than long; size larger 22 

Prothorax slightly narrower (cf. descrip- 
tions); i middle tibiae slightly bent-in 
at apex; length 7.5-8.9 mm; (Papua) (p. 

159 ) angulata 

Prothorax slightly wider; $ middle tibiae 
slightly bent-out at apex; length 8.5-9.2 

mm; (West N. G. ) (p. 159) reversa 

Median impressed line of pronotum fine; 
(form as Fig. 103, very elongate; length c. 

10-11 mm) (p. 160) kokoda 

Median impressed line of pronotum 

coarse 24 

Prothorax at middle usually wider than or 
equal to width of head, or only slightly 

narrower 25 

Prothorax much narrower ( usually by %o 

or more) than width of head 33 

Prothorax more cordate, usually wider (c. 
% to 'h-i wider than long, with base often 
wider than head) with sides more rounded 
and more evenly rounded anteriorly, and 
with wider margins, and 3rd elytral interval 
with only two dorsal punctures, and color 
entirely brown, and length usually less 

than 7 mm 26 

Either prothorax more quadrate and nar- 
rower (less than Mi wider than long, with 
base usually narrower than head) with 
sides often but not always less evenly 
rounded anteriorly and with narrower 
margins, or 3rd elytral interval with more 
than t\\Q dorsal punctures ( additional ones 
sometimes smaller than the 2 primary 
ones), or color darker (at least partly 

blackish), or size larger 27 

Elytral apices spined (p. 160) moda 

Elytral apices acutely angulate or short- 
toothed (p. 161) suhmoda 

Prothorax with wider margins, ± cordate 28 
Prothorax with narrower margins, quadrate 

or more narrowly cordate 31 

Smaller, length less than 8 mm 29 

Larger, length 8 mm or more 30 

Eyes more prominent; base of pronotum 
less punctate; elytra usually with (some- 
times faint) reticulate microsculpture (p. 

162 ) hollandia 

Eyes less prominent; base of pronotum 
more punctate; elytra without reticulate 
microsculpture (p. 162) toau 



148 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



30. Third elytral interval 2-punctate (p. 163) _ 41. 
similis 

- Third elytral interxal with more than two - 
punctures (p. 164) dupliccita 

31. Smaller, length 6.7-7.6 mm; ± piceous; 42. 
base of prothorax more punctate; 3rd 

elytral interxals with more than two punc- - 

tures (p. 164) suhpunctaia 

- Larger, length 7.7-9.2 mm; browii; base 43. 
of prothorax less punctate; 3rd elytral in- 
tervals 2-punctate 32 _ 

32. Male middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate; 
length 7.7-9.2 mm (p. 165) dohodura 

- Male middle tibiae not tuberculate-serrate; 
length c. 10.8 mm (p. 166) kiiin^a 

[Protliorax much uanoucr than head] 

33. Elytral 3rd intervals 2-punctate, and color 
reddish brown \\ ith legs pale except knees 
.sometimes dark, and length not over 10 
mm 34 

- Elytral 3rd intervals 3-punctate, or ( // 3rd 
interval 2-punctate) color in part darker 
with legs partly or wholly dark, or size 
over 10 mm 36 

34. Most of upper surface distinctly micro- 
reticulate (p. 166) mafidii 

- Microreticulation distinct (if at all) ouK 
on elytra 35 

35. Male middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate; 
sides of prothorax usually more rounded-in 
at apex (p. 167) forma 

- Male middle tibiae bent-in at apex but not 
tuberculate-serrate; sides of prothorax usu- 
ally almost straight anteriorly (p. 167) recta 

36. Very large, length 10.2-11.4 nun, and 
basal angles of prothorax very prominent 
(Fig. 105) (p. 168) L rex 

- Smaller; l:)asa! angles of prothorax usualK 
less promiui'iit -. 37 

37. Legs red or brown, not darker llian disc 
of elytra (p. 169) hitntnca 

- Legs partly or wliolly dark _ 38 

38. Third inter\als of elytra usually 3-pune- 
tate; pronotum witlumt reticnkitc micro- _ 
sculpture (p. 169) .. . fumipcs ^ 

- Third intervals usually 2-punctate; pro- 
notum ( h'glitly ) mierori'ticulate ( [). 170) 
vclata 

[Bieolorcd hut not mclalJic] 52. 

39. Head and pronotum retldisli, cl\ tr;i en- 
tirely dark or with only apices slightly - 
reddish 10 r>:]. 

- Pattern not as described; elytra usually 

(not always) bicolored 42 - 

40. Lh Iral striae very lightly impressed; le.gs 
l)lack (p. 171) ni^ri))e.s 

- Elvtral striae well impressed; legs usually 54. 
paler _ 41 



44. 



45. 



46. 



47. 



48. 



49. 



[A/< 
50. 



El\tra usualK with reticulate microsculp- 

tnre (p. 162) hoUandia 

Elytra without reticulate microsculptiu'e 

(see also couplet 29) (p. 162) wait 

Prothorax wider (c. V-, or more wider than 

long ) 43 

Prothorax narrower ( c. long or longer than 

wide ) 44 

Elytra black with large connnon discal 

area red (p. 171) dorsali.s 

Elytra reddish brown with dark base 
(western N. C;.; for individuals from 
central and eastern N. C. see 'Notes imder 

duplicata, p. 164) (p. 172) hasalis 

Elytral apices angulatc: (color diverse, 

see Description ) (p. 172 ) diversa 

Ehtral apices spined (spines sometimes 

short ) 45 

Eyes abrupt (Fig. 107); (anterior angles 
of protliorax more rounded than usual ) ( p. 

173 ) vigil 

Eyes normal, prominent but less abrupt 46 
Head and pronotum black or piceous, or 

at least darker than elytral disc 47 

Head and pronotum red or brown 48 

Elytra wholly brown, long-spined (p. 

174) nigriceps 

Elytra brown with darker humeri, shorter- 

spined (p. 174) saidor 

Elytra red or brown with base wholly 
black, except suture sometimes red to base; 
le.gs pale, sometimes with dark knees ( p. 

175 ) ilivisa 

EK tra with onl\- liiuntai dark; legs dark or 

l)icolorcd 49 

Dark humeral ari'as wider, usualK in- 
chiding parts of 5th inter\als; lengtli 9..3- 

10.8 mm (p. 175) humeralis 

Dark humeral areas narrower; length 8.3- 
9.4 mm (p. 169) _.. ftimi))cs 

iaUic at least in jiart] 
Broad ( bro;idcst i)i inctrida) : color en- 

tircK bhic-black (p. 176) imitatrix 

More slender; color not ;is described 51 

ilc;id ;in(l prothor;ix red, eKtr;i entirely 
green cxcipt sometimes jiurplisli posteri- 
orK (p. 177) -- I iridipi-nni.\ 

(]()l(ii' I II it as dcsciibcd 52 

Clolor entircK' green, .urecn ;uid black, or 
gi'cen ;uKi purple 53 

i^icolorcd, cKtrii in part icd or brown 54 

Linger (9.2-10.8 mm); cncs more iibrupt; 
eKtra lon.g-spined (p. 177) U'pida 

Smaller (7.0-9.0 mm); eyes less ;ibrupt; 
(Kli.i nsiialK sliorliT-spiiH d (p. 178) ...- 

std)Iepida 
llc;id :in(l j^roiiotum led or blown, not 
I'l.iiiiK nu'lallic- 55 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlingtun 



149 



- Pronotuni and sometimes also head metallic 
green 56 

55. Elytral apices angnlate (p. 172) __._ diversa 

- Elytral apices short-spined (p. 179) 

viridibasis 

56. Elytral apices acutely annulate; most of 
upper surface microreticulate (p. 166) iiiafulii 

- Elytral apices long-spined; only elytra 
(faintly) microreticulate (p. 179) sibil 

{Posterior-lateral setae presciit] 

57. Color hrown-piceous (head and pronotum 
usually darker than elytra); prothoracic 
margins with extra setae anteriorly (p. 
180 ) seticollis 

- Color wholly or mainly black, blue-black, 
or green-black; prothoracic margins with- 
out extra setae anteriorly 58 

58. Legs red testaceous (p. 181) pallipes 

- Legs dark 59 

59. Elytra black with common discal area red 
(p. 181) discoidalis 

- Elytra metallic blue-black or green-black 
without discal red area 60 

60. Elytra short-spined ( p. 182 ) .— sedlacekorum 

- Elytra long-spined (p. 182) hrandti 

Demetr'ida aitape n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genu.s; 
form nearly as in following species {fS,oroka, 
Fig. 97), slender, eyes prominent, elytral 
apices obliquely subtruncate; entirely brown; 
surface short-pubescent, without r(>ticulate 
microsculpture but sparsely punctulate. 
Flead 0.91 and 0.90 width prothorax; eyes 
moderately prominent, genae shorter and 
oblique. PwtJiora.x narrowly subcordate; 
width/length 1.10 and 1.13; base/apex 1.36 
and 1.34; base/head 0.94 and 0.91; sides 
broadly rounded in anterior %, broadly 
sinuate before right or slightly acute some- 
times minutely blunted posterior angles; 
margins rather wide in proportion to width 
of insect, each with seta before middle 
and at or just before basal angle; baso- 
lateral areas slightly depressed and more 
closely punctate than disc. Elytra long; 
width elytra/prothorax 1.69 and 1.61; apices 
slightly obliquely sinuate-truncate, with 
outer angles moderately and sutural angles 
narrowly rounded; striae deep, subpunctate 
(or with sides of intervals slightly irregu- 
lar); 3rd interval with c. 4 special seta- 



bearing punctures (difficult to distinguish 
amid other punctation). Claws with c. 6 
teeth. Secondary sexiial characters: S tarsi 
as genus; i middle tibiae tuberculate-ser- 
rate ( c. 5 small tubercles ) ; 6 with 3 or 4, 
$ 4 or 5 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements (types only): length 5.8- 
7.2; width 1.8-2.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,439) and 3 paratypes from Aitape, N-E. 
N. G., Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 6 para- 
types, Mt. Lamington, Papua (C. T. 
McNamara, S. Australian Mus.). 

Additional jnaterial. Papua: 1, Do- 
bodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). N-E. 
N. G.: 1, Erima, Astrolabe Bay, 1896 (Biro). 
West N. G.: 1, Dojo [near Hollandia], 
Apr. 1958 (G. den Hoed, Louwerens Coll., 
to Leiden Mus. eventually). 

Measured specimens. The c^ holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. The relatively small size and 
presence of posterior-lateral prothoracic 
setae distinguish this species from other 
short-pubescent ones in New Guinea. The 
individuals listed under Additional material 
are slightly larger than the types and vary 
slightly in form, but seem to be conspecific. 
x\ll have setae at the posterior angles of 
the prothorax as well as before middle, 
and all are 9 9 with 5 setae each side last 
ventral segment. 

Demetrida goroka n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 97, slender, eyes promi- 
nent, elytral apices obliquely subtruncate; 
reddish brown, elytra darker but not black, 
appendages brown; surface short-pubes- 
cent, without reticulate microsculpture but 
sparsely irregularly punctate. Head 0.98 
and 0.96 width prothorax; eyes rather 
abruptly prominent, genae slightly shorter, 
sinuate-oblique; front flattened, irregularly 
impressed. Frothorax narrowly subcordate; 
width length 1.04 and 1.02; base apex 1.26 
and 1.38; base/head 0.86 and 0.91; sides 
broadlv rounded in anterior %, broadly 



150 BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



sinuate before sharply acute posterior 
angles; margins rather wide in proportion 
to width of insect, each with seta slightly 
before middle but none at base; baso- 
lateral areas irregularly impressed, punc- 
tate. Elytra long; width elytra /prothorax 
1.69 and 1.68; apices slightly obliquely 
sinuate-truncate, with outer angles blunted 
or rounded, sutural angles narrowly 
rounded; striae deep, irregularly subpunc- 
tate; 3rd intervals each with 4 special 
punctures in type, the punctures in part 
obscured or absent in paratype. Chas with 
6 or 7 teeth. Secondary sexual characters: 
$ unknown; 9 with 3 apical ventral setae 
each side in both specimens. Measure- 
ments: length ± 9.0; width 2.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 9 "paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,440) 
both from Goroka, N-E. N. G., 1500 m. 
May 22, 1961 (J. L. & M. Gressitt), taken 
in light trap. 

Notes. D. <:oro1<a superficially resembles 
prima and nin,ripennis (below) but has 
wider head \\\\\\ more prominent eyes, 
slightly narrower prothorax ( with more dis- 
tinctly lobed base), and only 3 apical ventral 
setae each side in 9 (probably only 2 in $), 
while 9 9 of prima and nigripennis have 
5 or 6 such setae each side. 

Demetrida prima n. sp. 

Descri])tion. With characters of genus; 
form nearly as in preceding species (goroka. 
Fig. 97), slender, but with eyes less promi- 
nent than in goroka, elytral apices obliquely 
subtruncate; reddish brown; surface short- 
pubescent, without reticulate microsculp- 
ture but sparsely punctulate. Head 0.91 
and 0.87 width prothorax; eyes less promi- 
nent than usual in genus, genae long- 
{)bli((uc. Prothorax narrowly subcordate; 
width/length 1.03 and 1.08; base/apex 1.24 
and 1.11; base/head 0.96 and 0.93; sides 
weakly arcuate anteriorly, broadly sinuate 
before right or slightK' acute well defined 
basal angles; margins moderate, (\ich ap- 
parently with special seta-bearing punc- 



ture near middle of length but not at base 
(these setae and punctures difficult to 
distinguish amid general pubescence); baso- 
lateral impressions punctate. Elytra long; 
width elytra prothorax 1.64 and 1.53; apices 
truncate or weakly sinuate-truncate, with 
outer angles moderately and sutural angles 
more narrowly rounded; striae deep, ir- 
regularly punctate; 3rd interval with ap- 
parently 2-5 special seta-bearing punctures 
( sometimes difficult to distinguish amid 
other punctation ). Clans with 5 or 6 teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters: 6 unknown; 
9 with c. 5 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements: length 9.0-9.8; width 2.8- 
3.0 mm. 

Types. Holotvpe 9 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1200 m. 
Mar. 23, 1963 (Sedlacek), in mercury vapor 
light trap. Additional (99) paratypes 
from N-E. N. G. as follows: 1, Maprick, 
160 m, Dec. 29, 1959-Jan. 17, 1960 (T. C. 
Maa, now in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,441); 1, 
Torricelli Mts., Siaute, sea level, Nov. 9-17, 
1958 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Mumeng, 600 m. Mar. 9, 1962 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The 9 holotype and 
9 paratype from Mumeng. 

Notes. Among New Guinean Demetrida, 
prima should be easily known by form, 
including form of elytral apices, rather large 
size, nearly uniform reddish brown color, 
and short-pubescent surface. 

Superficially prima resembles some Aus- 
tralian species of Demetrida. For example 
it is somewhat similar in form to grandis 
(Chaudoir) of southern Australia but has 
shorter antcnmae, smaller eyes, less promi- 
nent genae, prothorax narrower anteriorly 
with narrower margins, and elytra uni- 
formly brown (not strip(>d as in grandis). 
D. prima also somewhat resembles con- 
stricticeps (Sloane) of southwestern Aus- 
tralia in lonn and is similar in color, but 
]nima has shorter antennae, much less 
prominent genae, less strongU' simiate sides 
ol prothorax, and dilleis in other details. 
And prima differs Ironi l)()th the Aus- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlinaton 



151 



tralian species named and from all other 
Australian species known to me in amount 
and character of pubescence. 

Demetrida nigripenn'is n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 1, figure I; with 
characters of genus; form, elytral apices, 
pubescence, punctation, and other asexual 
characters c. same as in preceding species 
(prima), but color brownish red with 
elytra black or nearly so, and size smaller. 
Head 0.88 and 0.89 width prothorax. Pro- 
thorax: width/length 1.06 and 1.07; base/ 
apex 1.20 and 1.18; base/head 0.90 and 
0.98. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.56 
and 1.64; 3rd intervals with apparently 1-4 
principal seta-bearing punctures (difficult 
to distinguish). Secondary sexual char- 
acters: S tarsi as genus; 6 middle tibiae 
weakly 2-emarginate on inner edge near 
apex; S with c. 4, 9 c. 6 apical ventral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 
8.3-9.0; width 2.5-2.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Louwerens Coll., 
eventually to Leiden Mus.) and 1 S para- 
type (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,442) from Dojo 
[near Hollandia], West N. G., Apr. 1958 
(G. den Hoed); and 1 9 paratype, Hol- 
landia, May 1945 (B. Malkin, U.S.N.M.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
9 paratype. 

Notes. This may prove to be a geographic 
form of the preceding species ( prima ) , but 
more material of both sexes from more 
localities is needed to clarify the relation- 
ship. The form of the c^ middle tibiae is 
unique among known members of the 
genus. 

Demetrida pailens n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 1, figure II; with 
characters of genus; eyes prominent, pro- 
thorax small, cordate-quadrate, and elytral 
apices sinuate-subtruncate and usually sub- 
angulate c. opposite ends 2nd striae; color 
irregular testaceous brown, elytra irregu- 
larly tesselated with small paler spots; sur- 
face long-pubescent, without reticulate mi- 



crosculpture, punctate as described below. 
Head 1.10 and 1.08 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent, genae short-oblique. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.09 and 1.03; base/apex 1.36 
and 1.38; base/head 0.85 and 0.91; side 
margins moderate, entirely fringed with 
long setae; disc irregularly sparsely punc- 
tate. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 2.07 
and 2.17; apices usually as figured, sub- 
angulate or weakly lobed (simply sinuate- 
truncate in 1 specimen), outer angles 
broadly and sutural angles less broadly 
rounded; striae moderately impressed, in 
part slightly interrupted, irregularly sub- 
punctate; intervals all with series of coarse 
seta-bearing punctures among which special 
dorsal punctures are not distinguishable. 
Claws with 7 or 8 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: 6 tarsi as genus; S middle 
tibiae tuberculate-serrate (c. 6 small tuber- 
cles); c^ with c. 4 apical ventral setae each 
side; 9 unknown. Measurements: length 
8-9; width 2.9-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype c5 (Leiden Mus.) and 
4 $ S paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,443) all from Moss Forest Camp (Snow 
Mts.), West N. G., 2800 m, Oct. 9-Nov. 5, 
1938 (Toxopeus). 

Measured specimens. The $ holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. This very distinct species occurs 
at a higher altitude than any other 
Demetrida known to me. The coloration, 
which superficially resembles that of some 
high-altitude Agonini (some Mactdagonum), 
suggests that the insect lives in grass, al- 
though the specimens were taken at "Moss 
Forest Camp." 

The (slight) variation in form of elytral 
apices is one of many examples of individ- 
ual variation in this remarkably variable 
genus. 

Demetrida fesselata n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 98 ) c. average, with eyes promi- 
nent, prothorax small, elytra spined; color 
irregular dark reddish brown, elytra with 



152 BiiUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



numerous small pale flecks forming rows 
most conspicuous on ( but not confined to ) 
odd intervals, legs pale; surface sparsely 
long-pubescent, without reticulate micro- 
sculptme, irregular but scarcely punctate 
except for punctures (variable in size) from 
which hairs rise. Head 1.16 and 1.08 width 
prothorax; eyes prominent, genae nearly as 
long as eyes, oblique. Prothorax small, nar- 
ro\N']y cordate-subquadrate; width length 
1.03 and 1.07; base apex 1.31 and 1.35; 
base head 0.81 and 0.88; sides weakly 
rounded anteriorly, often subangulate near 
middle of length; side margins moderate, 
irregularly fringed for entire length with 
long setae; baso-lateral depressions poorly 
defined, irregular but scarcely punctate. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 2.28 and 
2.23; apices spined, outer angles rounded 
or obtusely blunted (variable), sutural 
angles obtusely blunted; striae lightly im- 
pressed, in part interrupted or reduced to 
rows of punctures; intervals flat but ir- 
regular, odd intervals with series of seta- 
bearing punctures of moderate size, each 
puncture usually on posterior side of a 
broad low tubercle. Claws with c. 6-8 teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters: 6 tarsi as 
genus; i middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate 
(c. 5 widely spaced small tubercles); i 
with 3 (or more?), 9 5 or 6 apical ventral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 8.7- 
9.8; width 3.0-3.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 9 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,444) 
from Mt. Kaindi, N-E. N. G., 2350 in, Jan. 
10 and June 9, 1962 (Sedlaceks), "the 
paratype taken in mercury xapor light 
trap; and 1 additional paratype i without 
head, same locality, 2400 m, Jan. 28, 1963 
(Sedlacek); 3 paratypes, Wau, 2400 m, Jan. 
9-12, 1962 (Sedlaceks); 2 paratypes, 32 km 
S. of Wau, Bulldog Rd., 2850 m. May 29- 
30, 1962 (Sedlacek), light trap. 

Additional material. Papua: 1, Mt. Tafa, 
8500 ft. (c. 2600 m), Mar. 1934 (Cheesman). 
N-E. N. (;.: 1 ,5, Edie Creek, 14 km S\A' 
of \Yau, 2000 m, Fvh. 13, 1962 (S(>dlacek); 



1 9 , Enarotadi, 2000 m, Aug. 1962 ( Sed- 
lacek). West N. G.: I $, Swart Valley, 
\V. ridge 1800-2000 m, Nov. 19, 1958 
( Gressitt ) . 

Measured specimens. The i from Edie 
Creek and the 9 holotype, figures given 
in this order. 

Notes. The specimens before me vary not 
only in size and color but also in fonn of 
outer-apical elytral angles, depth of striae, 
presence or absence of low rounded tuber- 
cles on odd elytral intervals, and in other 
ways. Some of this variation is surely in- 
dividual, but some may be geographic. 
Only additional series from several localities 
can decide this. 

Demefrida crepera n. sp. 

Description. Form and characters c. as in 
preceding species ( fesselata ) except color 
piceous or slightly reddish piceous without 
distinct pale flecks on elytra. Head 1.04 
and 1.05 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width length 1.08 and 1.06; base apex 1.30 
and 1.25; base head 0.85 and 0.85. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 2.05 and 2.12; sculp- 
ture somewhat variable but in general like 
that in preceding species (tesselata), in 
\\'hich the sculpture varies too. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 tarsi as genus; 6 mid- 
dle tibiae tuberculate-serrate ( c. 6 tuber- 
cles); 6 with c. 4, 9 c. 6 apical \entral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 9.5- 
10.4; width 3.1-3.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (A.M.N.H.) and 6 
paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,445) 
from N. slope, Mt. l^ayman, Maneau Rge., 
Papua (the h()lot\pe and 4 parat\pes at 
"No. 4,"' 2230 m, Ma>- 19-June 19, 1953; 1 
paratype, same data except June 1-7; 1 
paratype same except "No. 5," 1550 m. lune 
30-Ju'lv 13) (all specimens collected 1953 
by Ceoffrey M. Tate). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 1, "No. 
10," Purosa Camp, Okapa area, 1950 m, 
Sept. 29, 1959; 1, "No. 6," Pengagl Camp, 
east slopes Mt. W'ilhelm, 2770 m, July 3, 
1959 (both specimens Sixth Archbold Exp., 
L. 1. Hrass. A. M.N. 11.). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 153 



Measured specimens. The S holotype and cles widely spaced ) ; S with 3, 9 4-6 
1 5 paratype. apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
Notes. This form is apparently a geo- mcnts: length 5.6-7.6; width 2.0-2.8 mm. 
graphic representative (perhaps eventually Types. Holotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
to be considered a subspecies) of the pre- 4 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,446) 
ceding species (tesseJata) but is almost from Eramboe, 80 km ex Merauke, West 
black rather than brown, is not distinctly N. G., holotype Feb. 1, paratypes Jan. 29, 
pale-speckled, is slightly larger, and differs Feb. 5, 1960 (T. C. Maa). 
slightly in proportions, especially in having Additional material Papua: 1 £ , Aroa 
relatively narrower elytra. Estate, W. of Redscar Bay, 1 m, Sept. 29, 
All individuals of the type series have 1958 (Gressitt); 1 $ , Bisianumu, E. of Port 
moth scales stuck to them, indicating that Moresby, 500 m, Sept. 23, 1955 (Gressitt); 
they were taken in light traps. 1, Daradae nr. Javarere, Musgrove R., 100 

m?, Oct. 2, 1958 (Gressitt); 4, Mt. Laming- 

Demetrida seriata n. sp. ton, 1300-1500 ft. {c. 400-460 m) (C. T. 

Description. With characters of genus; McNamara, S. Australian Mus.). 

form c. average, with prominent eyes, sub- Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 

cordate prothorax, elytra with sinuate- 1 ? paratype. 

truncate apices and usually slightly nar- ^otes. This species is characterized by 
rowed to\N'ard base; color brown or relatively numerous dorsal elytral seta- 
testaceous; surface not obviously pubescent bearing punctures. Notable also is pres- 
( actually very sparsely and inconspicuously ence of a little sparse, inconspicuous pubes- 
so); reticulate microsculpture present (faint) cence (not visible on sides of head behind 
only on elytra. Head 1.06 and 0.98 (some- eyes) and of several weak outward-directed 
times less) width prothorax; eyes promi- hairs on margins of prothorax near anterior 
nent, genae short-oblique, not prominent, angles. The species is very distinct and 
Prothorax narrowly subcordate; \\'idth/ probably ranges over the whole length of 
length 1.06 and 1.04 (wider in some speci- New Guinea although it has been found 
mens); base/apex 1.32 and 1.30; base/head thus far only in two widely separated areas 
0.87 and 0.87; sides broadly rather weakly near opposite ends of the island, 
arcuate in anterior %, broadly sinuate before 

c. right posterior angles; each side with Demetnda nub/co/a n. sp. 
seta before middle and at posterior angle Description. See Plate 1, figure III; with 
(all specimens) and additional weaker setae characters of genus; head, prothorax, and 
directed more to side than upward near posterior part of elytra dark red, basal % 
anterior angle; most of disc virtually im- of elytra black with black color extending 
punctate. Elytra: width elytra /prothorax farther back at sides than at suture ( suture 
1.92 and 1.97; apices obliquely sinuate- narrowly red), lower surface red (yellow- 
truncate, with both outer and sutural angles ish on abdomen ) with metastema and con- 
rounded or blunted; striae impressed, tiguous parts of epipleurae dark, femora and 
scarcely punctulate; intervals convex, ir- outer edges of tibiae dark, tarsi and an- 
regularly sparsely punctulate, 3rd with usu- tennae reddish yellow; not obviously pubes- 
ally 6 ( sometimes fewer ) larger seta-bear- cent but with some sparse very inconspicu- 
ing punctures, and 3 or 4 similar punctures ous hairs; reticulate microsculpture absent, 
usually present on 5th intervals. Claws Head 1.06 width prothorax; eyes prominent, 
with c. 5 teeth. Secondary sexual char- genae shorter, obliquely rounded into neck; 
acters: S tarsi as genus; 6 middle tibiae front slightly convex, \\'ith 2 impressions 
weakly tuberculate-serrate (c. 6 small tuber- anteriorly ( as usual in genus ) and ir- 



154 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



regularly slightly impressed at middle. Pro- 
thorax siibquadrate with base slightly 
broader and apex narrower than usual; 
width/length 1.03; base/apex 1.48; base/ 
head 0.92; sides weakly arcuate for much of 
length, subangulate at median-lateral setae, 
strongly sinuate before slightly acute promi- 
nent posterior angles; margins moderate, 
each with seta-bearing puncture c. % from 
apex and at basal angle, and with several 
much finer hairs directed laterally near an- 
terior angles; disc moderately (not strongly) 
convex, baso-lateral impressions present 
but irregular, subpunctate. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 2.11; apices sinuate-trun- 
cate, outer angles broadly rounded, sutural 
angles blunted; striae well impressed, finely 
punctulate; intervals convex, 3rd with c. 
7 and 5th with 4 or 5 seta-bearing punc- 
tures. Claws with c. 5 teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: i unknown; 9 with 4 
apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
ments: length 7.8; width 2.8 mm. 

Type. Holotype $ (Leiden Mus.) from 
Lower Mist Camp [Snow Mts.], West 
N. G., 1550 m, Jan. 31, 1939 (Toxopeus); 
the type is unique. 

Notes. This distinct species is the only 
known Demetrida that combines unarmed 
elytral apices with dual (black and red) 
coloration. The sparse, very inconspicuous 
pubescence and the extra seta-bearing 
punctures of 3rd and 5th elytral intervals 
are noteworthy too. The form of elytral 
apices and the character of pubescence and 
setae suggest a relationship with seriata, 
but nuhicola is specifically distinct not only 
in color but also in form of prothorax. 

Demetrida magna n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form large, slender, with large eyes, long- 
quadrate or trapezoidal [)r()tliorax, elytra 
sinuate-truncate at apex; color entirely red- 
dish brown; surface not jMibescent, reticu- 
late microsculpturc distinct (and sliglitly 
transverse) only on elytra, punctation as 
described below. Head 0.94 and 0.98 



width prothorax; eyes prominent, genae 
short and oblique. Prothorax long, sub- 
parallel or trapezoidal; width length 0.98 
and 1.00; base/apex 1.46 and 1.58; base/ 
head 1.01 and 1.01; sides broadly arcuate 
anteriorly, usually broadly sinuate before 
right or slightly acute usually blunted pos- 
terior angles; margins moderate, each with 
seta at basal angle and before middle; disc 
fainth' or not punctulate except irregularly 
subpunctate in baso-lateral depressions. 
Elytra long; width elytra prothorax 1.92 
and — ( elytra of 2nd specimen too spread 
for measurement ) ; apices obliquely sinuate- 
truncate, outer angles well defined (some- 
times slightly blunted), sutural angles nar- 
rowly rounded or blunted; striae impressed, 
faintly punctulate; intervals convex, sparsely 
punctulate, 3rd with 2 seta-bearing punc- 
tures (present in all specimens but varying 
in position). Cdows with c. 7 or 8 teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters: S tarsi as 
genus; $ middle tibiae weakly tuberculate- 
serrate; £ with 3, 4, or 5 (number some- 
times unsymmetric), 9 c. 6 apical ventral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 
10.3-12.0; width 3.3-4.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) from 
Finschhafen, Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., 20- 
150 m, Apr. 15, 1963 (Sedlacek). Para- 
types as follows: N-E. N. G.: 2 ( ,$ 9 ), 
Pindiu, Huon Pen., 870-1300 m, Apr. 20, 
21-22, 1963 (Sedlacek, M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,447); 1 9 , Adalbert Mts., Wanuma, 800- 
1000 m, Oct. 25, 1958 (Gressitt); 1, Mark- 
ham R., 10 m, Jan. 18, 1961 (Sedlaceks). 
Papua: 1, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m). May 
1933 (Cheesman); 1, Owen Stanlev Rge., 
Goilala, Loloipa, Feb. 1-15, 1958 (w. W. 
Brandt. Bishop Mus.); 1, Mt. Lamington, 
1300-1500 ft. {c. 400-460 m) (C. T. 
McNamara, S. Australian Mus.). West 
N. G. : 1 ^ , Guega, \\\ of Swart Valley, 
1200 m, Nov. 15, i958 (Gressitt). 

Measured s])ecimens. The i holotype and 
9 paratype from Adalbert Mts. 

Notes. Comparative characters of mapia 
are gi\(>n in tlie preceding Key. The species 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 155 



appears to be widely distributed at low 
altitudes in New Guinea, but not common. 

Demetrida truncata n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. average, but variable; entirely 
reddish brown; not pubescent, reticulate 
microsculpture present ( but light and vari- 
able) only on elytra, and surface not or 
not much punctulate. Head 0.96 and 0.91 
width prothorax; eyes moderately promi- 
nent, genae much shorter, oblique. Pro- 
thorax rather long, variable in shape (nar- 
rowly subcordate to trapezoidal); width/ 
length 1.07 and 1.05; base apex 1.37 and 
1.38; base/head 0.95 and 1.02; sides vari- 
ably arcuate anteriorly, broadly sinuate be- 
fore right or slightly acute blunted or well 
defined posterior angles; margins moderate, 
each usually with seta at or near basal 
angle and before middle (but see Notes 
below); disc smooth at middle, slightly 
wrinkled or subpunctate at base and sides. 
Elytra long; width elytra prothorax 1.80 
and 1.78; apices obliquely sinuate-truncate, 
outer angles well defined (c. right but 
shghtly variable), sutural angles narrowly 
rounded; striae impressed, punctulate; in- 
tervals ± punctulate, often with an irregu- 
lar row of small punctures near middle each 
interval, 3rd with 2 dorsal punctures in all 
specimens. Claws with 7 or 8 teeth. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters: $ tarsi as genus; 
S middle tibiae finely tuberculate-serrate 
(about 9 slight tubercles); S with 3 or 4, 
9 5 or 6 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements: length 7.0-9.8; width 2.5- 
3.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1150 m, 
Oct. 16, 1961 (Sedlacek); and paratypes as 
follows. N-E. N. G.: I 6, Wau, Mt. Mis- 
sim, 880-1050 m, Feb. 8-9, 1963 (Sedlacek); 
1 9 , Busu R., E. of Lae, 100 m, Sept. 14, 
1955 (Gressitt); 1 9, Finschhafen, Huon 
Pen., 180 m, Apr. 16, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1 i , 
Torricelli Mts., Mobitei, 750 m, Feb. 28- 
Mar. 4, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 
West N. G.: 1 9 , Hollandia, Nov. 21, 1944 



(H. Hoogstraal, M.C.Z.); 1 9 , Wans, S. of 
Hollandia, 450-500 m, Aug. 16-23, 1959 
(T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1 9, Jutefa 
Bay, Pim, sea level-100 ft. (30 m), Feb. 
1936 ( Cheesman ) ; 1 $ , mountain slope 
above Bernhard Camp, 750 m, Mar. 1939 
(Toxopeus). (Some paratypes in M.C.Z., 
Type No. 31,448.) 

Additional material N-E. N. G.: 1 9, 
Finisterre Rge., Saidor: Aiyawa Village, 
June 16-23, 1958 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.). West N. G.: 1 teneral 9, Hol- 
landia, 250 ft. (c. 75 m), Nov. 3, 1944 
(H. Hoogstraal, M.C.Z.); 1 9, Camp 1, 
Mt. Xok, Waigeu Is., 2500 ft. (c. 760 m). 
May 1938 (Cheesman). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
the 9 paratype from Busu R. 

Notes. This species (if it is all one 
species) is widely distributed at low alti- 
tudes in central and western New Guinea. 
It is not recorded in Papua and may be 
replaced there by the following species 
(minor). Much more material from many 
localities is needed to establish the specific 
limits and geographic variation of these 
forms. 

Although truncata usually has a seta- 
bearing puncture at or near each posterior 
prothoracic angle, the individual from 
Jutefa Bay has a well developed seta on 
the right but no trace of seta or puncture 
on the left, and seta and puncture are 
lacking on both sides in the individual from 
the Finisterre Range. The types and other 
specimens listed above vary in other ways 
the significance of which cannot be deter- 
mined without more material. For example, 
the prothorax is narrowly subcordate or 
subquadrate in most of the types while 
the individual from Waigeu Is. has the 
prothorax strikingly trapezoidal, but the 
extremes are connected by intermediates. 

Demetrida minor n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in truncata except outer apical 
elytral angles c. rounded; reddish brown; 
not pubescent, reticulate microsculpture in- 



156 BuUetin Musciiiu of ConijMirafivc Zoology. Vol. 137. No. 1 



distinct or lightly indicated on elytra, sur- 
face very little punctulate. Head 0.89 and 
1.02 width prothorax; eyes prominent, 
genae short and oblique. Frothorax quad- 
rate-subcordate; width/length 1.17 and 1.08; 
base/apex 1.52 and 1.44; base/ head 1.03 
and 0.97; sides broadly rounded in anterior 
■")4, broadly sinuate before right-obtuse, 
slightly blunted basal angles; margins mod- 
erate, each with seta at base and before 
middle (posterior seta-bearing puncture 
present on both sides in all specimens); 
disc scarcely punctate. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.71 and 2.02; apices 
obliquely sinuate-truncate, outer angles 
blunted or rounded, sutural angles narrowly 
rounded; striae impressed, faintly or not 
punctulate; intervals sparsely inconspicu- 
ously punctulate, 3rd with 2 dorsal punc- 
tures. Claics with c. 5 teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: i tarsi as genus; c^ 
middle tibiae weakly tuberculate-serrate; 
S with 2, 9 4 apical ventral setae each 
side. Measurements: length 5.6-6.3; width 
2.0-2.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,449) and 1 S paratype from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
1 9 paratype from Brown R., Papua, 5 m, 
Oct. 23, 1960 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The A holotype and 
9 paratype. 

Notes. This species is probably related to 
truncata but is smaller, with more rounded 
outer apical elytral angles and fewer apical 
vc^ntral setae. 

Demetrida subfenuis n. sp. 

Descriplion. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 99) c. as in truncata and minor 
but more slender; reddish brown; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture at most 
faintly indicated on elytra, surface not 
Diueli puiictiilate. Head 1.09 and 1.04 
width prothorax; eyes proiniiiciit. genae 
short and oblicjue, not jiioniinent. Pro- 
tliorax el()ngate-su1)(ina(hal('; width length 
0.89 and 0.94; base apex 1 .,36 and 1.40; 



base/head 0.88 and 0.96; sides weakly 
arcuate in much of length, broadly sinuate 
well before c. right, scarcely blunted basal 
angles; margins narrow, each with seta- 
bearing puncture before middle but none 
at base. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
2.08 and — ( elytra of 2nd specimen too 
spread to measure); apices obliquely sinu- 
ate-truncate, with outer angles obtuse and 
slightly blunted or narrowly rounded and 
sutural angles blunted; striae impressed, 
faintly punctulate; intervals slightly punc- 
tulate, 3rd with 2 dorsal punctures. Claics 
with 5 or 6 teeth. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: 6 tarsi as genus; i middle tibiae ± 
bent-in and weakly tuberculate-serrate; S 
with 3 apical ventral setae each side (both 
sides both specimens); 9 unknown. Mea- 
surements: length c. 7.0; w idth c. 2.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype c5 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wum, Upper Jimmi Valley, N-E. N. G., 
840 m, July 17, 1955 (Gressitt); and 1 
broken i paratype (M.G.Z., Tvpe No. 
31,450), vie. Hollandia, West N. G., July- 
Sept. 1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. D. suhlcnuis resembles minor 
(above) but is much narrower and lacks 
posterior-latt>raI prothoracic setae, which 
are present in minor. 

Demetrida tenuis n. sp. 

Dcscri})tion. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 100) c. as in preceding species 
(suhtcntii.s) but even more slender; brownish 
led, legs slightly paler; not pubescent, 
reticulate microsculpture visible (but very 
light) only on elytra, surface not much 
punctulate. IIc(ul 1.09 and 1.07 width pro- 
thorax; eyes large, moderatcK' prominent, 
genae much short(M-, oblicpie but conxexly 
prominent; Iront carinate at middle anteri- 
orl\- (all sj)i'eimens). ProtJiorax elongate- 
(juadrate; width length 0.84 and 0.93; base/ 
apex 1.21 and 1.19; base head 0.87 and 0.83; 
sides very wcakK' irregularK' anuulate, verv 
broadly sinuate belore right or slightly 
obtuse but well deliiicd basal angles; mar- 
gins rati It r narrow, each with seta-bear- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



157 



ing puncture before middle but without 
posterior seta or puncture; disc faintly 
pinictulate, wrinkled or subpunctate in 
baso-lateral areas. Elytra: width elytra, 
prothorax 2.36 and 2.32; apices sinu- 
ate-truncate, outer and sutural angles ± 
rounded; striae impressed, punctulate; in- 
tervals slightly convex, faintly sparsely 
punctulate, 3rd with 1 dorsal puncture, c. 
Vi or less from apex (both sides all ex- 
amples). Claws with c. 4 teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 tarsi as genus; 6 
middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate (4 tuber- 
cles); S with 1, 9 2 apical ventral setae 
each side. Measurements: length c. 6.0- 
6.5; width 2.0-2.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ ( Bishop Mus. ) from 
Aroa Estate, W. of Redscar Bay, Papua, 
1 m, Sept. 29, 1958 (Gressitt);' and 1 9 
paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,451) from 
Owen Stanley Rge., Papua, Goilala: Lo- 
loipa, Feb. 1-15, 1958 (W. W. Brandt); 1 
c5 paratvpe, Brown R., 20 km N. of Port 
Moresby, Apr. 29, 1960 (C. W. O'Brien, 
Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The 9 holotype and 
9 paratype. 

Notes. D. tenuis is characterized by small 
size, very narrow form especially of pro- 
thorax, carination of front, 1-punctate 3rd 
elytral intervals, and small number of setae 
of apical ventral segment. The last three 
characters are unique among New Guinean 
Demetrida, but some Australian species 
have 1-punctate 3rd intervals, as indicated 
in Notes under the genus and in Footnote 3 
(p. 143). 

Demetrida tripuncfa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. average, except genae angulate, 
elytral apices obtusely angulate; reddish 
brown; not pubescent, reticulate micro- 
sculpture distinct ( but light ) only on elytra, 
surface not much punctulate. Head 1.06 
and 0.94 width prothorax; eyes large, promi- 
nent (slightly variable), genae shghtly 
shorter than eyes, subangulately prominent; 



front flattened and irregularly impressed 
anteriorly. Prothorax subquadrate; width/ 
length 1.04 and 1.06; base/apex 1.28 and 
1.14; base head 0.80 and 0.87; sides 
broadly irregularly arcuate in c. anterior %, 
broadly sinuate before c. right but blunted 
posterior angles; margins moderate, each 
with seta before middle but none at 
posterior angle; surface punctate-wrinkled 
in baso-lateral impressions and margins. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax — (elytra 
spread) and 1.91; apices obtusely angulate, 
with outer angles right or slightly obtuse, 
sutural angles obtuse; striae impressed, 
sometimes finely punctulate; intervals con- 
vex, sparsely punctulate, 3rd with 3 dorsal 
punctures (all specimens). Claws with c. 
6 long teeth and sometimes an additional 
minute one. Secondary sexual characters: 

5 tarsi as genus; 6 middle tibiae slightly 
bent-in near apex but not tuberculate-ser- 
rate; i with apparently 3, 9 6-8 apical 
ventral setae each side. Measurements: 
length c. 8-9; width 3.0-3.3 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,452) from Hollandia, West N. G., Nov. 
21, 1944 (Hoogstraal). 

Additional material. Papua: 1 S , Ori- 
omo Govt. Sta., W. District, Oct. 26-28, 
1960 (Gressitt), taken in Malaise trap; 1 
9 , Brown R., 5 m, Oct. 23, 1960 (Gressitt), 
taken on palm. N-E. N. G.: 1 9, Bulolo, 
730 m, Aug. 15, 1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., 
Bishop Mus.), taken in light trap. 

Measured specimens. The 6 from Papua 
and the 9 holotype, in this order. 

Notes. The subangulate genae distin- 
guish this species from all the preceding 
ones except tenuis, which is very different 
in many ways (see preceding Key to Species 
of Demetrida). 

The four specimens listed above agree in 
a general way and in such important char- 
acters as prominence of genae, 3-punctate 
3rd intervals, and obtusely angulate elytral 
apices, but they are from scattered localities 
and they differ in many details. The single 

6 is teneral and warped so that width of 



158 Bulletin Miiscinii of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



elytra cannot be measured, and some other 
characters are difficult to see. More ma- 
terial is needed to show whether all these 
specimens really are conspecific. 

Demefrida genicula n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 101) as in preceding species 
( tripuncta ) but elytral apices acutely 
toothed; reddish brown; not pubescent, 
reticulate microsculpture distinct (but light) 
only on elytra, surface not much punctulate. 
Head 1.08 and 1.03 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent, genae subangulately prominent; 
front flattened and irregularly slightly im- 
pressed anteriorly. Prothorax quadrate- 
subcordate; width length 0.97 and 1.04; 
base/apex 1.24 and 1.19; base/head 0.(S3 
and 0.S3; sides irregularly weakly arcuate in 
anterior 'n, strongly sinuate before right or 
slightly acute slightly blunted posterior 
angles; margins moderate, each with seta- 
bearing puncture just before middle but 
none at base; disc weakly strigulose or sub- 
punctate especially laterally. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.89 and 1.98; apices with 
short spines or acute teeth, outer angles 
sharply defined, right or slightly acute, 
sutural angles obtuse; striae impressed, 
scarcely punctulate; intervals convex, 
slightly sparsely punctulate, 3rd usually 3- 
punctate (4-punctate on left side only in in- 
dividual from above Bernhard Camp). 
Claw.') with 5 or 6 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: i tarsi as genus; i middle 
tibiae bent-in at apex but not tuberculate- 
serrate; 6 with .3 or 4, 9 4 or 5 apical ventral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 8.2- 
9.2; width 2.6-3.0 mm. 

Types, [lolotvpe 6 (U.S.N.M.) from 
Iloliandia, West N. G. (J. W. Bongberg); 
and paratypes as follows. West N. G.: 1 
9 , Mountain slope above Bernhard Camp, 
100 m, Apr. 19.39 (Toxopeus). N-E. N. (;.: 
1 9 , Wan, Morobe Dist., 1200 m, Oct. 29, 
1961 (Sedlacek); 1$, Erima, Astrolabe 
Bay, 1896 (Biro). Pa|Mia: 1, Daradae, 
near Javarere, Musgrove R., 100 m, Oct. 4, 
1958 (Gressitt). 



Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 1 9, 
Tsenga, Upper Jimmi Vallev, 1200 m, Julv 
14, 1955 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
the 9 paratype from Wau. 

Notes. The acutely dentate or short- 
spined rather than obtusely angulate elytral 
apices distinguish this from the preceding 
species (tripuncta). More material, espe- 
cially a good series taken at one time and 
place, is needed to show whether the dif- 
ference is in fact specific. 

Demefrida lafongula n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 102) small and moderately broad 
(in genus); reddish brown; not pubescent, 
reticulate microsculpture present (some- 
times faint, and slightly transverse ) only 
on elytra, surface not much punctulate. 
Head 0.89 and 0.91 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent, genae short, not prominent; 
front slightly irregularly impressed or with 
punctiform impression before middle. Pro- 
thorax subcordate, wide; width length 1.35 
and 1.35; base apex 1..38 and 1.39; base' 
head 0.97 and 0.94; sides broadly rounded 
anteriorly, sinuate before well defined right 
(sometimes slightly obtuse or acute) basal 
angles; margins moderately wide, each with 
seta before middle but none at base; disc 
sometimes slightly wrinkled or subpunctate 
basally and laterally. Elytra rather short 
and broad (in genus); width elytra pro- 
thorax 1.85 and 1.78; apices obtusely an- 
gulate, with outer angles obtuse and usually 
slightly blunted, sutural angles blunted; 
striae imjiresscHl, \ aguely or not punctulate; 
inter\'als convex, si)arsel\- pimctulate, 3rd 
with 2 dorsal punctures. Clans with 3 or 
4 teeth (and sometimes a small 5th one). 
Secondary sexucd characters: i tarsi as 
genus; ,5 middle tibiae strongK' tubercu- 
late-serratc>; .s w ith 2 or 3, 9 3 or 4 apical 
\ciitral setae each side. Measurements: 
length 5.5-7.1; width 2.3-2.9 mm. 

Types. Ilolotype $ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Bisianumu, Iv of Port Mor(\sbv, Pajma, 
500 m, Sejit. 3, 1959 (T. C. Maa); and 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



159 



paratypes as follows. Papua: 1 ? , Brown 
R., E. of Port Moresby, 100 m, June 8, 
1955 (Gressitt, now in M.C.Z., Type No. 
.31,453); 1 9, Brown R., May 21, 1956 
(E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.); 1, Mt. 
Lamington, 1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m) 
(C. T. McNamara, S. Australian Mus.); 1, 
Buna Bay (C. T. McNamara, S. Australian 
Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 1 9, Huon Pen., 
Pindiu, Apr. 20, 1963 (Sedlacek). West 
N. G.: 1 c^ , Maffin Bay, Sept. 1944 (E. S. 
Ross, Cal. Acad.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Brown R. 

Notes. This apparently widely distributed 
lowland species is characterized by small 
size, relatively broad form, and obtuse an- 
gulation of elytral apices. See preceding 
Key to Species of Demetrida for further 
differential characters. 

Demetrida angulata n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slender-average, with obtusely angu- 
late elytral apices; reddish browai; not pubes- 
cent, reticulate microsculpture distinct (light 
and usually slightly transverse) only on 
elytra, surface not much punctulate. Head 
1.07 and 1.08 width prothorax; eyes promi- 
nent, genae short, oblique, not prominent. 
Prothorax subquadrate, narrow; width/ 
length 1.01 and 1.04; base/apex 1.40 and 
1.31; base/head 0.88 and 0.87; sides weakly 
irregularly arcuate (sometimes almost par- 
allel) in c. anterior %, broadly sinuate be- 
fore ± right but blunted posterior angles; 
margins moderate, each with seta-bearing 
puncture before middle but none at base; 
disc variably wrinkled or subpunctate pos- 
teriorly and laterally. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.88 and 2.08; apices obtusely 
angulate, outer angles sharply defined but 
varying from slightly obtuse to acute, 
sutural angles blunted; striae impressed, 
usually faintly punctulate; intervals convex, 
sparsely inconspicuously punctulate, 3rd 
with 2 dorsal punctures. Claws with 5 or 
6 teeth. Secondary sexual characters: S 
tarsi as genus; i middle tibiae scarcely 



modified, slightly bent-in near apex, not 
distinctly tuberculate-serrate; S with 3 or 4, 
9 5 or 6 setae each side last ventral 
segment. Measurements: length 7.5-8.9; 
width 2.5-3.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Brown R., Papua, Sept. 30, 1959 (T. C. 
Maa), taken sweeping; and paratypes as 
follows (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,454). 
Papua: 1 9 , same data as type except 
dated Aug. 30, 1959; 1 9 , Brown R., E. of 
Port Moresby, 100 m, June 8, 1955 (Gres- 
sitt); 1, same locality, Apr. 27, 1960 (C. 
W. Obrien, Bishop Mus.); 1 9, Laloki, nr. 
Port Moresby, Aug. 30-Sept. 2, 1959 (T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1 9, Kiunga, Fly R., 
July 11-14, 1957 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.); 1 9, Daradae, nr. Javarere, Mus- 
grove R., 100 m, Oct. 2, 1958 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1st 9 paratype from Brown River. 

Notes. See Key to Species of Demetrida 
of New Guinea for distinguishing charac- 
ters of an<i,ulata. It is the only New Guin- 
ean Demetrida known to occur also in 
Australia ( 1 9 , Rocky R., mid-peninsular 
Cape York). In New Guinea, it has been 
found only in Papua. 

Demetrida reversa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form of preceding species (angulata) but 
slightly less narrow; reddish brown; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture distinct 
(and somewhat transverse) only on elytra, 
but much of surface sparsely punctulate. 
Head 1.03 and 1.07 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent, genae short and oblique, not 
prominent. Prothorax subquadrate; width/ 
length 1.10 and 1.12; base apex 1.32 and 
1.31; base head 0.94 and 0.98; sides nearly 
straight and subparallel or slightly con- 
verging anteriorly, subangulate at setae, 
broadly sinuate before right or slightly 
acute basal angles; margins moderate, each 
with seta-bearing puncture at or before 
middle but none at base; disc slightly ir- 
regularly subpunctate at base and laterally. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.85 and 



160 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



1.83; apices ungulate (the angles c. right, 
but variable), outer angles right or acute, 
sharply formed; sutural angles obtuse- 
blunted; striae impressed, faintly punc- 
tulate; intervals sparsely punctulate, 3rd 
with 2 dorsal punctures. Claws with 6 or 7 
teeth. Secondary .sexual chaiacter.s: S tarsi 
as genus; i middle tibiae slightly bent out 
near apex, inconspicuously or irregularly 
tuberculate-serrate (Fig. 162); i with c. 
3, 9 c. 6 setae each side last ventral seg- 
ment. Measurements: length 8.5-9.2; width 
3.0-3.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 ( Bishop Mus. ) and 
7 paratypes (3 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,455) 
from Guega, W. of Swart Valley, West 
N. G., 1200 m, Nov. 14, 15, 1958 (Gressitt), 
and 1 paratype, Swart Valley, W. Fork, 
1300-1350 m, Nov. 17, 1958 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Guega. 

Notes. Among similar species with angu- 
late but not spined elytral apices, this is 
distinguished by quadrate prothorax, pro- 
portions as given, and especially by form 
of 6 middle tibiae, slightly bent outaard 
at apex. Nevertheless the present species 
may be closely related to the preceding one 
[an^ulata), which is known only from 
Papua (and Australia), while the present 
one is known only from a restricted area 
of West New Guinea. 

Demefrida kokoda n. sp. 

Descri])(ion. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 103, large, slender; 
reddish brown; not pubescent, reticulate 
microsculpture present (light or iaint) onK- 
on elytra, surface not much |)unctulate. 
Head 0.99 and 0.99 width prothorax; exes 
slightK' smaller than usual but prominent, 
genae scarcely distinct from neck. Prothorax 
cordate-subquadrate; widtli knigth 1.11 and 
1.12; base/apex 1.22 and 1.23; base head 
0.84 and 0.87; sides strongh' rounded in 
anterior %, strongly sinuate before c. right 
or slightly acute but blunted [)()st('rior 
angles; margins narrow, each with seta 
slightly before middle but none at base; 



disc with middle line finer than usual in 
genus, baso-lateral areas slightly punctate. 
Elytra very long; width elytra ^ prothorax 
1.72 and c. 1.86 (elytra spread); apices 
with moderate spines, outer angles c. right 
or slightly acute, sharply formed, sutural 
angles slightly obtuse, sometimes denticu- 
late; striae impressed, punctulate; intervals 
only slightly convex, scarcely punctulate, 
3rd with 2 seta-bearing punctures. Claws 
with 7 or 8 teeth. Secondary .sexual char- 
acters: 6 tarsi as genus; i middle tibiae 
weakly tuberculate-serrate; i with c. 4, 9 
numerous (up to 9) apical ventral setae 
each side. Measurements: length c. 10.0- 
11.0; width 2.9-3.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype i ( British Mus. ) and 
5 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,456) 
from Kokoda, Papua, 1200 ft. (366 m). 
May, Aug. (holotype), Sept., Oct., 1933 
( Cheesman ) ; 1 paratype, Popondetta, 
Papua, 25 m, June 1966 ( Shanahan-Lip- 
pert. Bishop Mus.). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 1 9, 
Wau, Morobe Dist., 1050 m, Apr. 30, 1962 
(Sedlacek). West N. G.: 1 9, Waris. S. 
of Ilollandia, 450-500 m, Aug. 24-31, 1959 
(T. G. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1 9 , Hollandia. 
J:m. 1945 (B. Malkin, U.S.N.M.). 

Measured sj)ecimens. The c5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. The form ol this species is uni({ue 
in the genus, so far as I know, and other 
characters including the relatixely fine 
middle line ol the pronotum are distinctixe. 

Demetrida moda n. sp. 

Description. See Phite 1, figure I\'; with 
characters of genus; reddish brown; not 
pubesci'ut, reticulate microsculpture distinct 
(but light) onl\' on elytra, parts ol upper 
siu"lace sparsely j)unctulate. Head 0.85 
and 0.84 width prothorax; e\'es prominent, 
genae short, obliciue. not jirominent. Vro- 
thorax subcordalc; width length 1.46 and 
1.33; base /apex 1.40 and 1.37; base/head 
1.02 and 1.04; sides arcuate^ anteriorly, 
strongly sinuate belorc sharply defined right 
or acute posteiioi- angles; margins moderate. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



161 



each with seta before middle but none at 
base; disc slightly punctate basally. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.69 and 1.77; apices 
with moderate spines, outer angles obtuse, 
sutinal angles obtuse; striae impressed, 
faintly punctulate; 3rd intervals 2-punctate. 
Claws with c. 4 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: 6 tarsi as genus; 6 middle 
tibiae strongly tuberculate-serrate ( c. 4 
rounded tubercles, Fig. 160); i with 2, 9 
3 apical ventral setae each side (number 
may vary). Measurements: length c. 5.5- 
6.5; width 2.1-2.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,457) and 4 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington), and 
additional paratvpes as follows. Papua: 8, 
Kokoda, 1200 ft.' (366 m), Aug., Sept., Oct., 
1933 (Cheesman). N-E. N. G.: 2, Sattel- 
berg, Huon Gulf, 1899 (Biro). 

Additional material N-E. N. G.: 2, 
Pindiu, Huon Pen. (1 labeled 500-600 m), 
Apr. 19, 20, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Finschhafen, 
May 7, 1944 (E. S. Ross, Gal. Acad.); 1, 
Bubia, Sept. 1949 ( N. L. H. Krauss, Bishop 
Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This species, as the name moda 
is intended to suggest, is the first of several 
generally similar forms which differ among 
themselves slightly in proportions and color 
and more significantly in length of elytral 
spines and punctation of 3rd elytral inter- 
vals. Some of these forms may be geo- 
graphically limited and allopatric and may 
eventually be considered subspecies. The 
present species seems to be confined to the 
eastern half of New Guinea. Its differential 
characters are given in the preceding Key 
to species. 

Demefrida submoda n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form of preceding species (rnoda) except 
elytra acutely toothed, not spined, and 
proportions slightly different, with head rel- 
atively slightly wider and base of prothorax 
narrower; color, microsculpture, etc. as in 



moda. Head 0.89 and 0.91 width prothorax; 
eyes prominent, genae short and oblicjue. 
Prothorax subcordate; width/length 1.40 
and 1.37; base/apex 1.43 and 1.45; base/ 
head 0.97 and 0.95; sides rounded anteriorly, 
strongly sinuate before c. right posterior 
angles; margins rather wide, each with seta 
near or before middle but none at base; 
disc slightly irregular or subpunctate baso- 
laterally. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.70 and 1.81; apices acutely angulate or 
denticulate, outer angles obtuse or blunted, 
sutural angles obtuse; striae impressed, not 
distinctly punctulate; intervals convex, 
slightly inconspicuously punctulate, 3rd 2- 
punctate. Claws with c. 5 teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 tarsi as genus; 6 mid- 
dle tibiae tuberculate-serrate (4 tubercles); 
6 with 2, 9 3 apical ventral setae each 
side. Measurements: length 6.0-7.0; width 
2.3-2.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
17 paratypes (7 in M.G.Z., Type No. 
31,458) from Wau and vicinity (including 
Mt. Missim), Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 
altitudes from 950 to 1400 m, dates in Jan., 
Feb., Mav, Julv, Aug., Sept., Nov., Dec, 
1961-1964 (Sedlaceks, T. G. Maa) (holo- 
type, 1250 m. May 3, 1963); and additional 
paratvpes from N-E. N. G. as follows: 2, 
Bulolo, 1065 m, Aug. 15, 16, 1956 (E. J. 
Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.); 1, Upper Watut 
R., 24 km W. Bulolo, 760 m. Mar. 5-6, 
1963 (Sedlacek). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 1, vie. 
Nadzab, July 1944 (Darlington); 2, Kas- 
sem, 48 km E. of Kainantu, 1350 m, Nov. 
7, 1959 (T. G. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Kumun, Upper Jimmi Valley, 1000 m, July 
13, _ (Gressitt); 1, Maprik, 150 m, Dec. 
29-Jan. 17, 1960 (T. G. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 
1, Eliptamin ^^^, 1200-1350 m, July 16-31, 
1959 (W. W.' Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Goroka, 1550 m, June 19, 1955 (Gressitt), 
"pigeon peas cane." West N. G.: 1, Hol- 
landia, Dec. 15, 1944 ( Hoogstraal, M.G.Z.). 

Measured s})ecinwns. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Wau. 

Notes. This species differs from moda 



162 Bulletin Museum of Coinparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



as indicated in tht' preceding Description. 
It may prove to be only a subspecies of 
moda, and has thus far been found only in 
the central-eastern part of the north side 
of New Guinea, chieflv in the lower moun- 
tains. 

Demetrida hollandia n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. of moda and suhmoda (above) but 
color darker, reddish brown with elytra 
darker brown or brownish black with apical 
% or less often paler, the pale apical area 
varying in distinctness and extent; micro- 
sculpture, etc. c. as in moda, with reticula- 
tions faint but usually visible on elytra. 
Head 0.89 and 0.(S8 width prothorax, eyes 
prominent, genae short. Prothorax sub- 
cordate, slightly narrower than in moda; 
width length 1.32 and 1.31; base/apex 1.36 
and 1.34; base head 0.97 and 0.95; sides 
slightly irregularly rounded, often subangu- 
late at lateral setae; margins moderately 
wide, each with seta near or before middle 
but none at base; siuface not or ver\ Httle 
punctate. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.86 and 1.85; apices short-spined, outer 
angles obtuse but more distinct than in 
moda, sutural angles blunted; striae im- 
pressed, not distinctly punctulate; intervals 
convex, scarcely punctulate, 3rd with 2 
principal punctures and often (not alwa\s) 
with 1 or more intermediate i^unctures 
which vary in size and sometimes do and 
sometimes do not bear setae. CUaus with 
c. 4 te(>th. Secondary sexital characters: i 
tarsi as genus; i middle tibiae strongly 
tuberculate-serrate (c. 4 tubercles); i with 
2, 9 3 apical ventral setae each side. Mea- 
surements: length 5.8-7.6; width 2.1-2.9 
mm. 

Types. Tlolotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,459) and 33 paratypes from vie. ITol- 
laudia. West N. (i., July-Sept. 1944 (Dar- 
lington ). 

Addilional material. West N. (',.: 11, 
Hollandia and vicinity including C]yclops 
Mts., at low altitudes (not over 500 m), 
\ari()us dates and collectors; 10. Maffin 



Bav, dates in June, July, Aug., Sept., Oct. 
1944 (E. S. Ross, Cal. Acad.); 5, Nabire, 
S. Geelvink Bay, 5-50 m, Aug. 25-Sept. 5. 
1962 (Sedlacek); 1, \\'a.sian (Vogelkop), 
Sept. 1939 (Wind, M.C.Z.); 1, Fac Fac, 
June 1939 (Wind, M.C.Z.). N-E. N. G.: 
33, various localities including Fluon Pen.; 
Torricelli Mts.; Sepik Dist.; Wewak; Lae; 
Bulolo; Wau. Papua: 1 teneral 6 , doubt- 
fully identified, from Bisianumu, E. of Port 
Moresby, 500 m, Sept. 24, 1955 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The c5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. D. hollandia seems closely related 
to moda and suhmoda but is distinguished 
by characters given above. Some of the 
specimens listed under Additional material 
\ar\- toward icaii (see below). 

Demetrida wau n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in moda, sidmwda, and hollandia 
but more slender with eyes less prominent 
and genae slightly longer and less abrupt 
than in the species named; reddish brown, 
eU'tra brownish black, usualK' not paler 
at apex; not pubescent, upper surface in- 
cluding elytral disc without reticulate micro- 
sculpture but in part (especialK- cKtra) 
sparseK' punctulate. Head 0.89 and 0.89 
width prothorax; e>'es and genae as indi- 
cated abo\e. Prothorax subcordate; width/ 
length 1.21 and 1.22; base apex 1.44 and 
1.44; base head 0.99 and 0.99; sides rounded 
anteriorly, often subangulate at setae (as in 
hollandia), strongly sinuate before c. right 
basal angles; margins rath(M- wid(\ each 
with seta near or beloic middle but none 
at base; disc more punctate basalh' and 
laterally than in the '^^ preceding species. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.7.3 and 
1.73; a|Mees short-spined (or with long 
acute teeth), with outer angles obtuse 
but distinct, sutural angles blunted; striae 
impressed, punctulate; interxals eou\('x, 
punctulate. 3i(l olten 4-i')unetate but inter- 
mediate |iuiutui('s \aiiabl(' in si/e and 
sometimes absent and with oi' without 
setae. Clans with c. ,5 teeth. Secondary 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlingtofi 



163 



sextial cJiamcters: 6 tarsi as genus; 6 
middle tibiae weakly tuberculate-serrate (c. 
3 tubercles distinct); 6 with 2, 9 3 apical 
ventral setae each side. Measurements: 
length 6.4-7.9; width 2.4-2.9 mrn. 

Types. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
118 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,460) all from Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G.; altitudes from 1000 to 1450 m; 
dates in everv month, 1961-1963 (holotvpe, 
1200 m, July '22, 1961 ) ( Sedlaceks ) . 

Additional material. N-E. N. G. : 9 addi- 
tional teneral, broken, or atypical speci- 
mens from Wau; 1, Jim(m)i R., E. High- 
lands, Julv-Sept. 1961 (W. W. Brandt, 
C.S.I.R.O.); 1, Upper Watut R., 24 km W. 
Bulolo, 760 m, Mar. 5-6, 1963 (Sedlacek); 
1, Erima, Astrolabe Bay, 1897 (Biro). West 
N. G.: 2, Hollandia, May, June 1945 (B. 
Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 1, Waris, S. of Hol- 
landia, 450-500 m, Aug. 16-23, 1959 (T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1, Ifar, 400-550 m, 
June 23, 1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. D. wau may be primarily a geo- 
graphic representative of liollandia, but the 
long type series seems distinct; the speci- 
mens listed above from Hollandia and 
Waris are plainly wau, not hollandia; and 
the one from Ifar seems to be wau except 
that the elytra are distinctly microreticulate. 
Apparent intermediates do occur at some 
other localities, however. They are tenta- 
tively placed with Additional material un- 
der hollandia. See also Notes under D. 
subpunctata (3rd species below). 

One 9 of wau, from Wau, is a note- 
worthy abnormalit)', \\4th the posterior pro- 
thoracic angles irregularly widened and 
each \\'ith 2 setae, although normal in- 
dividuals of wau lack posterior-lateral 
setae. 

Demefrida similis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form of moda, etc. but larger, rather slender, 
with prothorax narrowly subcorclate and 
elytra spined or acutely dentate and with 



outer angles sharply formed; reddish 
brown, elytra not or only slightly darker; 
not pubescent; reticulate microsculpture 
visible (often faint) only on elytra. Head 
0.87 and 0.90 width prothorax; eyes promi- 
nent, genae shorter, oblique. Prothorax 
subcordate; width/length 1.26 and 1.22; 
base/apex 1.35 and 1.34; base/head 0.98 
and 0.98; sides broadly sometimes slightly 
irregularly arcuate in more than % of length, 
strongly sinuate before right or slightly 
acute usually slightly blunted posterior 
angles; margins rather wide, each with 
seta-bearing puncture before middle but 
none at base; disc slightly punctate at 
base and sides. Elytra long; width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.61 and 1.69; apices short- 
spined (rarely only acutely toothed), outer 
angles well formed, varying from slightly 
obtuse to acute, sutural angles blunted- 
obtuse; striae impressed, finely punctulate; 
intervals slightly convex, sparsely finely 
punctulate, 3rd 2-punctate ( all specimens ) . 
Claws with 6 or 7 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: 6 tarsi as genus; S middle 
tibiae tuberculate-serrate (c. 4 tubercles); 
S with 2, 9 3 or 4 apical ventral setae each 
side. Measurements: length 8.8-10.8; width 
3.0-3.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype £ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,461 ) and 3 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratvpes as follows. Papua: 4, 
Kokoda, 1200, 1300 ft. {c. 366, 400 m), 
June, Aug., Sept. 1933 (Cheesman), 1 
labeled also 'Tn fungus. A, & under bark 
behind it," and 1 "At light"; 1, same locality, 
380 m. Mar. 20, 1956 (Gressitt), in light 
trap; 2, Kokoda-Pitoki, 400 m. Nhu". 23, 
1956 (Gressitt); 2, Mt. Lamington, 1300- 
1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m), (C. T. McNamara, 
S. Australian Mus.). 

Additional material. Papua: 1, Kiunga, 
Fly R., Oct. 1-7, 1957 (^^^ ^^^ Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 1, Ebabaang, 
Mongi W\itershed, Huon Pen., 1300-1400 
m, Apr. 16-18, 1955 ( E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 



164 Bulletin Museum of Couiparativc Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Notes. Characters distinguishing this 
species from moda, etc. are given in the 
Description, above; and see also Notes 
under the following species. 

Demefrida duplicafa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in similis (above); reddish 
brown, elytra not or not much darker; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture visible 
only on elytra, more transverse than in 
similis, surface in part sparsely punctulate. 
Head 0.92 and 0.91 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent, genae shorter, oblique. Pro- 
tJiorax quadrate-subcordate; width length 
1.27 and 1.29; base/apex 1.31 and 1.31; 
base/head 0.94 and 0.96; sides (usually a 
little irregularly) rounded anteriorly, sinu- 
ate before c. right but usually blunted pos- 
terior angles; margins rather wide, each 
with seta at or slightly before middle but 
none at base; disc not much punctate 
even basally. Elytra: width elytra/ pro- 
thorax 1.71 and 1.75; apices with moder- 
ate spines, outer angles sharply defined 
and sometimes acutely denticulate, sutural 
angles blunted-obtuse; striae moderately 
impressed, scarcely punctulate; intervals 
slightly convex, 3rd with 2 principal and 
usually one or more smaller intermediate 
dorsal punctures. Claws with c. 5 teeth. 
Secondary sextial characters: i tarsi as 
genus; 6 middle tibiae tubereulate-serrate 
{c. 6 small tubercles); 6 with 2, 9 3 
apical ventral setae each side. Measiire- 
incnts: length c. 8.0-9.0; width 2.9-3.3 
mm. 

ry))es. llolotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,462) and 10 paratypes from Dobodiua, 
l^apiia, Mar.-July 1944 ( Darhiiglon ); 3 
[)aratyp('s bom Kokoda, Papua, 1200 It. 
(366 m), Apr., June, Aug. 1933 (Cheesman); 
94 paratypes, Mt. Lamington, Papua, 1300- 
1500 ft. {c. 400-460 m) (C. T. McNamara, 
S. Australian \bis. ). 

AddHio)ud nialcriid. Si.\t)-one (includ- 
ing 44 from W'au), from 12 localities, in all 
3 political divisions of New (guinea ( from 
Milne lia\ to mountain slojX' al)o\c l^crn- 



hard Camp), altitudes from near sea level 
to at least 1500 m (at Wau), various dates 
and collectors. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. D. duplicata is much like similis 
and occurs at some of the same localities 
l)ut differs constantly (at least at Dobodura) 
by having the elytra more distinctly and 
more transversely microreticulate, with 3rd 
intervals with more than 2 dorsal punctures. 
The additional punctures vary in size and 
sometimes do and sometimes do not bear 
setae. 

At Dobodura, duplicata (like similis) is 
uniformly brown, but individuals with base 
of elytra ± darker occur with brown in- 
di\ iduals at many localities including Wau. 
The color is not obviously dimorphic but 
apparently continuously variable. A re- 
lated population in \\hich the elytra are 
always dark at base occurs in West N. G. 
(see hasalis, p. 172). The specimens sum- 
marized above under Additional material 
vary in other ways which cannot profitably 
be discussed in detail here. 

Demefrida subpuncfafa n. sp. 

Description. ^Vith characters of genus; 
fomi c. as in moda, udti. etc., but slightly 
more slender; dark reddish brown, elytra 
darker (dark castaneous), legs browii; not 
pubescent; microsculpture \isible ( faint, 
distinctK' trans\cM"se ) ouK on eUtra, but 
much of upper surface finely sparsely 
punctulate. Head 1.00 and 0.96 width i^ro- 
thorax; eyes moderate, genae slightb' 
shorter, obliciue. Prothorax narrowly sub- 
cordate; width length 1.16 and 1.16; base 
apex 1.37 and 1.3(S; base head 0.93 and 
().9(S; sides weakly irregularly arcuate in 
anterior "i or more, strongK' sinuate before 
right or slightly acute i)()sterior angles; 
margins narrower than in moda and irau. 
each with seta before middle but none at 
base; sinface rather closely punctate across 
base and in margins. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.8(S and I.SS; ai:)ices with short 
spines, outer angles distinct but obtuse ami 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 165 



sometimes slightly blunted, sutural angles 
blunted or narrowly rounded; striae im- 
pressed, faintly punctulate; intervals con- 
vex, 3rd usually 3- ( rarely 4- ) punctate but 
intermediate puncture(s) variable in size 
and sometimes indistinguishable. Claws 
with c. 4 teeth. Sccondanj sexual characters: 
i tarsi as genus; i middle tibiae tubercu- 
late-serrate ( c. 4 rounded tubercles ) ; S 
with 2, 9 3 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements: length 6.7-7.6; width 2.3- 
2.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,463) and 5 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes from Papua as fol- 
lows: 7, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m), May, 
June, Julv, Aug., Oct. 1933 (Cheesman); 
5, Kokoda-Pitoki, 450 m. Mar. 24, 1956 
(Gressitt); 1, Bisianumu, E. of Pt. Moresby, 
500 m, Sept. 23, 1955 (Gressitt); 1, "Papua," 
(Hungarian Nat. Mus. ); 3, Mt. Lamington, 
1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m) (G. T. Mc- 
Namara, S. Australian Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This may ( or may not ) be the 
Papuan representative of the hollandia-icau 
group of central and western New Guinea. 
D. suhpunctata most resembles wau but is 
slightly more slender, with narrower pro- 
thoracic margins ( which distinguish it also 
from hollandia), and with distinct elytral 
microsculpture. 

Demetrida dobodura n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in moda and similis but slightly 
more slender; brown (not dark), elytra not 
or not much darker; not pubescent, reticu- 
late microsculpture visible ( light or faint ) 
only on elytra, surface (except of elytra) 
not much punctulate. Head 0.98 and 0.96 
width prothorax; eyes prominent, genae 
short, oblique. Prothorax subquadrate; 
width/length 1.11 and 1.12; base/apex 1.34 
and 1.30; base/head 0.95 and 0.96; sides 
weakly irregularly arcuate in % or more of 
length, weakly sinuate before c. right but 



blunted posterior angles; margins narrower 
than in moda and .similis, each with seta at 
or slightly before middle but none at base; 
surface weakly punctate across base and in 
margins. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 
l.ScS and 1.87; apices with moderate spines, 
outer angles acutely denticulate (or right 
but sharply formed in some individuals 
listed under Additional material), sutural 
angles blunted-obtuse; striae moderately im- 
pressed, finely punctulate; intervals slightly 
convex, punctulate, 3rd with 2 dorsal punc- 
tures. Cdans with c. 5 teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: i tarsi as genus; i 
middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate (3 or 4 
\\'ell spaced small tubercles ) ; S with 2 or 
3, 9 5 to 7 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements: length 7.7-9.2; width 2.6- 
3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,464) and 21 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
9 paratypes, Kokoda, Papua, 1200 ft. (366 
m), Aug., Sept. 1933 (Gheesman). 

Additional material. Papua: 1, Kiunga, 
Fly R., Aug. 8-10, 1957 (^^^ \\'. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.); 1, Koitaki, 1500 ft. (c. 450 
m), Oct.-Nov. 1928 (Pemberton, H.S.P.A.). 
N-E. N. G.: 1, Pindiu, Huon Pen., 500-600 
m, Apr. 19, 1963 (Sedlaeek). Also 1 old 
specimen, i , labeled "New Guinea. Sayer," 
"probably N. gen. near Euproctus," and 
"Gen. probably near Gtenodactylus" (the 
last 2 labels probably by Andrewes ) . 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. Among other brown, spined 
Demetrida. this should be recognizable by 
prothorax subquadrate c. wide as head and 
slightly wider than long by measurement, 
by the rather large size, and the 2-punctate 
3rd elytral intervals. See also Notes under 
following species (kiunga). 

The specimens listed under Additional 
material are doubtfully identified. D. 
dobodura is therefore known with certainty 
only from Dobodura and Kokoda, in 
Papua. 



166 BiilJctin Mu-scmn of Companitive Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Demefrida kiunga n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. of preceding (dohocJum) but 
larger; reddish brown, elytra slightly but 
not much darker; not pubescent, reticulate 
microsculpture distinct only on elytra, sur- 
face not much punctulate. Head 1.04 
and 1.00 \\idth prothorax; eyes moderately 
prominent, genae shorter and oblique. 
Pmtliorax subquadrate; width length 1.00 
and 1.02; base/apex 1.31 and 1.24; base/ 
head 0.90 and 0.89; sides very weakly 
arcuate anteriorly, slightly subangulate at 
setae, strongly sinuate well before slightly 
acute sometimes slightly blunted basal 
angles; margins rather narrow, each with 
seta at or before middle but none at base; 
disc slightly irregular or subpunctate at base 
and in margins. Elytra long; width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.87 and 1.80; apices long-spined, 
outer angles c. right and sharply formed 
but not denticulate, sutural angles obtuse; 
striae impressed, faintly punctulate; inter- 
\als slightly convex, 3rd 2-punctate. Claws 
with c. 7 teeth. Secondanj sexual ehar- 
aeters: S tarsi as genus; c^ middle tibiae 
unmodified, virtually straight, not tubercu- 
late-serrate; i with 3 or 4,9 4 or 5 ( un- 
symmetric in both individuals ) setae each 
side last ventral segment. Measurements: 
lengdi 10.8; width 3.4 mm. 

Tijpes. Holotype <^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 9'paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,465) 
from Kiunga, Fly R., Pajma, Aug. 14-17, 
18-23, 1957 (W. W. Brandt). 

Notes. Among other jilain reddish brown 
Demetrida with (piadrate prothorax and 
spined elytra, this is distinguished by rel- 
atively large si/e, proportions, simple $ 
middle tibiae, and oilier characters given 
in the Key to Species. 

As compared with dohodtira, the present 
species is larg(>r, with longer elytral spines 
but less produc{>d outer elytral angles, as 
well as with differcMit ^ tibiae. The single 
individual of dobodura seen from Kiunga 
is a i with all the characters of dobodura: 
smaller si/.e, denticulate outer elytral angles. 



and plainly tubcrculate-serrate middle 
tibiae. 

Demefrida mafuiu n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 2, figure V; with 
characters of genus; color dimorphic, either 
dark red with prothorax and basal -.-. of 
elytra green with green color extending 
farther back at sides than at suture or 
entirely irregular dark reddish brown, legs 
either dark with paler tarsi or entirely 
brown, antennae brown in both cases; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture pres- 
ent, c. isodiametric on head and elytra and 
transverse on pronotum, surface not much 
punctulate. Head 1.11 and 1.07 width pro- 
thorax; eyes prominent, genae shorter, 
oblique, not prominent; front flattened and 
irregularly slightly impressed before mid- 
dle. Prothorax subquadrate; width length 
0.96 and 0.99; base apex 1.35 and 1.35; 
base/head 0.84 and 0.87; sides weakly 
arcuate for much of length, scarcely angu- 
late at setae, sinuate before prominent c. 
right basal angles; margins narrow, each 
with seta-bearing puncture slighd>' before 
middle but none at base; disc more convex 
than usual, baso-lateral impressions irregu- 
larly punctate. Elytra: width elytra/pro- 
thorax 1.96 and 2.03; apices acutely angu- 
late or dentate, outer angles sharply formed, 
c. right or obtuse, sutural angles obtuse- 
striae well impressed, fineU' punctulate; 
intervals slighth' con\ex, faintl)' sparsely 
punctulate, 3rd 2-punctate. Clatvs \\'ith c. 
6 t(>eth. Secondary sexual characters: $ 
tarsi as genus; S middle tibiae hcut in at 
apex but not tubcrculate-serrate; S with 
4, 9 c. 5 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measuremenis: length 9.3; width 2.9 mm. 
Type. Ilolotvpc $ (British Mus.) from 
Mafuiu, Papua, 4000 ft. (1220 m), Dec. 
1933 (Cheesman); and 1 9 paratype (also 
British Mus.) widi .same data v\cv\A datcnl 
Ian. 1934. 

Notes, (.'omparisoii with direr.sa (p. 
172) suggests that the color dimorphism ot 
nuifulu is simply MeiuU'lian. not sexual. 
These 2 species max l)e related, but mafuUi 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 167 



seems surely distinct ])y form, greater 
convexity of pronotum, and more distinct 
reticulate microsculpture of much of the 
upper surface. The 2 individuals of majuJu 
share these characters and, except in color, 
differ only slightly in other ways: e.g.., 
the 9 has the elytral apices more acutely 
toothed but the outer angles more obtuse. 
The 2 color forms of mafulu are keyed out 
separately in the Keij to Species. 

Demetrido forma n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 104; reddish brown, 
legs testaceous; not pubescent, microsculp- 
ture present ( weak or faint ) only on elytra, 
surface not much punctulate. Head 1.12 
and 1.10 width prothorax; eyes prominent, 
genae short, oblique. Prothorox subquad- 
rate, long; width length 0.99 and 1.01; base 
apex 1.37 and 1.23; base/head 0.82 and 
0.81; sides weakly irregularly rounded 
through much of length, moderately sinu- 
ate posteriorly before c. acute but blunted 
basal angles; margins narrow, each with 
seta-bearing puncture slightly before mid- 
dle but none at base; surface in part ir- 
regular or weakly punctate posteriorly and 
laterally. Elytra rather long; width elytra/ 
prothorax 2.11 and 2.18; apices spined, outer 
angles c. right, sharply formed, sutural 
angles right or slightly obtuse, sometimes 
slightly blunted; striae impressed, weakly 
punctulate; intervals convex, 3rd with 2 
dorsal punctures. Claws with 7 or 8 teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters: S tarsi as 
genus; 6 middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate 
(c. 3 or more tubercles); 6 with 2 or 3, $ c. 
4 apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
ments (type series): length 9.3-9.6; width 
3.1-3.3 mm (specimens listed under Addi- 
tional material 6.8-9.6 mm long). 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) and 
7 paratypes (3 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,466) 
all from Pindiu, Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., 
500-600, 870-1300 m; dates in Apr. 1963 
(holotype, 500-600 m, Apr. 19) (Sedlacek). 

Additional material. Twenty-three speci- 



mens from 9 localities in Papua, N-E. 
rV. G., and eastern West N. G. Because 
of variations (see following Notes) and 
doubtful identifications these specimens 
are not recorded in detail. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. Under this species I have tenta- 
tively placed all nonpubescent, brown, 
pale-legged New Guinean Demetrida with 
spined elytra, prothorax elongate-subquad- 
rate and considerably narrower than head 
( width head prothorax usually but not 
always c. 1.10 or more), and 3rd intervals 
2-punctate ( but see below ) . The specimens 
thus assembled vary considerably in size, 
prominence of eyes, exact form of prothorax, 
and length of elytral spines. Several species 
may be represented but, if so, I cannot 
separate them now. 

Although the 3rd intervals are 2-punctate 
on both elytra in most individuals, in 3 
cases a 3rd (intermediate) puncture is 
present on one side only, and an individual 
from Wau which I tentatively assign to 
forma is 3-punctate on both sides. This 
individual is the only forma (if it is this 
species) seen from Wau. It is a small S 
with tuberculate-serrate middle tibiae. 

Demetrido recto n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as preceding species (forma) except 
elytra short-spined; reddish brown, legs 
pale with dark knees; not pubescent, reticu- 
late microsculpture distinct only on elytra, 
but surface in part finely sparsely punc- 
tulate. Head 1.14 and 1.20 width prothorax; 
eyes prominent, genae shorter, oblique, not 
prominent (but see Notes below). Pro- 
thorax long-quadrate; width length 0.92 
and 0.88; base apex 1.28 and 1.28; base/ 
head 0.85 and 0.84; sides virtually straight 
anteriorly or weakly angulate at setae, 
sinuate well before slightly acute basal 
angles; margins narrow, each with seta 
slightly before middle but none at base; 
baso-lateral impressions weak, subpunctate. 



168 Bulletin Miiscuin of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Elytra: width elytra prothorax 2.14 and 
2.30; apices shoit-.spined or acutely toothed, 
outer angles sharply formed, acute, inner 
angles obtuse; striae impressed, punctulate; 
intervals convex, 3rd 2-punctate. Clows 
with c. 6 or 7 teeth. Secondary .sexual 
characters: 6 tarsi as genus; i middle 
tibiae bent in at apex but not tuberculate- 
serrate; 6 with 3, 9 4 or 5 setae each 
side last ventral segment. Measurements: 
length 8.4-9.7: width 2.7-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
2 9? paratypes (1 in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,467) from Wan, Morobe Dist, N-E. 
N. G., 1200 (liolotypc), 1050, and 1090 m, 
dates in Jan. 1963 (holotype, Jan. 8-10) 
( Sedlacek ) . 

Additional material. West N. G. : 1 c^ , 
Hollandia, May 1945 (Hoogstraal, M.C.Z.). 
Measured sj^ccimens. The J, holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. D. recta resembles forma but is 
distinguished by straighter sides of pro- 
thorax and especially by bent-in but not 
tuberculate-serrate i middle tibiae. D. 
recta may be more closely related to 
l<iun£ia but is smaller, more slender, with 
shorter elytral spines. The real interrela- 
tionships of these and other more or less 
similar species are doubtful. 

Tliis species emphasizes that the ratio 
base/apex of prothorax must be interpreted 
with caution. The ratio of 1.28 in recta 
suggests that the apex is considerably nar- 
rower than the base, and this is true when 
the apex is measured in the standard way, 
between the most advanced points of the 
angles. Nevertheless, the prothorax appears 
\ iitually rectangular. 

Th(> genae of the lK)l<)t\'|)e are unsym- 
metrie: the right one is normal, as de- 
scribed above and as in the other speci- 
mens of the species, wlule the left one is 
subangulate just behind the eye, although 
not so jirominent as in tri})uncfa and 
iS,enicula. This slight angulation of the left 
gena in one specimen only ol recta is 
presumably an abnormality. 



Demetrida rex n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 105; reddish brown; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture faint 
or absent even on elytra, but much of 
upper surface sparsely inconspicuously 
punctulate. Head 1.06 and 1.08 width pro- 
thorax (at middle); eyes prominent, genae 
shorter, oblique. Prothorax trapezoidal, 
wider at base than at middle; width ( at 
middle) length 1.06 and 1.02; base, apex 
1.41 and 1.34; base/width at middle 1.04 
and 1.06; base head 0.98 and 0.98; sides 
shaped as figured, narrowly margined, each 
with seta-bearing puncture at or slightly 
before middle but none at base; surface 
irregularly slightly punctate at base and 
sides. Elytra ample; width elytra prothorax 
(at middle) 2.00 and 2.12; apices spined, 
outer angles acutely denticulate, sutural 
angles obtuse-blunted; striae impressed, 
punctulate; intervals slightly convex, 3rd 
with 3 dorsal punctures (all specimens). 
Claws with 7 or 8 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: 6 tarsi as genus; c5 middle 
tibiae slightly bent-in toward apex but not 
tuberculate-serrate; 6 with 2 or 3, 9 c. 5 
apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
ments: length 10.2-11.4; width 3.5-4.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype i ( Bishop Mus. ) from 
Mokai Village, Torricelli Mts., N-E. N. G., 
750 m, Dec. 8-15, 1958 (^^^ W . Brandt); 
and additional paratypes as follows. N-E. 
N. G.: 1 9, Eliptaniin Vy., 1200-1350 m. 
June 19-30, 1959 (W. \V. Brandt. Bishop 
Mus.); 1 9, Adalbert Mts.. Wanunia, 800- 
1000 m, Oct. 24, 1958 (Gressitt); 1 i , Pin- 
diu, Huon Pen., Apr. 20, 1963 (Sedlacek). 
Papua: 1 i , Dogon, Amazon Ba\ Dist.. 
2400 ft. ( c. 730 m), Oct.-NoN . 1962 (W. W. 
Brandt, C.S.I.H.O.); 1 9, Owen Stanley 
Rge., Ooilala, B()m(\ 1950 m. Apr. 16-30. 
1958 (\\. W. Brandt. Bishop Mus.). (Thc> 
]")aratvpes from Adalbert Mts. and Pindiu 
now in M.C.Z.. Type No. 31,468.) 

Measured specimens. The ■: holotype and 
9 paratype from Eliptamin Valley. 

Notes. Although the 6 speeiinens listi-d 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



169 



above come from 6 different localities, they 
seem to be conspecific and to represent a 
very distinct species, characterized by large 
size, form of prothorax, presence of an 
acute tooth ( almost a short spine ) at outer- 
apical elytral angle, and 3-punctate 3rd 
intervals. See Key to Species for place of 
rex among other New Guinean Demetrida. 

Demefrida brunnea n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form average, with spined elytra; brownish 
testaceous, head and prothorax usually 
slightly darker than elytral disc, legs pale; 
not pubescent, reticulate microsculpture 
visible (light) only on elytra, surface not 
much punctulate. Head 1.12 and 1.13 width 
prothorax; eyes prominent, genae shorter, 
oblique. Prothorax quadrate; width length 
1.02 and 0.99; base/apex 1.23 and 1.26; 
base/head 0.83 and 0.87; sides subparallel 
or weakly irregularly arcuate in anterior % 
or more, subangulate at lateral setae, 
broadly sinuate before right or slightly 
acute posterior angles; margins narrow, 
each with seta at or slightly before middle 
but none at base; surface irregular or 
slightly punctate at base and sides. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 2.06 and 2.14; apices 
spined, outer angles denticulate, sutural 
angles right or slightly obtuse, slightly 
blunted; striae impressed, faintly punctu- 
late; intervals slightly convex, 3rd usually 
3-punctate. Claws with c. 6 teeth. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters: 6 tarsi as genus; 
6 middle tibiae slightly bent in at apex but 
not tuberculate-serrate (Fig. 161); 6 with 
usually 3, 9 5 or 6 apical ventral setae each 
side. Measurements: length 8.5-10.0; width 
2.9-3.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (British Mus.) and 
8 paratypes (3 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,469) 
from Mt. Baduri, Japen Is., West N. G., 
1000 ft. (305 m), Aug. 1938 (Cheesman); 
and the following additional paratypes 
from West N. G.: 1, R. Manai-Undei, 
Japen Is., 500 ft. (c. 150 m), Oct. 1938 
(Cheesman); 3, Mt. Lina, Cvclops Mts., 
3500-4500 ft. (c. 1070-1370 mj, Mar. 1936 



(Cheesman); 6, Sibil, Star Rge., 1260 m, 
dates in May, June 1959 ( Neth. N. G. Exp., 
Leiden Mus.), at hght; 2, Sibil Vy., Star 
Mts., 1245 m, Oct. 18-Nov. 8, 1961 (S. 
Quate, Bishop Mus.); 1, Bivak 36, Star 
Rge., 1220 m, July 29, 1959 (Neth. N. G. 
Exp., Leiden Mus.). 

Additional material N-E. N. G.: 2, 
Eliptamin Vy., 1200-1350 m, June 19-30, 
Aug. 1-15, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.); 1, Feramin, 1200-1500 m, June 1-6, 
1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Pindiu, Huon Pen., 1200-1450 m, Apr. 18, 
1963 (Sedlacek). Papua: 3, Mafulu, 4000 
ft. (c. 1220 m), Jan. 1934 (Cheesman); 1, 
\\'akaiuna, Sewa Bay, Normanbv Is., Dec. 
11-20, 1956 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Japen Is. 

Notes. D. brunnea resembles forma in 
most key characters, but brunnea has oviter 
apical elytral angles acutely denticulate (c. 
right in forma), 3rd intervals usually 3- 
punctate (2-punctate in forma), and S 
middle tibiae slightly bent-in but not 
tuberculate-serrate as in forma. 

Actually, the punctures of the 3rd inter- 
vals vary slightly. Two individuals of 
brunnea (the holotype and the paratype 
horn Bi\ak 36) have 3 punctures on one 
and 2 on the other side, although all other 
brunnea listed above are 3-punctate on 
both sides. 

Demetrida fumipes n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 2, figure VI; with 
characters of genus; form slender, with 
prominent eyes and short-spined elytra; 
reddish brown, elytra ± paler on disc but 
with sides behind humeri blackish, legs 
pale with outer edges of tibiae and apices 
of femora dark or legs more extensively 
dark; not pubescent, reticulate microsculp- 
ture faint or light even on elytra, surface 
not much punctulate. Head 1.12 and 1.18 
width prothorax; eyes prominent, genae 
shorter and not prominent. Prothorax 
quadrate; width length 1.05 and 0.99; base/ 
apex 1.21 and 1.17; base/head 0.83 and 



170 Biilletin Museum of Companitive Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



0.82; sides almost straight or weakly arcuate 
in anterior %, sinuate before c. right but 
irregular basal angles; margins narrow, each 
with seta-bearing puncture before middle, 
none at base; surface scarcely punctate 
even baso-laterally. Ehjtiri: width elytra 
prothorax 2.07 and 2.26; apices short-spined, 
outer angles acute, sutural angles slightly 
blunted; striae impressed, slightly punc- 
tulate; intervals slightly convex, faintly 
sparsely punctulate, 3rd usually 3-punctate. 
Claws with c. 5 or 6 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: i tarsi as genus; 6 middle 
tibiae slightly bent-in at apex but not 
tuberculate-serrate; 6 with 2 or 3, 9 4-6 
apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
ments: length 8.3-9.4; width 2.7-3.2 mm. 

Tifpes. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
17 paratypes (6 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,470) 
all from Wan and vicinity (including Mt. 
Missim), Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., alti- 
tudes from 1100 to 1500-1900 m, dates in 
Feb., Mar., Apr., July, Sept., Nov., 1961- 
1963 (holotype, Wan, 1200-1300 m, Apr. 6, 
1963) (Sedlaceks). 

Additional material. Papua: 3, Doveta, 
Amazon Bay Dist., 2400 ft. (730 m), Aug. 
1962 (W. W. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). N-E. 
N. G.: 1 teneral, Wau, 1200 m, Sept. 2, 
1961 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Wau. 

Notes. Among species that are not ob- 
viously bicolored, fumipes is closest to 
forma but has legs in jiart darker, sides of 
elytra behind humeri darker, and 3rd in- 
tervals 3-punctate (2-punctate in forma). 
Among bicolored species, fumipes is nearest 
humcraJis but is smaller, witli humeri less 
extensively black. See also comparative 
notes under following species. 

Demefrida veiafa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
lonn as in preceding species (fumi))es); 
reddish brown, disc of elytra ± paler but 
sides ol elytra narrowly blackish behind 
humcMi, legs in part dark (at least darker 
than elytral disc); not pulK\scent, reticulate 



microsculpture faintly indicated on pro- 
notum and sometimes on part of head and 
distinct (but light) on elytra, surface not 
much punctulate. Head 1.14 and 1.08 
width prothorax; eyes prominent, genae 
shorter, not prominent. ProtJiorax quadrate, 
long; width length 0.94 and 1.00; base apex 
1.21 and 1.34; base head 0.84 and 0.88; 
sides weakly irregularly arcuate anteriorly, 
strongly sinuate before right or slightly 
acute basal angles; margins narrow, each 
with seta-bearing puncture before middle 
but none at base; baso-lateral areas irreg- 
ularly subpunctate. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 2.05 and 2.16; apices short-spined 
or acutely toothed, with outer angles ± right 
and sharply defined, sutural angles obtuse 
or slightly rounded; striae impressed, faintly 
punctulate; intervals slightly convex, faintly 
sparsely punctulate, 3rd usually 2-punctate. 
Claws with 5 or 6 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: i tarsi as genus; i middle 
tibiae tuberculate-serrate (c. 6 low tuber- 
cles ) ; S with 3 ( rarely 4 ) , 9 c. 5 setae 
each side last ventral segment. Measure- 
ments: length 8.4-8.8; width 2.7-3.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype i ( Bishop Mus. ) from 
Saidor, Kiambavi Village, Finisterre Rge., 
N-E. N. G., July 22-29, 1958 (W. \\\ 
Brandt ) , and 9 paratypes from Finisterre 
Rge. (3 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,471) as 
follows: 1, same data as holotype except 
Aug. 1-28; 7, Saidor, Ahitoko (N'illage), 
Aug. 29-Sept. 5, Sept. 6-24, 1958 (all col- 
lected by W. W. Brandt). 

Measured specimens. The i holot>pi' and 
1 9 paratype from Matoko Village. 

Notes. This apparent relati\c> of fornui 
is distinguished from the latter b\- dark 
elytral edges and daik legs and from 
fumipes b\' usualK 2-punctate rather than 
3-punctate 3rd intervals, and celata differs 
from th(\se and from other similar species 
also in Inning ic'ticiilate microsculpture 
N'isible, although hiint, on pronotum (and 
sometimes part ol head ) as well as elytra. 
D. veldid may be more closely related to 
diversa but is less distinctK bicolored and 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



171 



more distinctly microreticulate, w ith usually 
better developed (but still short) elytral 
spines. 

The 3rd intervals are 2-punctatc on both 
sides of all individuals except that an extra 
(3rd) puncture is present on one side only 
in two individuals. 

One specimen of the type series has 
moth scales stuck to it and is presumably 
from light-trap material. 

Demefrida nigripes n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 106; head and prothorax 
red, elytra black, legs and antennae exten- 
sively dark with pale bases, tarsi paler; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture virtu- 
ally absent in i , present (moderateh' 
transverse ) on elytra in 9 , surface not 
much punctulate. Head 0.98 and 0.94 width 
prothorax; eyes prominent, genae shorter 
and oblique. Prothorax cordate-subquad- 
rate; width length 1.20 and 1.28; base/apex 
1.39 and 1.34; base head 0.94 and 0.98; 
sides broadly slightly irregularly arcuate in 
more than anterior n, moderateh' sinuate 
before e. right posterior angles; margins 
rather wide, each with seta-bearing punc- 
ture slightly before middle but none at 
base; disc slightly punctate at sides and 
base. Elytra parallel; \\'idth elytra pro- 
thorax 1.77 and 1.71; apices with short 
spines, outer angles well defined but 
slightly obtuse, sutural angles obtuse- 
blunted; striae less impressed but more 
punctulate than usual; intervals slightly or 
not convex, 3rd with 3 dorsal punctures 
(middle puncture sometimes doubtful). 
Claics with 5 teeth. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: i tarsi as genus; 6 middle tibiae 
tuberculate-serrate (3 or 4 rounded tuber- 
cles); 6 with 2, 9 3 apical ventral setae 
each side. Measurements: length 7.4-7.7; 
width 2.3-2.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype £ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Swart Vy., Karubaka, N-E. N. G., 1350 m, 
Nov. 18, 1958 (Gressitt); and 1 9 para- 
type (Bishop Mus.), Daradae, nr. Javarere, 



Musgrove R., Papua, 100 m ?, Oct. 2, 
1958 (Gressitt). 

Notes. Although the 2 specimens listed 
above are from different localities, they 
agree in so many ways ( in spite of disagree- 
ment in a few details ) that I feel sure they 
are conspecific and that they represent an 
unusually distinct species, characterized by 
form, color, and relatively light but strongly 
punctulate elytral striae, as well as by other 
characters given in the Key to Species of 
Demetrida of New Guinea. 

Demefrida dorsalis n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 2, figure VII; with 
characters of genus; black, elytra with large 
common red area centered behind middle, 
appendages dark; not pubescent, reticulate 
microsculpture absent or indistinct, but 
parts of upper surface ( especially elytra ) 
sparsely punctulate. Head 0.93 and 0.89 
width prothorax; eyes prominent, genae 
shorter, oblique; front slightly convex, im- 
pressed each side anteriorly, slightly punc- 
tate at middle. ProtJu^rax subcordate; 
width length 1.33 and 1.39; base apex 1.34 
and 1.33; base/head 0.95 and 0.96; sides 
broadly arcuate in more than anterior %, 
strongly sinuate before right or slightly 
acute posterior angles; margins rather wide, 
each with seta-bearing puncture at or 
slightly before middle but none at base; 
surface slightly punctate at base and sides. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.77 and 
1.78; apices angulate, the angulations right 
or slightly acute, outer angles obtuse or 
narrowly rounded, sutural angles obtuse; 
striae well impressed, scarcely punctulate; 
intervals convex, sparsely but distinctly 
punctulate, 3rd with c. 4 dorsal punctures. 
Chiics with c. 5 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: S tarsi as genus (squamae of 
front tarsi disarranged, but probably in 2 
series ) ; S middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate 
(c. 4 low rounded tubercles); S with 2 or 
3, 9 3 or 4 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements: length 6.8-8.2; width 2.7- 
3.1 mm. 



172 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Ti/pes. Holotype S (Bishop Miis.) and 
7 paratypes (3 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,472) 
all from Wau and vicinity (inchiding Mt. 
Missim and Nami Creek), Morobe Dist., 
N-E. N. G., altitudes from 1100 to 1650 
m, dates in Jan., Feb., Mar., 1962, 1963 
(holotype. Wan, 1100 m, Jan. 31, 1963) 
( Sedlacek ) . 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 5 paratype. 

Notes. Although known only from a 
single locality, this species seems a distinct 
on(\ characterized by form, color, angulate 
but not spined elytral apices, and virtual 
absence of dorsal elytral reticulate micro- 
sculpture, as well as by other key char- 
acters. 

Demetrida basalis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form and most characters of duplicata ( p. 
000); red or brown with base of elytra 
(sometimes only humeri) black, legs and 
antennae reddish with part of femora and 
tibiae usually darker; not pubescent, micro- 
sculpture visible (sometimes faint or in- 
distinguishable ) only on elytra, surface in 
part sparsely punctulate. Head 0.93 and 
1.02 width prothorax; eves prominent, genae 
shorter, oblique. Prothorax ({uadrate-sub- 
cordate; width/length 1.21 and 1.17; base/ 
apex 1.36 and 1.30; base ^head 0.92 and 
0.87; sides irregularly arcuate in more than 
anterior 'V\, sometimes subangulate at setae, 
strongly sinuate before c. right or slightly 
acute sometimes slightly blunted posterior 
angles; margins moderately wide, each with 
seta-bearing puncture at or slightly before 
middle but none at base; disc slightK 
punctate across base and in margins. 
Ell/Ira: width elytra/prothoiax 1.S6 and 
2.10; apices spined, outer angles ± right and 
sharply defined, sutmal angles slightly 
obtuse, blunted; striae impressed, scarcely 
punctulat(\ intervals slightly convex, slightly 
punctulate, 3rd with 2 principal and 1 or 2 
intermediate smaller dorsal punctures (all 
specimens). Clans with r. 5 teeth. Sec- 
ondary sexiad chdraclcrs: i tarsi as genus; 



4 middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate (c. 6 
small tubercles); i with 2 or 3, 9 3 (or 
more?) apical ventral setae each side. Mea- 
surements: length 8.4-10.0; width 2.9-3.5 
mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Swart Vv., West N. G., W. ridge, 1800- 
2000 m,^ Nov. 19, 1958 (Gressitt); and 
paratypes as follows. West N. G.: 4(2 in 
M.C.Z., Type No. 31,473), Swart Vy., 
Karubaka, 1500 m, Nov. 11, 20, 1958 (Gres- 
sitt); 2, Wissel Lakes, Kamo Vy., Itouda and 
Moanemani, 1500-1700 m, Aug. 18, 16, 1962 
(Sedlacek); 1, Star Rge., Sibil Vy., 1245 
m, Oct. 18-Nov. 8, 1961 (S. Quate, Bishop 
Mus.); 1, same locality, 1260 m, June 16. 
1959 (Neth. N. G. E.xp., Leiden Mus.), at 
hght; 1, Star Rge., Bivak 39, 1300 m, June 
28, 1959 (Neth. N. G. Exp., Leiden Mus.); 
1 teneral, Araucaria Gamp, 800 m, Apr. 2, 
1939 (Toxopeus). 

Additional material. One teneral, Karu- 
baka, 1450 m, Nov. 16, 1958 (Gressitt), 
light trap. 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Karubaka. 

Notes. This ma>- be a geographic ( west- 
ern ) representatix'e of duplicata ( p. 164 ) 
with elytra black at base rather than en- 
tirely reddish brown (but intermediate 
color fonns occur as noted under duplicata ) 
and with elytra Ic^ss distinctb microreticu- 
late. Its placc^ among other similarly bi- 
colored species is indicated in the Keij to 
Species. 

Demefrida diverso n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 2, figure MIL 
with cliaracters ot genus; lorm slender, 
with prominent eyi's and acutcK angulate 
or short-spined el\ tral apices; color diverse, 
brownish red with either whole base of 
elytra (except suture ) or onl\ humeri either 
black or green (indi\idu;il \ariation), legs 
either entireK' red or almost entiicly black 
(h()lot\pe, basal '.: ol ehtra black, legs 
red); not pubeseint. reticulate microscul]!- 
ture indistinc-t or light rwn on elytra, sur- 
laee not much piuulnlate. Head 1.07 and 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 173 



1.14 width prothorax; eyes prominent, genae 
shorter and obHque. Prothorax subquadrate 
or trapezoidal with base varying from nar- 
rower than to wider than widtli at middle; 
width (at middle) length 1.04 and 0.95; 
base apex 1.39 and 1.46; base head 0.88 
and 0.94; sides weakly irregularly arcuate 
in c. anterior %, sinuate before c. right or 
acute but blunted or narrowly rounded 
posterior angles; margins rather narrow, 
each with seta-bearing puncture before mid- 
dle but none at base; surface irregularly 
punctate basally and in margins. Elytra: 
width elytra/ prothorax (at middle) 1.97 
and 2.25; apices with slightly obtuse or 
acute angulations or very short spines, 
outer angles well defined but varying from 
slightly obtuse to acute, sutural angles 
obtuse; striae moderately impressed, slightly 
punctulate; intervals slightly convex, 3rd 
usually 2- sometimes 3-punctate ( see Notes, 
below). Claws with c. 5 or 6 teeth. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters: 6 tarsi as genus; 
S middle tibiae tuberculate-serrate (c. 7 
small tubercles); 6 with 2 or 3, 9 4 or 
more apical ventral setae each side. Mea- 
surements: length 7.5-9.5; width 2.7-3.3 
mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
27 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,474) all from Wau and vicinity (in- 
cluding Mt. Missim), Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G., altitudes from 1090 to 1700 m, dates 
in Jan., Feb., Mar., May, June, July, Sept., 
Oct., Nov. 1961-1963 (holotype, 1250 m. 
May 3, 1963) (Sedlaceks). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 3, 
Eliptamin Vy., 1200-1350, 1665-2530 m, 
June 23-30, July 1-15. 16-31, 1959 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Korop, Upper 
Jimmi Vy., 1300 m, July 12, 1955 (Gres- 
sitt), in light trap; 1, Swart Vy., Karubaka, 
1550 m, Nov. 8, 1958 (Gressitt, No. 3145); 
1, Jim(m)i R., E. Highlands, July-Sept. 
1961 (W. W.Brandt, G.S.I.R.O.). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. The series from Wau shows the 
entire range of variation indicated in the 



preceding Description. Occurrence together 
of such diverse individuals in what seems 
to be one population suggests Mendelian 
dimorphism of color (elytral bases black 
or green, legs red or black ) , and exceptional 
genetic variation of some other characters. 
The different characters vary indepen- 
dently. For example, leg color is not cor- 
related with color or extent of basal elytral 
marks. Of the type series, 15 individuals 
have 2 punctures on each 3rd interval, 4 
(including the holotype) have 2 on one 
side and 3 on the other, and 2 individuals 
have 3 punctures on each side. 

For distinguishing characters of diversa 
see the Key to Species of Demetrida of New 
Guinea. 

Demetrida vigil n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 107; head and prothorax 
brownish red, elytra red with basal V.\ 
black, antennae red, legs mainly black; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture faint 
and irregular even on elytra in i ( possibU' 
more distinct in 9 ), surface not much 
punctulate. Head 1.03 width prothorax; 
eyes not larger than usual but exceptionally 
abruptly prominent, joining neck posteriorly 
with virtually no genae. Vrothorax long- 
quadrate with anterior angles virtually ob- 
literated; width/ length 0.99; base/apex 1.39; 
base/head 0.91; sides weakly arcuate, 
sinuate before c. right basal angles; margins 
narrow, each with seta-bearing puncture 
at or slightly before middle (an extra ad- 
ventitious puncture on left) but none at 
base; disc very convex, slightly rugulose 
and punctulate especially in baso-lateral 
depressions. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.92; apices spined, outer angles acute- 
denticulate, sutural angles obtuse-blunted; 
striae slightly impressed, faintly punctulate; 
intervals slightly convex, 3rd 2-punctate. 
Claus with 4 or 5 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: 6 tarsi as genus; S middle 
tibiae weakly tuberculate-serrate (c. 4 low 
tubercles); c^ with 3 apical ventral setae 



174 Bulletin Muscidu of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



each side; 9 unknown. Mcasiiiements: 
length 7.8; width 2.5 mm. 

Type. Holotype S (C.S.I.R.O., Can- 
berra) from Doveta, Amazon Bay Dist., 
SE. Papua, 2400 ft. (c. 730 m), Aug. 1962 
(W. W. Brandt); the type is unique. 

Notes. The eyes, more abruptly promi- 
nent than in anv other Denietrida that I 
know, distinguish vigil from such similarly 
colored species as diversa and divisa. 

Demefrido nigriceps n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 10(S ) e. average, with prominent 
but not abrupt eyes, rather narrow pro- 
thorax, and spined elytra; head and pro- 
thorax black, elytra entirely brown, ap- 
pendages brown with antennae darker 
outwardly; not pubescent, microsculpture 
indicated (faint and irregular) on elytra 
only. Head 0.96 and 1.01 width prothorax; 
eyes prominent, genae shorter, oblique. 
Prothorax subquadrate, long, with base 
sometimes wider than middle; width length 
0.96 and 1.01; base/apex 1.30 and 1.30; base/ 
head 0.(S9 and 0.85; sides subparallel in ante- 
rior 'Yi, faintly angulate at lateral setae, 
broadly sinuate before right or slightly acute 
posterior angles; lateral margins narrow, 
each with seta-bearing puncture at or 
slightly before middle but none at base; sur- 
face scarcely or slightly punctate in luargins. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 2.21 and 
2.14; apices spined, outc-r angles acute 
and subdenticulate, sutural angles obtuse- 
blunted; striae slightly iiupressed, slightly 
pimctulate; intervals scarcely convex, 3rd 
2-punctate. ('lans with 6 or 7 teeth. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters: ', tarsi as genus; 
$ middle tibiae not inodificxl ( r. straight, 
not tuberculate-serrate, in both s|:>ecimens ) ; 
i with 2-4 apical ventral setae each side 
(holotype, 4 on each side; paratype, 2 on 
one side, 3 on other j; v unknown. Mea- 
surements: length e. 10.0; width 3.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 ^'paratypc^ (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,475) 
both Iroin Sibil Vall(>v, Star Mts.. Wrsi 



N. G., 1245 m, Oct. 18-Xov. 8, 1961 (S. 
Quate), the holotype at light, the paratype 
in Malaise trap. 

Notes. The unmodified 6 tibiae distin- 
guish this species among other similar ones, 
and other differential characters are given 
in the Key to Species of Demetrida of New 
Giunea. 

The sex { i S ) of both specimens has 
been determined by dissection as well as 
by examination of the front tarsi. 

Demetrida saidor n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slender, with prominent but not 
abrupt eyes and spined elytra; head and 
prothorax brownish black, elytra brownish 
testaceous with humeri and sometimes en- 
tire base narrowly black, appendages ir- 
regularly dark with paler tarsi; not pubes- 
cent, reticulate microsculpture visible ( faint 
or light) only on elytra, surface not much 
(slightly, finely, sparsely) punctulate. Head 
1.25 and 1.11 width prothorax; eyes promi- 
nent, genae short, oblique. Prothorax long- 
quadrate with relatively wide base; width/ 
length 0.93 and 1.02; base apex 1.43 and 
1.30; base/head 0.85 and 0.88; sides sub- 
parallel or slightly arcuate in c. anterior ^^i, 
sinuate before usually acute but slightly 
blunted posterior angles; margins narrow, 
each \\'ith seta-bearing puncture at or 
slightly before middle but none at base; 
surface slightK' punctate at base and in 
margins. Elytra: width ehtra prothorax 
2.28 and 2.17; apices spined, outer angles 
acute, sharpK defined, sutural angles ob- 
tuse; striae lightK impressed, punctulate; 
intervals I hit or slightK' comcx, 3rd 2- 
punctate (all specimens), the posterior 
puncture fai- back. Clatrs with c. 6-7 teeth. 
Seconchiry sexii(d characters: S tarsi as 
g{>nus; -; middl(> tibiae not or \ery littU^ 
modilied, not bent in at apex and not 
tuberculate-serrate; ,^ with 3, 9 c. 6 apical 
ventral setae each side. Measurements: 
length 8.6-10,0; width 2.8-3.3 mm. 

I'yiics. ?Tolotype S (Bishop Mus.) from 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



175 



Saidor, Matoko Village, Finisterre Rge., 
N-E. N. G., Sept. 6-24, 1958 (W. W. 
Brandt); 1 6 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,476) from Saidor, Kiambavi Village, 
Aug. 1-28, 1958 (W. W. Brandt); 2(69) 
paratypes from Sepalakembang, Salawaket 
Rge., N-E. N. G., 1920 m, Sept. 11-14, 12, 
1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.), in 
light trap. 

Additional material. West N. G.: 1 ten- 
eral 6 , Wissel Lakes, Moanemani, Kamo 
Vy., 1500 m, Aug. 19, 1962 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The c$ holotype and 
the 9 paratype from Sepalakembang. 

Notes. Among more or less similar species 
(fiimipes, velata, nigriccps) this is distin- 
guished by combination of polished ( not 
microreticulate) black head and pronotum, 
black humeri and legs, and simple 6 middle 
tibiae. 

Demefrido divisa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. average, with prominent but not 
abrupt eyes, rather narrow prothorax, 
spined elytra; red or yellowish with basal 
% or V-i of elytra black, lower surface red- 
dish yellow with metepisterna mainly dark, 
legs testaceous with dark knees, antennae 
brown; not pubescent, reticulate micro- 
sculpture distinct (light) only on elytra, 
surface not much punctulate. Head 1.14 
and 1.11 width prothorax; eyes prominent, 
genae oblique and shorter than eyes, some- 
times slightly convex in profile but not 
very prominent. Prothorax quadrate, long; 
width length 0.95 and 0.95; base apex 1.30 
and 1.32; base/head 0.88 and 0.95; sides 
nearly straight (except subangulate at 
setae) in more than anterior ■'4, sinuate 
before c. right or acute, slightly blunted 
posterior angles; margins rather narrow, 
each with seta-bearing puncture before 
middle but none at base; surface vaguely 
subpunctate baso-laterally. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 2.05 and — (elytra spread); 
apices variably spined (spines usually short), 
outer angles sharph' defined, right or acute, 



sutural angles obtuse; striae impressed, 
scarcely punctulate; intervals slightly con- 
vex, sparsely slightly punctulate, 3rd with 
2 or 3 dorsal punctures (see following 
Notes). Claws with c. 7 teeth. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 tarsi as genus; S 
middle tibiae scarcely modified, at most 
slightly bent in at apex, not tuberculate- 
serrate; $ with c. 4, 9 5 or 6 apical ventral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 
9.5-11.5; width 3.1-3.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 <i 'paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,477) 
from Tsenga, Upper Jimmi Vy., N-E. N. G., 
1200 m, July 14, 1955 (Gressitt); and addi- 
tional paratvpes as follows. N-E. N. G.: 2, 
W'au, iMorobe Dist., 1200 m, Sept. 27, 1961, 
May 1-15, 1962 (Sedlacek), in light trap; 
5, Okapa ( Hornabrook ) ; 1, Swart Vy., 
Karubaka, 1300 m, Nov. 7, 1958 (Gressitt); 
1, Sattelberg (British Mus.); Papua: 1, 
Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 m). May 1933 
(Cheesman); 2, Dogon, Amazon Bay Dist., 
2400 ft. {c. 730 m), Sept., Oct.-Nov. 1962 
(W. W. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). West N. G.: 
1 9 , Bomberi, Vogelkop, 700-900 m, June 
5, 1959 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
9 paratype from Sattelberg. 

Notes. D. divisa resembles one of the 
color forms of diver.sa, but divisa is larger, 
with elytra at least short-spined and S 
middle tibiae not tuberculate-serrate as in 
diversa. 

In the 6 holotype and S paratype from 
Tsenga and also the 9 from Bomberi the 
3rd intervals are 2-punctate; in all other 
specimens, 3-punctate; but I find no other 
characters to suggest that this is a specific 
difference. 

The specimen from Sattelberg is labeled 
by Andrewes, "Genus mihi ignotum." 

Demefrida humerolis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. average, with prominent eyes, 
quadrate prothorax, and short-spined elytra; 
reddish brown, humeri black, legs black or 
bicolored; not pubescent, microsculpture 



176 Bulletin Muacuni of Coiup<irativc Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



faint even on elytra, surtace not much 
punctulate. Head 1.07 and l.OS width pro- 
thorax; eyes prominent, genae shorter and 
obHque. ProtJiorax sul)Ciuadrate with rather 
broad base; width length 1.06 and 1.00; 
base /apex 1.33 and 1.23; base/head 0.89 
and 0.90; sides weakly irregularly arcuate, 
usually subangulate at setae, broadly sinu- 
ate before right or slightly acute posterior 
angles; margins rather narrow, each with 
seta-bearing puncture at or before middle 
but none at base; disc subpunctate across 
base and in margins. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.99 and 2.16; apices short-spined. 
outer angles sharply defined, usually dentic- 
ulate, sutural angles c. right or slightly 
ol)tuse; striae moderately impressed, faintly 
punctulate; intervals slightly convex, 3rd 
usually 3-punctate. Claws with 5 or 6 teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters: 6 tarsi as 
genus; i middle tibiae scarcely modified, 
at most slightly bent in at apex but not 
tuberculate-serrate; 6 with 3, 9 c. 6 apical 
ventral setae each side. Measurements: 
length 9.3-10,8; width 3.0-3.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (Bishop Mus.) and 
12 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,478) all from Swart Vy., Karubaka, N-E. 
N. G., 1300 to 1600 m, dates in Nov. 1958 
(holotype, 1300 m, Nov. 7) (Gressitt). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 2, Kas- 
sem, 48 km E. of Kainantu, 1350 m, Nov. 7, 
1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1, Tsenga, 
Upper Jimmi Vy., 1200 m, July 13, 1955 
(Gressitt); 1, Jim(m)i R., E. Highlands, 
Julv-Sept. 1961 (W. W. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). 
West N. G.: 1, Sibil, Star Rge., 1260 in. 
May 24, 1959 (Neth. N. G. Exp., Leiden 
Mus. ) . 

Mea.sured s])eciniens. The •; holot\pc and 
1 9 paratyjie from Karubaka. 

Notes. P. huntcralis differs Irom the 
preceding species (divisa) i)riucipall\ in 
color, having less black on eUlral bas(>s 
but darker legs. It is close also to fut)ti))es 
but is larger and more lu>a\ily marked. 
The interr(4ationships ol these forms are 
still not clear. 

The 3rd inter\als are usually .3-punetate 



in humeralis but are only 2-punctate in the 
indixidual from Sibil. 

Demefrida imitafrix n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 3, figure IX; with 
characters of genus; relatively wide; dark 
blue-black with dark appendages; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture absent 
or faint, but surface finely sparsely punc- 
tulate. Head 0.84 and 0.88 width prothorax; 
eyes prominent, genae much shorter and 
oblicpie. Frothorax subcordate; width 
length 1.39 and 1.36; base apex 1.36 and 
1.40; base head 1.02 and 1.02; sides 
broadly slightly irregularly rounded an- 
teriorly, strongly sinuate before c. right 
slightly l)lunted posterior angles; margins 
moderately wide, each with seta-bearing 
puncture at or slightly before middle but 
none at base; disc subpunctate baso-later- 
ally. Elytra short and wide; width ebtra 
prothorax 1.74 and 1.80; apices spined, outer 
angles obtuse or blunted, sutural angles 
obtusely blunted; striae impressed, slighth' 
or scarcely punctulate; intervals nearly flat 
or slightly convex, 3rd 2-punctate. Claics 
with 4 or 5 teeth. Secondary sexual cliar- 
acters: 6 tarsi as genus; o middle tibiae 
with inner edge swollen or thickened before 
apex, the swollen portion separated from 
the apex b\' a broad emargination; i with 
2 or 3, 9 c. 4 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements: length 7.4-8.5; width 3.0- 
3.5 mm. 

Types. IIolotN'iie i (Bishop Mus.) from 
Karimui, S. of Goroka, N-E. N. (i., 1000 m, 
Inne 2, 1961 (Gressitt), taken in light trap; 
and paratopes as follows. Papua: 1 broken 
V, Dobodura, Mar.-Jul\ 1944 (Darlington) 
(M.G.Z., Type No." 31,479), taken on a 
lighted window; 1, Kokoda, 1200 ft. (366 
m), Aug. 1933 (Gheesman); 1. Dogon, 
Amazon Bay Dist., 2400 ft. ( r. 730 m). 
Sept. 1962 (W. W. Brandt, C;.S.1.R.(). ); 1, 
Misima Is., No\ . 1963 (\V. \V. Brandt, 
C:.S.I.R.O.). West N. <;.: 1. Gamp 2, 
Sabron. Gyclops Mts., 2000 ft. (610 m), 
|nl\ 1936 ((>heesman). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



177 



Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
the 9 paratype from Dogon. 

Notes. Among the New Guinean species 
of Demetricla, this one is unique in its 
broad form and in form of i tibiae. Never- 
theless it has the essential characters of 
Demetrida and I do not think it should be 
separated from that genus, at least not 
unless the genus as a whole is divided. 

Superficially, D. imitatrix resembles Vio- 
higonum violaceiim (Chaudoir), which 
is very common at low altitudes in New 
Guinea. This may be an example of 
Batesian mimicry. 

Demefrida viridipennis n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 3, figure X; with 
characters of genus; not pubescent; head 
and prothorax red, elytra bright green usu- 
ally shading to purple toward apex, ap- 
pendages reddish yellow; reticulate micro- 
sculpture visible ( light ) only on elytra, but 
surface in part slightly sparsely punctu- 
late. Head 1.08 and 1.11 width prothorax; 
eyes moderately prominent, genae shorter 
and oblique, not prominent. Prothorax 
subquadrate; width length 1.08 and 1.03; 
base/ apex 1.32 and 1.31; base head 0.88 
and 0.86; basal angles c. right, c. blunted; 
margins rather narro\\', each \\\i\\ seta near 
or slightly liefore middle but none at base; 
disc subpunctate across base and in margins. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.99 and 
2.17 (latter spread by pin?); apices spined, 
outer angles sharply defined, c. right ( some- 
what variable), sutural angles obtuse; striae 
deeply impressed, slightly punctulate; in- 
tervals slightly convex, faintly punctulate, 
3rd with 2 dorsal punctures. Claws with c. 
5 teeth. Secondary sexual characters: S 
tarsi as genus; c^ middle tibiae tuberculate- 
serrate (c. 6 low tubercles); c5 with 2, $ 
3 setae each side last ventral segment. 
Measurements: length 6.9-8.5; width 2.5- 
3.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1200-1300 
m. Mar. 14, 1963 (Sedlacek); and para- 
types (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,480) 



as follows. N-E. N. G.: 4, Wau, 1200, 
1220-1250, 1300 m, Nov. 12, 1961, Feb. 11, 
Jan. 23, 1963, Oct. 14, 1965 (Sedlaceks); 
1, Bulolo (near Wau), 1005 m, Aug. 25, 
1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Mt. Missim, 1600-2000 m, Sept. 21-24, 1964 
(M. Sedlacek); 1, Karimui, 1080 m, Julv 
14-15, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, Okapa, Apr. 19, 
1965 ( Hornabrook ) ; 1, Kainantu, July 9 
(Sedlaceks); 1, \\\un. Upper Jimmi Valley, 
840 m, July 17, 1955 (Gressitt); 1, Finis- 
terre Rge., Saidor, Funvende, 1200 m, Sept. 
24-30, 1958 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 
1, Adalbert Mts., Wanuma, 800-1000 m, 
Oct. 26, 1958 (Gressitt). Papua: 1, Ko- 
koda, .200 ft. (366 m), June 1933 
(Cheesman); 2, Owen Stanley Rge., Goilala 
(Loloipa, Nov. 25-Dec. 10^ and Tapini, 
975 m, Nov. 16-25, 1957) (W. W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.); 1, Mt. Lamington, 1300- 
1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m) (C. T. McNamara, 
S. Australian Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Wau. 

Notes. Form, color, and deep elytral 
striae set this distinct species off from all 
others of the genus kno\\'n to me. It is 
evidently widely distributed in at least the 
eastern half of New Guinea at moderate 
altitudes. 

Demetrido lepida n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 3, figure XI; with 
characters of genus; head and prothorax 
black, elytra green-purple (variable, often 
more green to\\'ard base and more purple 
toward apex, sometimes slightly reddish on 
disc), appendages dark; not pubescent, 
reticulate microsculpture faint even on 
elytra, surface not much punctulate. Head 
1.24 and 1.12 width prothorax; eyes rather 
abruptly prominent, genae c. long as eyes, 
slightK' convex in outline but not very 
prominent; front wide, irregularly flattened 
and impressed or subpunctate at middle. 
Prothorax subquadrate; width length 0.95 
and 1.05; base apex 1.30 and 1.22; base/ 
head 0.74 and 0.77; sides arcuate anteriorly, 
sinuate before c. right but blunted or nar- 



178 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



rowly rounded posterior angles; margins 
narrow, each with seta-bearing puncture at 
or shghtly before middle but none at base; 
disc convex, baso-lateral impressions almost 
obsolete, surface faintly subpunctate across 
base and in margins. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax — (elytra spread) and 1.95; apices 
long-spined, outer angles acute or denticu- 
late, sutural angles obtuse; striae lightly 
impressed, lightly punctulate; intervals flat 
or slightly convex, .3rd 3-punctate. Claws 
with c. 7 teeth. Secondary sexual char- 
acters: S tarsi as genus; S middle tibiae 
slightly tuberculate-serrate {c. 4 spaced 
tubercles); S with 3, 9 4-6 apical ventral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 
9.2-10.8; width 3.0-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 ( Bi.shop Mus. ) and 
10 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,-1(S1) from Swart Vy., Karubaka, N-E. 
N. G., altitudes from 1300 to 1600 m, dates 
in Nov. 1958 (holotype, 1450 m, Nov. 12) 
(Gressitt); and additional paratypes as 
follows. West N. G.: 17, Wissel Lakes, 
Enarotadi, altitudes from 1750 to 1900 m, 
dates in July, Aug. 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, 
W'isscl Lakes, Itouda, Kamo Vv., 1500-1700 
m, Aug. 18, 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, Wissel 
Lakes, Kamo-Debei div., 1700 m, Aug. 13, 
1955 (Gressitt); 1, Lower Mist Camp, 
1700 m, Jan. 17, 1939 (Toxopeus). Papua: 
1, Owen StanlcN' Hge., Goilala, Loloipa, 
Feb. 1-15, 1958' (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.). 

Measured specimens. A 6 paratype from 
Swart Valley and the 9 holotype. 

Notes. The bright color, rather abruptly 
prominent eyes, and long elytral spines 
characterize this fine species. It appears to 
be widely distributed in New Guinea at 
moderate altitudes. Ot the 19 specimens 
seen, only 3 are i $ . 

Two Karubaka individuals and one from 
JMiarotadi are labe](>(l as taken in light 
traps. 

Demefrida sublepida n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form r. as in preceding species {lepida) 



but eyes less abruptly prominent and elytral 
spines shorter; head and prothorax green, 
elytra green-purple (variable); appendages 
dark, tarsi paler; not pubescent, reticulate 
microsculpture visible (faint) only on elytra, 
surface not much punctulate. Head 1.16 
and 1.11 width prothorax; eyes prominent 
but not abrupt, genae shorter and oblique. 
Prothorax subquadrate; width length 1.01 
and 1.03; base apex 1.20 and 1.18; base/ 
head 0.80 and 0.86; sides weakly slightly 
irregularly arcuate in more than anterior 
■'4, usuallv stronglv sinuate before usuallv 
acute posterior angles; margins narrow, each 
with seta-bearing puncture slightly before 
middle but none at base; baso-lateral im- 
pressions subobsolete, disc slightly trans- 
versely wrinkled, vaguely subpunctate 
across base and in margins. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 2.11 and 2.19; apices 
spined, outer angles c. right or obtuse, 
sutural angles obtuse; striae well impressed, 
scarcely punctulate; intervals convex, finely 
sparsely punctulate, 3rd 2-punctate. Cdaws 
with 5 or 6 teeth. Secondary sexual cJiar- 
acters: i unknown; 9 with 3 or 4 apical 
ventral setae each side last ventral segment. 
Measurenients: length 7.0-9.0; width 2.5- 
3.1 mm. 

Tyj)es. Holotype 9 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wissel Lakes, Enarotadi, West N. G., 1850 
m, Aug. 1, 1962 (Sedlacek); and addi- 
tional paratypes as follows. West N. (i.: 7 
(some in \LC.Z., Type Xo. 31,482), Enaro- 
tadi, 1750 to 1900 m, dates in July, Aug. 
1962 (Sedlacek); 1, Wissel Lakes, IVapura, 
Kamo Vv., 1530 m, Aug. 11, 1955 (Gressitt). 
N-E. N.'g.: 1, Swart Vy., Karul)aka, 1300 
m, Nov. 7, 1958 (Gressitt); 1, Wan, Morobe 
Hist., 1.300 m. June 15, 1961 (Gressitt), 
on Pii:)turus. All specimens are 9 9 . 

Meastircd six'cinwns. Tlu' 9 holotxpe and 
9 paratype from Enarotadi. 

Soles. Although perhaps related to the 
preceding spc^cies (lepida), sid)lcpid(i differs 
in a surjirising number ol characters in- 
cluding less abrupt eyes, head and pro- 
notum green rather tlian black. el\ tral 
spines slioitei-, elytial striae deeper, claws 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 179 



with fewer teeth, and size smaller. These 
species evidently occur together at some 
localities, and they may be involved in some 
sort of mimicry. 

Demetrida viridibasis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slender, with ± prominent eyes and 
short-spined elytra; red, c. basal Va of elytra 
bright green with the green color extending 
back more at sides than at middle, femora 
and parts of tibiae dark; not pubescent, 
reticulate microsculpture usually visible 
(but light) on front of head and on pro- 
notum as well as on elytra, much of upper 
surface also sparsely finely punctulate. 
Head 1.05 and 1.02 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent, genae c. long as eyes and 
slightly convex in outline but not very 
prominent. Frothorax subquadrate, long; 
width/length 1.00 and 1.09; base/apex 1.25 
and 1.23; base/head 0.85 and 0.85; sides 
nearly straight for much of length except 
slightly subangulate at setae, broadly sinu- 
ate before c. right slightly blunted posterior 
angles; margins narrow, each with seta- 
bearing puncture slightly before middle but 
none at base; disc less convex and with 
more distinct baso-lateral impressions than 
in k'pida and suhJepida, subpunctate across 
base and in margins. Elytra moderately 
long; width elytra prothorax 1.98 and 1.86; 
apices short-spined, outer angles c. right, 
sharply formed, sutural angles obtuse; striae 
impressed, faintly punctulate; intervals con- 
vex, 3rd 3-punctate. Cdaics with c. 5 teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters: i see Notes, 
below; 9 with 5 or more apical ventral 
setae each side. Measurements: length 
8.5-10.3; width 2.9-3.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (C.S.I.R.O., Can- 
berra ) from Dogon, Amazon Bay Dist., SE. 
Papua, 2400 ft. (c. 730 m), ^Sept. 1962 
(W . \V. Brandt); 1 9 paratype (C.S.I.R.O.) 
with same data except collected Oct.-Nov.; 
1 9 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,483), 
Doveta, Amazon Bay Dist., 2400 ft. (c. 730 
m), Aug. 1962 (W. W. Brandt). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 3, 



Swart Vy., Karubaka, 1300, 1500 m, Nov. 7, 
11, 20, 1958 (Gressitt); 1, Finisterre Rge., 
Saidor, Kiambavi Village, Aug. 1-28, 1958 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). West N. G.: 
1, Cyclops Mts., 3400-4500 ft. (c. 1040- 
1370 m). Mar. 1936 (Cheesman). 

Measured specimens. The 9 holotype and 
9 paratype from Doveta. 

Notes. This species seems close to the 
green-marked form of diversa but has 
longer elytral spines. Some specimens 
listed under Additional material are doubt- 
fully identified. Most are 9 9 ; the only S , 
from Swart \'y., has middle tibiae slightly 
bent in toward apex but not tuberculate- 
serrate, and c. 4 apical ventral setae each 
side. 

Demetrida sibil n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slender, with prominent eyes and 
spined elytra; head, prothorax, and c. basal 
Vi of elytra dark greenish, the dark color 
extending farther back at sides of elytra 
than at middle, and suture sometimes red 
almost to base, rest of elytra red, femora 
and outer edges of tibiae greenish black, 
antennae brown, lo^^'er surface greenish 
black in anterior half, abdomen red; not 
pubescent, reticulate microsculpture faint 
even on elvtra. Head 1.19 and 1.10 width 
prothorax; eyes moderately abruptly promi- 
nent, genae nearly as long as eyes, oblique; 
front flattened, irregularly slightly im- 
pressed and subpunctate at middle. Pro- 
thorax subquadrate; width length 0.94 and 
0.98; base apex 1.38 and 1.28; base head 
0.81 and 0.82; sides weakly irregularly 
arcuate for much of length, rather abruptly 
sinuate before right or slightly acute some- 
times slightly blunted posterior angles; 
margins narrow, each with seta-bearing 
puncture slightly before middle but none at 
base; disc strongly convex, with baso-lat- 
eral impressions weakly indicated, surface 
slightly punctate across base and in margins. 
Ehjtra: width elytra/ prothorax 2.09 and 
1.98; apices spined, outer angles acute or 
denticulate, sutural angles obtuse; striae 



180 Bulletin Museum of Co7y}parative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



moderately impressed, finely punetulate; in- 
tervals slightly convex, very sparsely in- 
conspicuously punetulate, 3rd 3-punctate 
(except intermediate puncture lacking on 1 
side in 1 paratype). CAciws with c. 6 teeth. 
Secondary sexual character: 6 tarsi as 
genus; 6 middle tibiae bent-in at apex but 
not tuberculate-serrate; c5 with apparently 
4, 9 c. 8 or 9 apical ventral setae each side. 
Measurements: length 9.4-10.8; width 3.0- 
3.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (Leiden Mus.) and 5 
paratypes (2 hi M.C.Z., Type No. 31,484) 
from Sibil, Star Rge., West N. G., 1260 m, 
dates in May and June, 1959 (holotype, 
June 17) (Neth. New Guinea Exp.), taken 
at light; and additional paratypes as fol- 
lows. West N. G. : 2, preceding locality 
("Star Mts. Sibil Val."), 1245 m, Oct. 18- 
Nov. 8, 1961 (S. Quate, Bishop Mus.), at 
light. N-E. N. G.: 1, Feramin, 1200-1500 
m, June 15-18, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Sibil. 

Notes. The color (head and pronotum as 
well as elytra! bases green ) and long-spined 
elytra distinguish this from other species of 
the diversa complex. 

Demetrida seticollis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 109; brown, with head 
and prothorax and sometimes base of elytra 
slightly darker; appendages brown; not 
pubescent, reticulate inicrosculpture visible 
(but very light) only on elytra. Head 1.20 
and 1.19 width prothorax; eyes \('r\' promi- 
nent, genae {)bli(|ue and not sharply distinct 
from neck; front irregularly flattened or 
impressed and subpunctate at middle. Pro- 
thorax (piadrate-trapezoidal; width /length 
1.02 and 0.97; base apex 1.45 ;uid 1.29; 
base/head 0.86 and 0.90; sides wcakK 
arcuate or c. straight in "'i or more ol length, 
strongly sinuate beh)re prominent, c. light 
or acute (somewhat varia])le ) basal angles; 
margins narrow, each \\ itli seta before mid- 
dle and at base and additi<)n;il iisualK 



smaller setae anteriorly; disc moderately 
convex, with irregular baso-lateral impres- 
sions, surface irregular or subpunctate 
across base and in margins. Elytra ample; 
width elytra/prothorax 2.20 and 2.22; apices 
long-spined, outer angles acute-denticulate, 
sutural angles obtuse; striae lightly im- 
pressed, finely punetulate; intervals slightly 
convex or c. flat, 3rd 3- or 4-punctate ( vari- 
able, sometimes unsymmetric). Claws with 
6-8 teeth. Secondary sexual characters: $ 
tarsi as genus; i middle tibiae tuberculate- 
serrate ( c. 4 widely sometimes irregularly 
spaced tubercles); 6 with 2-A, 9 c. 6 
apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
ments: length 8.7-10.5; width 2.9-3.4 mm 
( except 1 i from Wissel Lakes, doubtfully 
identified, 11.3 X 3.7 mm). 

Types. Holotvpe 6 ( Bishop Mus. ) from 
Wissel Lakes, Enarotadi, West N. G., 1900 
m, Aug. 21, 1955 (Gressitt); 61 paratypes 
(some in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,485) from 
the Wissel Lakes area (Enarotadi, Moane- 
mane, Itouda, Urapura, Okaitadi, "Paniai- 
Kamo div."), 1500-2050 m, dates in Jul\-, 
Aug., 1955, 1962 (Gressitt, Sedlacek );" and 
4 additional paratvpcs from the same area, 
Arabu Camp, 1800 m, Oct. 7, 8, 12, 17, 
1939 (H. Boschma, Leiden Mus.). 

Additional material. West N. G. : 1 very 
large 6 , data as holot)pe except 1500 m, 
Aug. 14, 1962 (Sedlacek); 2, Juliana Bivak, 
1800 m, Aug. 30, Sept. 5, 1959 (Neth. N. G. 
Exp., Leiden Mus.); 1, Star Rge., Bivak 
39A, 1500 m, July 2, 1959 (Neth. N. G. 
Exp., Leiden Mus.); 1, Swart Vv., \^^ ridge, 
1800-2000 m, Nov. 19, 1958' (Gressitt). 
N-i:. ^, (;.: l, Gewak, Salawaket Hge., 
1530 ni, Sept. 6, 1956 ( E. J. Ford. Jr.. 
Bishop Mus.), in light trap. Papua: 1, 
Owen Stanle\- Hge., Cioilala, Bom(\ 1950 m. 
Mar. 8-15, 1958 ( W. \\ . Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
I 9 paratype from liinarotadi. 

Notes. The extra seta of the prothoracic 
margins antciioily distinguish this species 
hoin all other noiniubescent Demetrida 
known lo ww. These setae aic much 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 181 



stronger and more erect than the fine extra 
marginal hairs of D. seriata and niibicola. 
When the setae are ]:)roken off, or perhaps 
lacking in aberrant individuals, the species 
is still recognizable by form especially of 
prothorax, color, and long elytral spines. 

D. scticoUis apparently ranges widely in 
New Guinea at considerable altitudes (not 
known below 1500 m ) on the higher moun- 
tain ranges. The fact that it has not been 
found on the Morobe Plateau (Wau, etc.) 
is noteworthy. 

Demefrida pollipes n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slender, with moderately prominent 
eyes and strongly spined elytral apices; head 
and pronotum reddish piceous, elytra 
blackish with small discal area usually 
reddish, legs testaceous, antennae brown, 
lower surface dark with metepisterna paler; 
not pubescent, reticulate microsculpture 
absent or indistinct, surface not much punc- 
tulate. Head 1.14 and 1.16 width prothorax; 
eyes prominent, genae shorter, oblique. 
P rot J} o rax subquadratc, long; width length 

1.03 and 0.96; base apex 1.35 and 1.34; 
base/head 0.84 and 0.86; sides very weakly 
arcuate in c. anterior %, strongly sinuate 
before right or acute usually slightly 
blunted posterior angles; margins narrow, 
each with seta-bearing puncture before 
middle and at basal angle; disc with mod- 
erate baso-lateral impressions, scarcely 
punctate. Elytra: width elytra /prothorax 

2.04 and 2.05; apices strongly spined, outer 
angles acute or denticulate, sutural angles 
obtuse; striae lightly impressed, finely ir- 
regularly punctulate; intervals almost flat, 
3rd usually 2-punctate, sometimes 3-punc- 
tate on 1 side. Claws with c. 5 teeth. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters: £ tarsi as genus; 

S middle tibiae weakly tuberculate-serrate 
(c. 4 low tubercles); S with 3, 9 5 or 6 
apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
ments: length 8.4-9.6; width 2.5-2.9 mm. 
Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) and 
19 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 



31,486) from Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G., altitudes from 1100-1500 m, dates 
in Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Sept., Dec, 1961- 
1966 (holotype, 1450 m, Feb. 6, 1963) 
(Sedlacek, 1 paratype T. C. Maa); 1 para- 
type, Mt. Missim,' 1600-2000 m, Sept. 21- 
24, 1964 (M. Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. See Key to Species for place of 
D. pallipes among other New Guinean 
Dcmetrida. 

Demetrido discoidalis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in preceding species i))allipes); 
black, elytra with large elongate common 
red area centered behind middle, lower 
surface and appendages dark; not pubes- 
cent, reticulate microsculpture absent or 
indistinct on elytra, surface not much 
(sparsely inconspicuously) punctulate. Head 
1.06 and 1.13 width prothorax; eyes promi- 
nent, genae shorter, oblique. Frothorax sub- 
quadrate, but anterior angles rounded to 
neck; width length 1.04 and 1.00; base/ 
apex 1.51 and 1.47; base/head 0.90 and 
0.91; sides arcuate through much of length, 
sinuate before c. right slightly blunted pos- 
terior angles; margins narrow, each with 
seta-bearing puncture before middle and at 
base; disc with baso-lateral impressions 
weak, surface slightly irregular or sub- 
punctate across base and in margins. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.91 and 
2.02; apices ( variably ) spined, outer angles 
sharply defined, varying from acute to 
slightly obtuse, sutural angles obtuse; 
striae lightly impressed, punctulate; inter- 
vals flat, 3rd 2-punctate. Claws with 6 or 
7 teeth. Secondary sexual characters: S 
tarsi as genus; 6 middle tibiae tuberculate- 
serrate (c. 4 low rounded tubercles); S 
with 2 or 3, 9 4 or 5 apical ventral setae 
each side. Measurements: length 9.0-11.5; 
width 3.0-3.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Bishop Mus.) from 
Sibii Vy., Star Rge., West N. G., 1245 m, 



182 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Oct. 18-Nov. 8, 1961 (S. & L. Quate), in 
Malaise trap; and paratypes as follows. 
West N. G.: 1, Sibil, Star Rge., 1260 m, 
June 1959; 2, Bivak 36, Star Rge., 1220 m, 
July 28, 1959; 1, Bivak 39A, Star Rge., 
1550 m, July 5, 1959 (these 4 paratypes all 
Neth. N. G. Exp., Leiden Mus.)'. N-E. 
N. G.: 1, Eliptamin Vv., 1665-2530 m, 
June 19, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 
1, Feramin, 1200-1500 m, June 15-18, 1959 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). (Some 
paratypes in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,487. ) 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
9 paratype from Bivak 39A. 

Notes. This may be a geographic repre- 
sentative of the preceding species ( paUipes) 
from which it differs only slightly in form 
but more in color, with larger red area on 
elytra and dark rather than pale legs. It 
resembles dorsaJis in color but differs in 
form (much narrower than dorsaJis), pres- 
ence of posterior-lateral prothoracic setae, 
and in other ways: in fact, these 2 species 
are not closely related. 

Demetrida sedlacekorum n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form slender, c. as in preceding species 
{paUipes, discoidaJis) ])ut elytra short- 
spined; black with bluish tone especially 
on elytra, appendages dark; not pubescent; 
reticulate microsculpturc> absent or indis- 
tinct, but upper surface in part with \er)' 
fine, sparse, inconspicuous punctulation. 
Head 1.14 and 1.08 width prothorax; eyes 
prominent, genae shorter, oblique. Pro- 
thorax subcjuadrate, long, with rathcM- broad 
base; width length 0.98 and 0.99; base apex 
1.41 and 1.43; base/head 0.86 and 0.87; 
sides weakly arcuate in c. Ti of length, 
sinuate before c. right but variabl(\ blunted 
posterior angles; margins rather narrow, 
each with seta-bearing imncturc^ before 
middle and at l:)asal angle; disc with baso- 
lateral impressions deep but small, sub- 
|)unctat('. i'Jijtrd: width el\tra prothorax 
2.03 and 1.93; apices short-spined, outer 
angles sharply defined, usually acute, su- 
tural angles obtuse; striae lightly impressed. 



punctulate; intervals flat or slighth- convex, 
third usually 2-, sometimes 3-punctate. 
Claws with 6 or 7 teeth. Secondary sexual 
characters: S tarsi as genus; i middle 
tibiae weakly tuberculate-serrate (margin 
wavy); i with 2 or 3, 9 4 or 5 apical 
ventral setae each side. Measurements: 
length 8.5-9.8; width 2.6-3.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
28 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,488) all from Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. 
N. G., altitudes from 1180 to 1500 m, dates 
in Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., June, Sept., Nov., 
1961-1964 (holotype, 1220-1250 m, Jan. 23, 
1963) (Sedlaceks). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 2, 
Jim(m)i R., E. Highlands, July-Sept., 1961 
"(W. W. Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). Papua: 1, 
Ow^en Stanlev Rge., Goilala, Tororo, 1560 
m, Feb. 21-24, 1958 {W . W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. See final couplets of Key to 
Species for place of sedlacekortim among 
other New Guinean Demetrida. 

Demetrida brandti n. sp. 

Description. See Plate 3, figure XII; 
with characters of genus; form c. of paUipes 
and discoidalis, slender, with long-spined 
elytra; color entirely bhu^-black. with dark 
appendages; not pubescent, microsculpture 
\irtuallv absent even on elvtra, surface not 
much (very finely, sparsely, inconspicu- 
ously) punctulate. Uead 1.09 and 1.07 
width prothorax; c\es prominent, genae 
shorter, oblicine. Prothorax ({uadrate, long; 
width ItMigth 0.98 and 1.03; base ;ipex 1.44 
and 1.43; base head 0.87 and 0.88; sides 
weakly arcuate in c. ant(Mior 'H, broadly 
sinuate before c. right or slightK" acute 
posterior angles; margins rather narrow 
each with seta near or before middle and 
at base; baso-l;iteral impressions moderate, 
subpunctate. Elytra: width elytra pro- 
thorax 1.98 and 1.94; apices with moderately 
long spines, outer angles wc-ll defined, ± 
ritiht, sutural angles blunted; striae sli<j:htl\ 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Daiiin<'toii 



183 



impressed, faintly punctulate; intervals 
slightly convex, 3rd 2-punctate. Claws with 
c. 6 teeth. Secondary sextial characters: i 
tarsi as genus; 6 middle tibiae tuberculate- 
serrate ( c. 4 tubercles ) ; i with 3, 9 4 or 5 
apical ventral setae each side. Measure- 
ments: length 8.8-10.2; width 2.8-3.3 mm. 
Types. Holotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
2 paratypes from Finisterre Rge., Saidor, 
Kiambavi Village, N-E. N. G., 1400 m, 
July 22-29 (holotype), Aug. 1-28 (para- 
types); 1 paratype, Saidor, Funyende, 1200 
m, Sept. 24; 2 paratypes, Saidor, Matoko, 
Aug. 29-Sept. 5, Sept. 6-24 (all collected 

1958 by W. W. Brandt for Bishop Mus.; 
some paratypes now in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,489). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 2, Swart 
Vy., Karubaka, 1500 m, Sept. 20, 1958 
(Gressitt); 1, Gewak, Salawaket Rge., 1530 
m, Sept. 6, 1956 (E. J. Ford, Jr., Bishop 
Mus.), in light trap. West N. G.: 2, 
Wamena, 1700 m, Feb. 10-25, 1960 (T. C. 
Maa, Bishop Mus.). Papua: 1, Purosa 
Camp, Okapa area, 1950 m, Sept. 23, 

1959 (L. J. Brass, Sixth Archbold Exp., 
A.M.N.H.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 

1 9 paratype from Kiambavi. 

Notes. This will probably prove to be a 
geographic subspecies of sedlacekorum dis- 
tinguished mainly by longer elytral spines. 

Genus PHLOEOCARABUS Macleay 

Macleay 1871, Trans. Ent. Soc. New South Wales 

2, p. 85. 
Sloane 1898, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

23, p. 499. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caraliidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1488 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea and Figure 110. 

Description ( characters common to the 

2 New Guinean species). Form c. as in 
Figure 110; color diverse; not pubescent. 
Head: eyes large, prominent; 2 setae over 
each eye; antennae pubescent from middle 
of 4th segments; front with long, slightly 



curved costa on each side passing inside 
position of anterior seta; clypeus transverse, 
1-setose each side; labrum wide, arcuate- 
truncate, 6-setose; mentum with long, entire 
tooth; ligula subtruncate with 2 principal 
setae, paraglossae attached to ligula, nar- 
rowed and rounded to apex of ligula; palpi 
rather short, apical segments of labial palpi 
widened, c. triangular. Prothorax transverse, 
arcuately narrowed anteriorly, slightly lobed 
at base; margins rather wide, flat, scarcely 
reflexed, each with usual 2 setae; disc with 
impressed middle line and weak transverse 
impressions; base with fine marginal line 
entire or nearly so, apex not margined at 
middle. Elytra with rounded, slightly nar- 
rowed humeri; apices obliquely sinuate- 
truncate, with outer angles broadly and 
inner angles narrowly rounded; striae entire, 
moderately impressed, not punctate; in- 
tervals not specially elevated at base, 3rd 
2-punctate with punctures before middle 
on outer edge and behind apical % near 
inner edge. Inner icings full. Legs mod- 
erate; 4th segments middle and hind tarsi 
emarginate; 5th segments with accessory 
setae; claws each with c. 4 rather long 
teeth. Secondary .sexual characters: i front 
tarsi scarcely dilated, 2-seriately squamu- 
lose; i middle tarsi also squamulose; i 
middle tibiae not excised; 6 with 1 prin- 
cipal (sometimes a 2nd smaller), 9 2 setae 
each side last ventral segment. 

Type species. P. mastersi Macleay, of 
Australia. 

Generic distribution. Australia, with 1 
Australian species extending to New 
Guinea and New Britain, and an addi- 
tional species endemic in New Guinea. 

Notes. The 2 species here assigned to 
Phloeocarahus are very different super- 
ficially but share the technical characters 
of the genus. 

Key to Species of Phloeocarabvs of 
NE^v Guinea 

1. Color black or piceous, elytra with testa- 
ceous marks (p. 184) nigricollis 

- Strikingly bicolored, head and prothorax red, 
elytra bine (p. 184) -— euplenes 



184 Bulletin Museuni of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Phloeocarobus nigricoHis (Macleay) 

Macleay 1864, Trans. Ent. Soc. New South W'ak-s 

1, p. Ill {Trigoiwthoiis) . 
See also references under yenus. 
hasalis Sloane 1907, Deutsche Eut. Zeitschrift for 

1907, p. 182 (new synonymy). 

Description. None required here; length 
c. 6-8 mm. 

Types. Of nipicoUis, from Port Denison 
( Bowen ) , Queensland, Australia, presum- 
ably in Macleay Mus., Sydney; of basalis, 
from the Gazelle Pen., New Britain, should 
be in Deutsche Ent. Institut, Berlin- 
Dahlem ( none seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Thirty-four 
specimens, from localities covering almost 
the whole length of New Guinea, most at 
low altitudes but records up to 1300 (at 
Wau), 1400, and 1500 m. 

Notes. Sloane distinguished hasalis from 
niii,rieollis by a slight color difference, 
which does not hold in the series before me: 
5 specimens from New Britain include both 
individuals with base of elytra entirely dark 
{hasalis) and individuals with the pale 
marks reaching the elytral base (nigricollis). 
The series from New Ckiinea is even more 
variable, with elytra ranging from almost 
wholly reddish testaceous to almost wholly 
piceous with subbasal pale marks scarcely 
indicated. The pronotum also varies, from 
reddish piceous with pale margins to red- 
dish testaceous, and the variation is partly 
independent of the variation of elytral 
pattern. All these color forms seem to me 
to be one species. The variation of pattern 
may prove to be partly geograjihic, but the 
material liefore me is not suHicient to 
establish this. 

Phloeocarobus euplenes n. sp. 

Descrij)tion. With characters of genus; 
lonn as in T^igure 110; strikingly bicolored, 
head and prothorax red, elytra blue, lower 
surface and appendages reddish testaceous; 
moderateh' shining, reticulate niierosculp- 
ture absent or hunt on bout and on disc 
oi pronotum, distinct and slightK trans- 
verse on cKlra. Head: O.Tf) and 0.76 w idlh 



prothorax; front scarcely impressed, faintly 
sparsely punctulate. Prothorax: width/ 
length 1.58 and 1.62; base/apex 1.67 and 
1.62; margins broadly flattened, not much 
reflexed; disc sparsely irregularly punctu- 
late and faintly transversely strigulose. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.42 and 
1.47; striae well impressed, faintly punctu- 
late; intervals slightly convex, each with an 
irregular row of punctules along middle. 
Secondary sexual characters: i as for genus; 
9 unknown. Measurements: length 5.0- 
5.2; width 2.1-2.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Torricelli Mts., Wantipi Village, N-E. N. G., 
Nov. 30-Dec. 8, 1958 (W. W. Brandt); 
and 1 i paratvpe (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,490) from Kiunga, Fly R., Papua, T'llv 
11-14, 1957 (W. W. Brandt). 

Notes. This new Phloeocarahus is strik- 
ingly different in color from any other 
member of the genus known to me. In 
form and color it resembles and may mimic 
New Guinean species of the agonine genus 
Eui)lenes. 

Genus TRIGONOTHOPS Macleay 

Macleay 1804, Trans. Eut. Soc. New South Wales 

1, p. 110. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1488 (see for additional references and list 

of species). 

DiaiS.nosis. Sec^ Key to Genera of Lehii)}i 
of New Guinea and Notes under the follow- 
ing species. 

Description. None rt>quired here. 

Type s))ecies. Calleida pacifica Erichson 
of Australia (original designation). 

Generic distribution. TT(>retofore known 
onK' horn Australia including Tasmania 
and oilier elose-King islands; range now 
extended lo New (>uinea. 

Notes. The Australian numbers ot this 
geinis li\(" on tree trunks. 1 think. 

Trigonothops lateralis n. sp. 

Description, i-'onii as in f'igure 111; en- 
tireU (slightly reddish) xellow except h:)r 
a wide biowiiish black stripe along the 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlinp,ton 



185 



outer side of each elytron (not including 
the reflexed margin) from humerus nearly 
to apex; not pubescent; moderately shining, 
with lightly impressed reticulate micro- 
sculpture isodiametric on front, slightly 
transverse on disc of pronotum and elytra. 
Head 0.86 width prothorax; 2 setae over 
each eye; front slightly impressed at middle, 
longitudinally impressed each side anteri- 
orly; clypeus broadly rounded anteriorly 
( a small notch at middle may be abnormal ), 
1-setose each side; labrum transverse, ir- 
regularly broadly rounded in front, 6-setose; 
mentum with triangular tooth; ligula thick- 
ened, blunt, probably originally setose but 
setae broken short; paraglossae c. long as 
or slightly shorter than ligula, attached 
except at extreme apex, apparently with- 
out setae; maxillary palpi not or not much 
thickened, labial palpi with apical seg- 
ments wider, not quite ^2 wide as long, 
narrowly obliquely truncate. Prothorax 
subcordate but with broad base; width/ 
length 1.44; base/apex 1.54; base broadly 
briefly lobed, margined; apex broadly emar- 
ginate, not distinctly margined at middle; 
side margins broad and reflexed especially 
toward base, each with 2 seta-bearing punc- 
tures, at basal angle and c. % from apex; 
disc with middle line deep, transverse im- 
pressions less well defined, baso-lateral 
foveae deep but not sharply limited; surface 
of disc with faint weak transverse strigula- 
tion, almost impunctate. Elytra: width 
elytra/prothorax 1.94; humeri slightly nar- 
rowed and rounded but not obliterated; 
reflexed lateral margins moderate; apices 
slightly obliquely truncate and very slightly 
sinuate, with outer angles broadly and su- 
tural angles narrowly rounded; striae entire, 
moderately impressed, faintly irregular but 
not distinctly punctulate; intervals slightly 
convex, not distinctly punctate except 3rd 
with 2 small dorsal punctures, on inner edge 
just before middle and behind apical Vi (sub- 
basal puncture, if present, minute and not 
surely detectable). Inner wing,s full. Legs: 
hind tarsi missing; middle tarsi with 4th 



segments very deeply emarginate, with 
lobes much longer than V2 length of seg- 
ment; claws (of front tarsi) each with 4 
long teeth and apparently an additional 
very short tooth toward base; 5th segments 
(of front tarsi) with accessory setae. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters: i unknown; $ 
with last ventral segment subtruncate, 
slightly subsinuate at middle, with 2 setae 
near apex each side. Measurements: length 
6.7; width 2.9 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (Leiden Mus.) from 
Wissel Lakes, central West N. G., Arabu 
Camp, 1800 m, Oct. 12, 1939 (H. Boschma); 
the type is unique. 

Notes. Even without the 6 I am rea- 
sonably sure that this insect is a Trigono- 
thops. It agrees with T. pacificus Erichson 
in form and in significant characters in- 
cluding the mouthparts (see preceding 
Description ) and position of the dorsal 
elytral punctures. Moreover, the elytral 
color pattern is derivable from that of 
Trigonotliops pacificus: lateral stripes like 
those of hiteralis would be left if the inner 
portion of the dark elytral pattern of 
pacificus were erased. 

This individual had lost most of its legs 
before I received it. Only the left front leg 
is still complete, and the left middle leg is 
complete except for the 5th segment. But 
these are enough to show essential char- 
acters, and the specimen is in good condi- 
tion otherwise. 

Genus NOTOTARUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1875, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 49, Part 

2, p. 19. 
Sloane 1898, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South 

Wales 23, p. 494. 

Diagnosis. As Aiu)motarus (following 
genus) but side pieces of metasternum short, 
scarcely longer than wide; and (in the New 
Guinean species) genae short-setulose; an- 
tennae with segments 2 and 3 more or less 
pubescent; tarsi pubescent (sparsely short- 
pilose) above; i middle tibiae not modi- 
fied. 



186 Bulletin Mit.'icum of Coinparatwv Zoolof^y, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Description. See Notes (below) and de- 
tailed Description of following species. 

Ti/j)e species. Nototariis australis Chau- 
doir, of Western Australia. 

Generic distribution. Previously known 
only from Australia; range now extended 
to New Guinea. 

Notes. Chaudoir described Nototarus as 
without a mentum tooth, and the tooth is 
certainly difficult to see in some Australian 
species, but it may be depigmented rather 
than absent. The characters and generic 
classification of this group of Carabidae 
need further study, which will have to be 
based on the Australian rather than New 
Guinean forms. Some Australian species 
assigned to Nototarus by Sloane do have 
the mentum toothed, and the single New 
Guinean species (below) is evidently 
closely related to some of them. 

Nototarus papua n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 112; 
brownish black, humeri broadly paler 
brown, appendages brownish testaceous; 
reticulate microsculpture lightly impressed, 
c. isodiametric on front, slightly transverse 
on pronotum, more irregular on elytra, and 
surface irregularly rather sparsely punctu- 
late. Head 0.81 and 0.80 width prothorax; 
eyes moderately prominent, genae rounded- 
oblique, short-setulose; 2 setae over each 
eye; front longitudinally rugulose each side; 
clypeus slightly emarginate-truncate, 1- 
setose each side; labrum wide, slightly 
emarginate-truncate, 6-setose; mandibles 
rather short, curved; antennae moderate, 
pubescent from middle of 3rd segments; 
mentum w ith long, narrowly rounded tooth; 
ligula 2-setose, paraglossae attached, e(iual 
in length, wide, not setose; maxillary palpi 
slender, labial palpi with apical segments 
wide. Prothorax cordate, short-lobed at 
base; width length 1.31 and 1.30; base 
apex 0.88 and 0.92; margins narrow, each 
with seta at basal angle and c. ' i from apex; 
basal and apical marginal lines inti-rrupted 
at middle; disc with middle line coarse, 
almost entire, transxcrse impressions almost 



obsolete. Elytra short, narrowed toward 
base, connate; width elytra/prothorax 1.49 
and 1.51; striae entire, impressed, faintly 
punctulate; intervals convex especially 
toward base, 3rd 2-punctate, the punctures 
near middle of length and c. V4 from apex. 
Inner icings vestigial. Lower swjace not 
obviously pubescent ( in part with very 
short inconspicuous sparse pubescence). 
Le^s moderate; tarsi short-pilose above; 
4th segments middle and hind tarsi slighth" 
emarginate; 5th segments with long ac- 
cessory setae; claws each with 3 or 4 teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters: labial palpi 
with apical segments wider in c^ (truncate 
apex wider than length of inner edge), 
narrower in 9 (truncate apex narrower 
than inner edge); 6 front tarsi slightly 
( scarcely ) dilated, 3 segments 2-seriately 
squamulose; i middle tarsi not squamu- 
lose; i middle tibiae not modified; $ with 
1, 92 seta-bearing punctures each side 
last ventral segment. Measurements: length 
4.6-5.3; width 1.9-2.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype 6 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,491) and 20 paratypes all from Dobo- 
dura, Pa|>ua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured specimens. The c^ holot\'pe and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. This is the onl\' Nototarus thus 
far found in New Guinea. It may be re- 
lated to N. morosus Sloane of Port Darwin, 
Australia, but has thc^ prothorax exidently 
more narrow(>d posteriori), with sinuate 
sides. Other, apparently related, unde- 
scribed spicies occur in North Queensland. 

This species is one of the very few strictly 
flightless Garabidae found at low altitudes 
in New Guinea. Most or all of in\- speci- 
mens were, I think, taken in flood debris 
from the floor of rain forest. The rain-forest- 
floor habitat and the insect's tlightlessness 
pi'rhai)s explain w h\ other collectors have 
not tound it. 

Genus ANOMOTARUS Chaudoir 

Chaiuloii I,S7.^, linll. Soc. Nat. Moscow U), Part 2, 
p. \H. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 187 



Sloane 1898, Pioc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

23, p. 494. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caraliidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1493 ( see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 
Tedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 300, 

450. 

Diap,nosis. See Key to Genera of Lebiini 
of New Guinea. 

Deseription (based on New Giiinean 
species only). Fomi as in Figures 113- 
117; small, slender, depressed; elytra usu- 
ally (not always) with characteristic pale 
marks; not pubescent. Head: eyes mod- 
erately prominent, genae rounded, more or 
less prominent ( usually less so than eyes ) ; 
2 setae over each eye; antennae moderate, 
pubescent from 4th segment (3rd segment 
with only usual apical setae); clypeus trans- 
verse with rounded angles, 1-setose each 
side; labrum transverse, broadly emargi- 
nate, 6-setose; mandibles short, strongly 
curved; mentum with long tooth; ligula 
rather broad, 2-setose, paraglossae attached 
and c. equal in length, wide, not setose; 
maxillary palpi moderate, not widened; 
labial palpi with apical segments widened. 
Frothorax cordate, with base briefly lobed; 
side margins moderate or narrow, with 
setae at basal angle and c. V-i or % from 
apex; disc with impressed middle line and 
less distinct transverse impressions. Elytra 
with apices simple; striae entire, not dis- 
tinctly punctate; 3rd intervals 2-punctate, 
with punctures near or before middle and 
c. Vi from apex; 8th intervals usually finely 
carinate on inner edge near base (carinae 
sometimes so fine as to be scarcely detect- 
able). Inner wings iuW. Lotver swiace not 
extensively pubescent; side pieces of meta- 
sternum long. Legs slender; tarsi not pubes- 
cent above; 4th segments middle and hind 
tarsi slightly emarginate; 5th segment with 
long accessory setae; claws with c. 4 or 5 
teeth. Secondary sexual characters: i front 
tarsi slightly (scarcely) dilated, 3 segments 
2-seriately squamulose; last segment i labial 
palpus wider (truncate outer edge almost 
as long as inner side), of 9 less wide; 6 



middle tarsi without squamae; i middle 
tibiae with inner edge tuberculate-serrate 
( cf . Demetrida ) , with c. 3 or 4 low tuber- 
cles in row toward apex ( in all New 
Guinean species of which the c5 is known ) ; 
i with 1, 9 2 setae each side last ventral 
segment. 

Type species. Anomotarus olivaceus 
Chaudoir, from Melbourne, Australia. 

Generic distribution. Southern Asia 
(Ceylon, India, Japan, etc.) to Australia 
and Tasmania, and New Caledonia. 

Notes. Although I recognize 8 (closely 
interallied) species of Anomotarus in New 
Guinea, material is scanty and almost 
nothing is known of their habits. I think 
most of them probably live among dead 
leaves on the ground in rain forest. A few 
specimens have been taken at light. 

Key to Species of Anomotarus of New CIuinea 

1. Each elytron either with longitudinal post- 
humeral stripe (outside 4th stria) and sub- 
apical-sutural spot pale, or with only the 
subapical spot, or unmarked 2 

- Each eh tron with a more or less incomplete 
oblique or transverse (not longitudinal) spot 
or band before middle and usually (not 
always ) a subapical-sutural spot pale 5 

2. Very slender (prothoracic width/length 
1.15); subsericeous black, unmarked (p. 
188 ) gressitti 

- Less slender (prothoracic width/length c. 
1.20 or more); elytra with at least subapical- 
sutural pale spot(s) 3 

3. Elytra with distinct post-humeral stripes 
(as well as subapical-sutural spot(s)) pale; 
prothorax less narrowed basally (base/apex 
e. 1.10 or more) (p. 188) (stignnila) 

- Post-humeral stripes indistinct or absent 
(subapical-sutural spot(s) distinct); pro- 
thorax more narrowed basally (base/apex 
1.05 or less) 4 

4. Brown, with subapical-sutural spots small and 
separated; prothorax narrowed (width length 
1.22 and 1.23); elytra more narrowed toward 
base (p. 188) —_ tvallacei 

- Black, with subapical-sutural spots united in 
conspicuous square plagia; prothorax wider 
(width length 1.35); elytra less narrowed 
toward base ( Eig. 115) (p. 189) phigifer 

5. Each elytron with transverse-oval pale spot 
before middle but without subapical spot 
(Eig. 114) (p. 189) ocellatus 



188 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



- Elytra with aiitt'iior and posterior pale 
spots 6 

6. Elytra with an almost strictly transverse, 
rej^ular, c. entire pale fascia before middle 
( as well as an incomplete siibapical fascia ) ; 
elytral margins bicolored; femora bicolored; 
surface in part sericeous; length 5.5-6.0 mm 
(p. 189) tratisversus 

- Anterior elytral marks more oblicjue and/or 
more irregular and/or more interrupted; 
elytral margin usually entirely translucent- 
testaceous; femora not bicolored; surface not 
or not so strongly sericeous, more shining; 
size usually smaller 7 

7. Anterior elytral marks usually more oblique; 
femora pale ( Moluccas and western antl 
central New Guinea) (p. 190) onuitii.s 

- Anterior elytral marks more nearly trans- 
verse; femora darker (central and eastern 
New Guinea) 8 

8. Prothorax wider (width/length 1.38 and 
1.41); markings wide (p. 190) fuscipcs 

- Prothorax narrower (width/length 1.27); 
markings n;irrower (Fig. 117) (see also 
Dc'scii)>tiou) (p. 191) uaii 

Anomofarus gressitti n. sp. 

Description. With cliaractcrs of geiui.s; 
form as in Figure 113; .slender; lilack, not 
marked, but margins of prothorax and espe- 
eially of elytra more or less pale translucent; 
surface dull, closely punctulate and micro- 
reticulate, elytra subalutaceous; legs testa- 
ceous, antennae and mouthparts brownish 
testaceous. Head 0.80 width prothorax. 
Frothorax: width length 1.15; base, apex 
1.00. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.73; 
striae lightly iinpressed, faintly punctulate; 
intervals c. flat, 6th, 7th, and (Sth with 
inner edges finely carinate tor increasing 
distances from base. Measiireitient.s: length 
c. 5.0; width 1.9 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (Bishop Mus.), from 
Maprik, N-E. N. G., 160 m, Oct. 14, 1957 
(Gressitt); the type is uniciue. 

Notes. The slender form and dull bkuk 
color, without markings, should nuikc this 
species easy to recogni/e. 

(Anomofarus stigmula (Chaudoir)) 

Ghaudoir 18.52, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 25. Part 1, 

p. 57 {Ci/min(Jis) . 
Andrewes 19.30, C^at. Indian insects 18, (^arabidac, 

p. 28. 



Csiki 1932, Goleop. Gat., Garabidae, Ilarpalinae 7, 
p. 1493 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Louwerens 1953, Verhandlungen Naturforschcnden 
Gesellschaft Basel 64, p. 316. 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 451. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form, including elytra, elongate; brown, 
elytra each with longitudinal humeral mark 
( outside 4th stria ) and variable apical mark 
pale; appendages including femora testa- 
ceous; rather shining, but surface finely 
microreticulate and sparsely inconspicu- 
ously punctulate. Head 0.84 and 0.86 width 
prothorax. Prothorax: width length 1.24 
and 1.29; base /apex 1.14 and 1.11; margins 
moderate, with basal angles well defined, c. 
right or obtuse (not acute). Elytra long; 
width elytra prothorax 1.65 and 1.69; striae 
moderately impressed, not distinctly punc- 
tulate. Mea.suremcnts: length c. 4.7-5.3; 
width c. 1.9-2.1 mm. 

Type. From Simla(h), northern India; 
now in Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not 
seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Doubtful; 
see following Notes. 

Measured specimens. A i from Coim- 
batore. South India, and 9 from Lawa, 
Malita, Davao Prov., Mindanao, Philippine 
Islands (both specimens M.C'.Z. ). 

Notes. This species is now recorded 
over a very wide area, from SE. Asia 
including Ceylon and Japan to Timor and 
New Caledonia, but apiiarentb not .\us- 
tralia. New Cluinea is included in the 
species' range by Andrewes and Csiki, but 
I have found no detailed record of its oc- 
currence there. I suspect its supposed oc- 
cuiicnce is erroneous, b;ised on the old 
specimens in the British Museum described 
below ;is ualhuci. I h;i\(- not seen true 
sliii,ninla Irom New (iuiiiea. 

Anomofarus wallacei n. sp. 

Dcscripliou. With c h;ir;icteis ol genus; 
lonn shorter than usual in genus; brownish 
pieeous, el\'tr;i e;uli willi laint p;iler AVCd 
behind Immeius (corresponding to post- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



189 



humeral spot of stigmula), a small testa- 
ceous spot on intervals 2 and 3 just before 
apex, and lateral margin narrowly brownish 
testaceous; appendages brownish testa- 
ceous; surface (in part) moderately shining, 
with reticulate microsculpture lightly im- 
pressed and punctulation rather sparse. 
Head 0.84 and 0.89 width prothorax. Pro- 
thorax: width/length 1.23 and 1.22; base/ 
apex 1.00 and 1.05. Elytra shorter and more 
narrowed basally than usual in genus; width 
elytra/prothorax 1.69 and 1.74; striae mod- 
erately impressed, not distinctly punctulate. 
Inner wings apparently fully developed in 
spite of narrowing of humeri. Measure- 
ments: length 4.3-4.9; width 1.8-2.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype 5 (British Mus.) and 
1 9 paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,492) 
both from Dory, West N. G. (presumably 
collected by Wallace); c^ unknown. 

Notes. This species is very close to 
stigmuhi (above) but has elytra shorter, 
more narrowed at base, and with markings 
reduced, and the prothorax coaptively nar- 
rowed at base, as the ratio base apex shows. 
It may prove to be a geographic subspecies 
of stigmida. It may prove not to be from 
New Guinea (because the "Dory" locality 
is always dubious), but it seems not to be 
known anywhere else. 

Anomofarus plagifer n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 115; brownish black, 
elytra with conspicuous, common, square 
spot just before apex pale and lateral 
margins slightly pale translucent; append- 
ages testaceous; surface rather shining but 
lightly microreticulate and faintly sparsely 
punctulate. Head 0.88 width prothorax. 
Prothorax strongly cordate (more so than 
in stigmida); width/length 1.35; base/apex 
1.02; posterior angles abruptly right-acute. 
Elytra of moderate length, slightly nar- 
rowed toward base ( less than in walktcei ) ; 
width elytra prothorax 1.57; striae well im- 
pressed, not distinctly punctulate. Measure- 
ments: length c. 4.9; width c. 2.0 mm. 



Type. Flolotype S (Bishop Mus.) from 
Port Moresby, Papua, May 20, 1956 
(Gressitt), taken in light trap; the type is 
unique. 

Notes. As compared with stigmida, 
plagifer is slightly broader, with more 
cordate prothorax, and is darker in color, 
without basal but with more conspicuous 
subapical elytral marks. 

Anomofarus ocellafus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 114; black (bluish black 
in some lights), each elytron with trans- 
verse-oval pale spot before middle between 
striae 1 and 7; appendages brownish testa- 
ceous, femora darker brown; shining, reticu- 
late microsculpture light ( faint on part of 
pronotal disc) and punctulation very fine, 
faint, sparse. Head 0.85 width prothorax. 
Prothorax cordate; width/length 1.31; base/ 
apex 0.96; side margins narrower than 
usual. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.59; 
striae moderately impressed. Measure- 
ments: length 4.4; width 1.8 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (Louwerens Coll., 
eventually to Leiden Mus.) from Sorong 
"Kpg. Roefci," West N. G., July 8-Aug. 14, 
1948 (M. A. Lieftinck); the type is unique. 

Notes. The small size, relatively shining 
surface, and unique markings distinguish 
this species. 

Anomofarus fransversus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figiue 116; large, with wide- 
cordate prothorax; dull aeneous black, 
elytra more alutaceous, with c. entire cross- 
band before middle and incomplete trans- 
verse mark before apex pale; elytral margins 
bicolored, pale at transverse fascia, dusky 
elsewhere; femora bicolored, dark with 
pale apices; appendages otherwise brown- 
ish testaceous, antennae slightly darker 
distally; surface closely microreticulate, 
sparsely punctulate. Head 0.72 and 0.76 
width prothorax. Prothorax: width length 
1.46 and 1.43; base apex 1.08 and 1.03; 
posterior angles abruptly acute. Elytra: 



190 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



width elytra/prothorax 1.46 and 1.44; striae 
fine, lightly impressed, not punctulate; in- 
tervals almost flat. Measurements: length 
c. 5.5-6.0; width 2.1-2.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,493) and 1 9 paratype both from Do- 
bodura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darling- 
ton); 3 paratypes, Popondetta, Papua, 60 
m, Aug. 30-31, Sept. 1-4, 1963 (Sedlacek), 
light trap. 

Notes. The large size, dull partly aluta- 
eeous surface, and color pattern, especially 
the evenly transverse anterior elytral fascia, 
characterize this species. 

Anomofarus ornafus Louwerens 

Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 237. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as of following species (fuscipcs); 
piceous black, elytra each with broad pale 
mark before middle, this mark being ir- 
regularly transverse-oblique with outer-an- 
terior corner extended toward and some- 
times reaching humerus, and elytra also 
with subapical-sutural spot pale and lateral 
margins entirely pale; legs entirely testa- 
ceous; antennae brownish testaceous; sur- 
face shining, reticulate microsculpture light 
on head, faint on disc of pronotum, more 
distinct on elytra. Head 0.cS6, 0.(S5, and 
0.83 width prothorax. ProtJiora.x cordate; 
width length 1.43, 1.36, and 1.33; base/apex 
1.08, 1.07, and 1.08; posterior angles 
abruptly right or acute. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 1.72, 1.77, and 1.77; 
striae moderately impressed, not punctu- 
late. Measurements: length 5.1-5.8; width 
2.2-2.4 mm. 

Types. From Obi Is. (Laiwui, 0-200 m. 
Sept.-Oct. 1953, A. M. R. Wegner); holo- 
type in Leiden Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. West N. {,.: 
8, Cyclops Mts., Sabron, Camp 2, 2000 ft. 
(610 m), July 1936 (Cheesman); 4, vie. 
Ilollandia (various collectors); 1, Kebar 
Vy. W. of Manokwari, 550 m, Jan. 4-31, 
1962 (S. & L. Quale, Bishop Mus.), in light 
trap; 1, Sansapor, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). 



Measured .specimens. A pair (69) from 
Cyclops Mts. and a 9 paratype from Obi 
Is.; figures given in this order. 

Notes. See under the following species 
( fuscipes ) . 

Anomofarus fuscipes n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form average; black ( slightly brownish or 
aeneous), elytra each with slightly oblique 
transverse fascia just before middle and 
subapical-sutural spot pale and lateral 
margins entirely pale brownish translucent; 
femora brown (not distinctly bicolored), 
tibiae and tarsi paler; antennae brown; 
upper surface rather shining, reticulate 
microsculpture light especially on disc of 
pronotum. Head 0.76 and 0.77 width pro- 
thorax. Prothorax cordate; width length 
1.38 and 1.41; base apex 1.17 and 1.09; 
basal angles abrupth' right or acute. 
Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.66 and 
1.59; striae moderately impressed, not punc- 
tulate. Measurements: length 4.1-5.5; 
width 1.9-2.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,494) from Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 
1944 (Darlington); and paratypes as fol- 
lows. Papua: 1, Karema, Brown R., Mar. 
8-11, 1955 (E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.), taken 
in lowland rain forest; 2, Ml. Riu, Sudest 
Is., 250-350 m, "No. 10," Sept. 3, 5, 1956 
(L. J. Brass, A.M.N.H.); 1, Abaleti, Rossel 
Is., 0-50 m, "No. 12," Oct. 9, 1956 (Brass, 
A.M.N.H.). N-E. N. G.: 1, vie. Nadzab, 
Julv 1944 (Darlington); 1, same localitv, 
May 20-22, 1955 (E. O. \Ailson, M.C.Z.'), 
in dry e\'ergr{>en forest; 1, Eriina, Astrolabe 
Bav, 1896 (Biro); 1, Stephansort, Astrolabe 
Ba'v, 1898 (Bin')). West N. G.: 4, Ilol- 
landia, Nov. 21, 1944; Ma\ 1945; May 4, 
1947 (Iloogstraal, M.C.Z. ); 1, same localitv, 
May 1945 ( Malkin, U.S.N.M.). 

Measured si)ecinu'ns. The • holot\pe and 
1 9 parat\pe from Ilollandia. 

Notes. This species is very close to the 
[M'eeeding (ornatus), but is distinguished 
by brown lather than testaceous femoia 
and 1)\ more transverse anterior eKtral 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlinaton 191 



fascia which approaches the humeri less 
closely, although this mark varies somewhat 
in both species. A. fuscipcs occupies ap- 
proximately the eastern half of New Guinea, 
oniaftis the western half and the Moluccas, 
but their ranges are not strictly allopatric, 
since both occur in the vicinity of Hol- 
landia. 

Anomotorus wau n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 117; black, elytra each 
with oblique fascia before middle and with 
common subapical-sutural spot testaceous 
and margins brownish translucent; append- 
ages brownish testaceous with femora 
darker; shining, reticulate microsculpture 
and fine sparse punctulation present but 
light especially on pronotum. Head 0.84 
width prothorax. ProtJiorax narrow-cordate, 
with relatively narrow margins; width 
length 1.27; base apex 1.05; sides more 
oblique posteriorly (less broadly rounded) 
than in fmcipes, with posterior angles 
abruptly e. right. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.67; striae well impressed, not 
punctulate. Measurements: length 5.1; 
width 2.0 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Wau, Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1200 m, 
July 5, 1961 (Sedlaceks), taken in light 
trap; the type is unique. 

Notes. Although this may be only a form 
of the preceding species (fiiscipes), it has 
a relatively narrow prothorax and reduced 
elytral fasciae and will probably prove to 
be worth distinguishing. More material 
from more localities is needed to show 
whether it is a species or a geographic 
subspecies. 

Tribe PENTAGONICINI 

Fentugonicidac Auct. including Jeannel 1949, 

Coleop. Carabiques de la Region Malgache, 

Part 3, p. 767. 
Jeannel 1942, Faune de Fianee, Coleop. Carabiques, 

Part 2, p. 1017, footnote. 
Penta^onicinae Basilewsky 1953, Exploration Pare 

National TUpemba, Fasc. 10, p. 183. 



Scopodmi Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, 
Harpalinae 7, p. 1500 (see for synonymy and 
additional references). 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 505. 

The beetles of this tribe resemble Lebiini 
but (according to Jeannel 1949) are not 
related to them. Pentagonicini can usually 
be recognized at a glance by form, and 
the tribe is defined by technical characters 
including obliteration of the suture that, 
in most Carabidae, separates the mentum 
from the base of the head posteriorly. 
However, this suture is still indicated in 
Parascopodes. 

This tribe consists of four genera. One, 
Pentagonica., occurs in all the warm regions 
of the world. One, Parascopodes (de- 
scribed below), consists of a single species 
that occurs in both eastern New Guinea 
and northeastern Australia. One, Actenonyx 
(1 species), is confined to New Zealand. 
And the fourth genus, Scopodes, is best 
represented in Australia and extends to 
New Zealand and to mountains on New 
Guinea and on Java. Ecologically, Pen- 
tagonica alone of these 4 genera is pri- 
marily arboreal, occurring especially in 
masses of vines and other vegetation near 
the ground, although some species are 
found among dead leaves on the ground. 
Parascopodes cyaneus occurs, in my limited 
experience, in grass or on the ground under 
grass (I am not sure which). The New 
Zealand genus (Actenonyx) is probably 
ground-living. And Scopodes is ground- 
living but some species occur on logs or 
tree trunks. 

The distribution of genera of Penta- 
gonicini suggests two possible geographic 
histories. The tribe may once have been 
better represented in other parts of the 
world and may have withdrawn (or may 
be withdrawing) into the Australian Region. 
Or the tribe may have originated in Aus- 
tralia and diversified there, and Pentagonica 
may have spread from there over the rest 
of the world, its spread perhaps facilitated 
by its invasion of arboreal habitats in 
which flight and dispersal may have been 



192 BiiUctin Miiscinu of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



favored. The very wide distributions of 
some species of Pento^onica show that the 
insects do disperse readily. Of course, there 
is a third possil^ihty, that the geographic 
liistory of the tribe has been more complex 
than can be guessed from present distribu- 
tions of genera and cannot now be deci- 
phered at all. Nevertheless, the history of 
the tribe is worth guessing about. Its 
distribution may become more significant 
if other Carabidae or other animals are 
found to have similar geographic patterns. 
There is, for example, a suggestive general 
similarity between the distributions of this 
tribe of carabid beetles and of the parrots, 
which are most diverse in the Australian 
Region with one of the several Australian 
subfamilies spread over the warmer parts 
of the world (Darlington, Zooiieoiiraplnj, 
Wiley, 1957, pp. 271-272, ;30()-;301, fig. .34). 

Key to Genera of Pentagoxicim of 
New Guinea 

1. Form Lt'/;;'a-like, with eyes only iioniuilly 
prominent (Fig. 118) (p. 192) _.._ Pcntd^onica 

— Fomi more eompaet, with eyes larger and 
more abruptly pronnnent (Figs. 120, 121) _ 2 

2. Ligula normal, not miieh swollen, mueli 
shorter than paraglossae; i front tarsi 2- 
seriately squanmlose; elytral striae and in- 
tervals regular, without eonspieuous foveae 
(p. 19.5) Parascopodes 

- Ligula swollen, club-like, as long as or longer 
than paraglossae; i front tarsi with soles of 
densely packed slender squamae; elytral 
striae and intervals usually more or less ir- 
regular, .^rd intervals usually with eon- 
sj^iiciinns lovcae (p. 197) _ Scopixlcs 

Genus PENTAGONICA Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-( ioclx'l I S4(), I'auniila (]olco|). Hiiiiianiae, 

p. 47. 
Csiki 19.32, Clolcop. Gat., ("arahidae, llarpaiiiiac 7, 

\i. 1.500 ( see lor additional r(i<icnees, s\iion\niy, 

and list of species ). 

Di(iu.n()si.s. Immediately recogni/able b\- 
lorm ( I'ig. 11<S) and tribal characters. 

l)c.scrij)liou. None reciuired here. 

Tijjx' species. Peiitagonica ntficollis 
Schmidt-Cioebel ( below ) . 

Generic distribution. All warm regions 
ol the world. 



Notes. The members of this genus are 
winged, active, and apparently diurnal. 
They usually live in dense vegetation within 
a few feet of the ground, or sometimes in 
leaf litter on the ground. Specific char- 
acters in the genus arv few, principally 
slight differences of form, microsculpture, 
and color pattern. There is some individual 
variation, including apparent dimorphism 
of color in some cases. And understanding 
of the species is made more difficult by the 
very wide distributions of some of them. 

Because the prothorax has no distinct an- 
terior angles, the ratio base apex is omitted 
in the following specific descriptions. 

Key to Species of Pentagonica ok New Guinea 

1. Prothorax strongly pedunculate; ( bicolored, 
dark with prothorax red; elytral striae punc- 
tulate; size small, length .3-.3.8 mm) (p. 
192) pallipcs 

- Prothorax less strongly pedunculate; size usu- 
ally larger 2 

2. Pronotum with lateral margins usually con- 
nected posteriorly by a weak transverse 
ridge that is not ((uite basal; reticulate 
microsculpture of elytra often somewhat 
transverse; (color above unitormK d;irk or 
with prothorax red; length c. 3.5-4.5 mm) 
(p. 193) l^himla 

- Proncjtum with lateral margins connected 
posteriorly b>' a line ridge that reaches 
extreme base; elytral microreticulation usu- 
ally c. isodiametric; size larger .3 

3. Prothorax relatively narrower ( width length 
1.57 and 1.65); (color dark, with lateral 
margins of prothorax and elytra strikingh' 
pale) (p. 194) crichsoui 

- Prothorax relatively wider (width length 
1.72-1.79) [ 4 

4. Bicolored, d;uk with red prothorax (p. 
194) nificollis 

- Not bicolored, entirely dark 5 

5. Flytral striae clearly indicated (hut scarcely 
impressed); antennae rilativeb dark ;uid 
femora relatixcK pale (p. 194) papiia 

- FKtral striae \irtu:dl\ obsolete; antennae 
testaceous, Icmoia rclatixcK (!;nk (p. 19.5) 
_ cstriaia 

Pentagonica pallipes (Nietner) 

Nielncr 18.5(i, 1. Asiatic Soc. Bengal 25, p. .525 
(Klliolia). 

(.'siki 1932, (^oK'op. i'.ni.. Gar:ibida<', Ihupalinae 7, 
p. 1.502 (see for sNiionvinx and additional refer- 
ences ). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



193 



Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abliandlungen 28, pp. 505, 
507. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Head 
and elytra dark, prothorax red. Head 0.91 
and 0.93 width prothorax. Prothorax pedun- 
culate; width length 1.71 and 1.59. Elytra: 
width elytra/ prothorax 1.62 and 1.79; striae 
punctate; reticulate microsculpture slightly 
irregular but scarcely transverse. Measure- 
ments: length 3.0-3.8; width c. 1.5-1.9 mm. 

Type. From Ceylon; should be in Stettin 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Neiv Guinea. Nineteen 
specimens from all 3 political divisions of 
New Guinea; most from low altitudes (in- 
cluding Oro Bay near Dobodura) but 2 at 
1200 m at Wau. One specimen ( from Wau ) 
is labeled as taken at light. 

Measured specimens. A 6 from Hollandia 
and 9 from Port Moresby. 

Notes. The known range of this rela- 
tively distinct species is from Ceylon, the 
Malay Pen., etc., to the Philippines, New 
Guinea, New Britain, and mid-peninsular 
Cape York, Australia (collected hv me 
in 1958). 

Pentagonica blanda Andrewes 

Andrewes 1929, Tijdschrift voor Ent. 72, pp. 315, 
339. 

?htzocn.'iis Jedlicka 1934, Sbornik Ent. Mus. Prague 
12, p. 123. 

?})hili]>pmeims Jedlicka 19.34, Sbornik Ent. Mus. 
Prague 12, p. 124. 

?hottclwri Jedlicka 1935, Acta Soc. Ent. Czecho- 
slovakia 32, p. 140. 

?eurijodes Andrewes 1938, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 
(l"l) l,p. 207. 

?quadratipennis Louwerens 1956, Treubia 23, p. 
236. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
(Fig. 118) broad; color above eitlier en- 
tirely dark or dark with red or reddish 
prothorax; antennae brown or testaceous; 
legs pale, often with darker femora. Head 
0.77 and 0.74 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width/length 1.83 and 1.80; lateral margins 
usually connected by a poorly defined 
(sometimes vague) transverse prebasal 
ridge. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 1.51 



and 1.54; sutural angles usually blunted or 
narrowly rounded but sometimes denticu- 
late; striae lightly impressed, usually finely 
punctulate ( but variable ) ; reticulate micro- 
sculpture often ± transverse. Measure- 
ments: length c. 3.5-4.5; width c. 1.6-1.8 
mm. 

Types. Of blanda, from Sumatra, in 
British Mus. (seen); of Jedlicka's species, 
from the Philippines, types of luzoensis 
and philippinensis in Jedlicka Coll. (not 
seen), of bottcheri, in British Mus. (seen); 
of euryodes, from Java, in British Mus. 
(seen); of quadratipennis, from Halmahera, 
Molueeas, in Leiden Mus. ( not seen ) . 

Occurrence in Neic Guinea. Very com- 
mon throughout New Guinea: c. 130 
specimens (about half from Dobodura), 
most at low altitudes but a few up to 2500 
m (at 1200 m at Wau). 

Measured specimens. A pair (69) from 
Dobodura. 

Notes. I am not ready to synonymize the 
names listed above under blanda, but I 
suggest that they may all prove to apply 
to a single variable species or to members 
of a group of very closely interrelated 
species that ranges from SE. Asia across 
the Malay Archipelago to NE. Australia. 
This species or species group varies strik- 
ingly in color pattern (individuals uni- 
colored or bicolored) and to some extent 
in proportions, size, degree of paleness of 
margins and appendages, and distinctness 
of punctures of elytral striae. Most in- 
dividuals from New Guinea are entirely 
dark above, but 3 from Finschhafen, N-E. 
N. C, and 8 from Hollandia, West N. 
C, have the prothorax red. These super- 
ficially resemble ruficollis (second follow- 
ing species ) , but have different prothoracic 
bases, usually rounded sutural angles, and ± 
transverse elytral microsculpture. Except 
for the red prothorax, these individuals do 
not seem to differ from specimens with 
dark prothorax taken at the same localities. 
At these localities the species is apparently 
dimorphic in color of prothorax. However, 
at some other localities intermediates oc- 



194 Bulletin Musctmi of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



cur: 4 examples that I haxe from Sansapor 
( Vogelkop), West N. G., have the prothorax 
paler than head and elytra but reddish 
brown rather than clear red. Obviously 
this species or group ot species requires 
further study, of material from outside as 
well as inside New Guinea, before its varia- 
tion can be understood. 

Most of the many specimens that I col- 
lectt^d in New Guinea were taken by day, 
by sweeping low vegetation. However, a 
few individuals, including both color forms 
at Finschhafen, are from light-trap material 
and evidently flew to light at night. 

I collected numerous dark (not bicolored) 
specimens apparently of this species at 
several localities in North Queensland in 
1957-195(S. The species seems not to have 
received a name in Australia. 

Penfagonica erichsoni Schmidt-Goebel 

Schmidt-Coel^el 1846, Faunula CoKop. Biniianiat', 
p. 48. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidat', llaipalinae 7, 
p. 1501 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Jedlieka 1963, Knt. Ahliandlnntjen 28, pp. 506. 
.511. 

Description ( for recognition only), h^orm 
of large Fcntuiionica with rather narrow 
prothorax; dull black, reflexed margins of 
prothorax and elytra very pale or translu- 
cent, legs testaceous, antennae brown. 
Head 0.85 and 0.84 width protliorax. Pro- 
thorax: width length 1.57 and 1.65; margins 
posteriorly connected b\ a fine curved 
ridge across extreme base. Elytra: width 
elytra/ prothorax 1.82 and 1.78; sutural 
angles usually denticulate; striae sHghtl\ 
impressed, vaguely or not distinctl\ punc- 
tate; elytral microreticulation r. isodiamet- 
ric. Measurements: length e. 5.0-5.5; 
width e. 2.0-2.2 mm. 

Type. l<'rom liurma; in Prague Mus. (not 
seen ) . 

Occurrence in Netc Guinea. Tapua: 1, 
Dobodura, Mar.-lul\ 1944 (Darlington); 
1, Woodlark Is. (Murn;i), Kulumadau Hill, 
Apr. 20-30. 19.57 (W. W . Brandt, l^isliop 



Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 1, Simbang, Huon 
Gulf, 1898 (Biro); 1, Wau, 1200 m, Sept. 
15-30, 1962 (Sedlacek); 1, Wum, Upper 
Jimmi Vy., 840 m, July 16, 1955 (Gressitt). 

Measured specimens. Two $ 9 , from 
Dobodura and Wum. 

Notes. P. erichsoni ranges from Ceylon 
and SE. Asia to New Guinea and mid- 
peninsular Cape York, Australia ( 1 speci- 
men. Rocky R., 1958, taken by myself). 

Penfagonica ruficollis Schmidt-Goebel 

Sehmidt-Coebel 1846, Fannnla Coleop. Birmaniae, 

p. 48. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1503. 
Jedlieka 1963, Ent. Abhandlunsen 28, p. 509. 

Description (for recognition only ). Form 
of large Pentagonica; black, prothorax red, 
appendages usually black or brown. Head 
0.81 and 0.77 width prothorax. Prothorax: 
width length 1.79 and 1.78. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 1.59 and 1.61; sutural 
angles usually denticulate; striae very light 
or c. absent; microsculpture c. isodiametric. 
Measurements: length c. 5.0-5.7; width e. 
2.0-2.3 mm. 

Type. From Burma, should be in l^rague 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Twt'nt\-six 
specimens from Papua, N-E. N. (i.. anil 
West N. (i., at low altitudes and up to 
1950 m. 

M easurrd sjx'cimens. A i")air ( ci 9 ) b-om 
Dobodura, Papua. 

Notes. The known range of ruficollis is 
Irom SE. Asia to .Australia. 

Penfagonica papua n. sp. 

Description. Form (Fig. 119) of large, 
rather slender Pentaiionica: entireK' black 
or piecous except suture sonictiuies reddish, 
margins sometimes reddish hut not con- 
trastinglx pale; h-mora brown, tibiae and 
tarsi testaceous; antennae brown with 1st 
segments darker biowii; rt'tieulate micro- 
seulpture isodiametric on head and pro- 
notum. nioic incgnlai- or slightK tiansvcrse 
on eKtra. Head 0.78 and 0.78 width pro- 
tliorax; labium transxcrse. 6-setose ante- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



195 



riorl) , the 4 inner setae mueh smaller than 
outer ones; mentum without tooth; ligula 
not much swollen, 2-setose; paraglossae 
slightly shorter than ligula and apparently 
attached to it. Prothorax: width length 
1.73 and 1.72; margins posteriorly connected 
1)\ basal loop. Elytra: width elytra pro- 
thorax 1.63 and 1.63; sutural angles usually 
narrowly rounded, not denticulate; striae 
very finely and lightly indicated, scarcely 
impressed, irregularly punctulate; 3rd in- 
tervals apparently usually with 3 minute, 
well spaced punctures but latter small, dif- 
ficult to find, perhaps sometimes absent. 
Secondary sexual characters: £ front tarsi 
scarcely dilated but with slender squamae 
in 2 slightly irregular rows; c^ with 1, 9 
2 setae each side last ventral segment. 
Measurements: length 4.8-5.7; width 1.8- 
2.2 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,495) and 10 paratypes all from Dobo- 
dura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured s})ecimei}s. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. The preceding Description gives 
all the characters that seem to me worth 
mentioning in this genus, in which the 
species are so similar to each other. The 
particular characters that separate this 
species from others in New Guinea are 
indicated in the Key to Species. The present 
new species is larger than blandii, relatively 
narrower, with different pronotal base and 
slightly different elytral microsculpture, as 
well as more lightly impressed elytral striae. 
As compared with erichsoni, papua has a 
wider prothorax, shallower elytral striae, 
and darker prothoracic and elytral margins. 
The closest relative of papua may be 
ruficollis ( above ) , but the latter is bicolored 
and always (in the specimens before me) 
has the sutural angles subdenticulate or at 
least angulate, while papua is dark, with 
sutural angles usually blunted, rarely sub- 
denticulate. The difference in sutural 
angles is not absolute but is enough to sug- 
gest that the color difference is specific. 



Penfagonica esfriafa n. sp. 

Description. Form of large Penta^onica; 
black or piceous, legs dark, antennae in- 
cluding basal segments pale; entire upper 
surface with c. isodiametric microsculpture, 
at most slightly transverse on elytra. Head 
0.83 and 0.82 width prothorax; details of 
mouthparts as in papua. Prothorax: width, 
length 1.76 and 1.78; margins posteriorly 
connected by a basal loop. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 1.71 and 1.74; sutural 
angles usually finely denticulate; striae ef- 
faced or at most faintly indicated; dorsal 
punctures, if present, minute, almost un- 
detectable. Secondary sexual characters as 
in preceding species (papua). Measure- 
ments: length 4.9-6.2; width 2.1-2.6 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 9 paratype from Eliptamin Vv., N-E. 
N. G., 1200-1350 m, June 19-30, 1959 
(W. W. Brandt); and additional paratypes 
as follows. N-E. N. G.: 1, Eliptamin Vy., 
1350-1665 m, June 23-30, 1959 {\Y. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Wau, Morobe 
Dist., 1200 m, Jan. 3-4, 1963 (Sedlacek); 
1, "No. 14," Umi R., Markham Vy., 480 m, 
Nov. 11, 1959 (L. J. Brass, A.M.N.H.). 
West N. G.: 1, Hollandia, Dec. 15, 1944 
(Hoogstraal, M.C.Z.); 1, Star Mts., Sibil 
Vy., 1245 m, Oct. 18-Nov. 8, 1961 ( S. & L. 
Quate, Bishop Mus.), taken in Malaise 
trap; 3, Japen Is., Mt. Baduri, 1000 ft. (c. 
300 m), Aug. 1938 (Cheesman). Some 
paratypes in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,496. 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Eliptamin Vy. 

Notes. P. c.striata is the same size and 
nearly the same form as papua but slightly 
broader, with differently colored append- 
ages, usually denticulate rather than blunted 
sutural angles, and virtually no elytral 
striae. The latter character, as well as 
color, differentiat(\s estriafa from ruficollis. 

PARASCOPODES n. gen. 

Diagnosis. Form Scopodes-Mke. Head: 
eyes enormous; labrum transverse-quadrate, 
6-setose; mentum \\'ith basal suture in- 



196 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



dicated, and with broad, short, more or less 
emarginate tooth; hgula not swollen, 2- 
setose; paraglossae much longer than ligula, 
with apices narrowly rounded. Prothoia-x 
weakly subpedunculate, angulate at sides, 
2-setose each side. Elytra with entire, regu- 
lar striae; 3rd intervals very inconspicuously 
3-punctate. Secondary sexual characters: 6 
front tarsi narrow, 2-seriately squamulose 
below; i copulatory organs as figured 
(Fig. 178); most other characters as in 
Scopodes (below). 

Description. See Diaiinosis (above) and 
Description of the single species (below). 

Type species. Scopodes cyaneus Sloane. 

Generic distribution. As of the single 
known species: eastern New Guinea and 
North Queensland, Australia. 

Notes. Although the Sro/>or/c.s-like form 
and enormous eyes are striking specializa- 
tions, the labrum, mentum, ligula, elytra, 
and perhaps the S tarsi of Farascopodes 
cyaneus seem generalized within the tribe 
and suggest that the insect may be a 
superficially specialized relict of a primitive 
stock from which both Fentaiionica and 
Scopodes may have evolved. 

Farascopodes cyaneus (Sloane) 

Scopodes cyancii.s Sloane 1907, Proc. Linncan Soc. 
New South Wales 32, p. 380. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 120; color above blue, more 
or less purplish on elytra, below piceous; 
appendages testaceous, mouthparts in part 
browner; shining, reticulate microsculpture 
virtually absent on head, light, irregular, 
usually slightly transverse on pronotum and 
elytra. Head 1.36, 1.32, 1.31 width pro- 
thorax; 2 setae over each eye; Iront smooth 
at middle, with a deep groo\'e each side. 
Prothorax: width length 1.19, 1.16, 1.23; 
margins narrow, each with 2 setae on small 
projections; disc strongly convex; middle 
line and trans\-erse impressions sharply im- 
pressed, latter irreguhuK subpunctatc; sur- 
face of disc smooth excei^t \\ illi laiiit liaiis- 
verse strigulation toward sides. I'Jyhd: 



width elytra prothorax 1.72, 1.72, 1.65; 
striae entire, regular, coarsely punctate; 
intervals regular, flat or slightly convex, 
3rd with 3 very inconspicuous dorsal punc- 
tures (see Notes, below). Inner icings 
dimoiphic: short in 1 i from Dobodura, 
full in all other specimens. Lower sui^ace 
sparsely pubescent; base of abdomen on 
each side ( under bases of femora ) with c. 
6 parallel grooves that may form a stridu- 
lating organ. Legs slender; 4th hind-tarsal 
segments shallowly emarginate; 5th seg- 
ments with accessory setae; claws simple. 
Secondary sexual characters: i tarsi as de- 
scribed under genus; 6 with 1, 9 2 setae 
each side last ventral segment. Measure- 
nients: length 3.7-4.0; width 1.4-1.6 mm. 

Type. From Kuranda, North Queens- 
land, Australia; should be in Sloane Coll., 
Canberra, but I was not able to find it 
there in 1957. 

Occurrence ifi New Guinea. Papua: 3, 
Dobodura, Nhir.-July 1944 (Darlington); 1, 
Misima Is. ("St. Aignan") (ex coll. F. C. 
Morrell, British Mus.). Also 1, "New 
Cuinea, Sayer" (Sharp Coll., British Mus.). 

Measured .specimens. A pair ( c^ 9 ) from 
Dobodma and a 9 from N. of Mareeba, 
Australia (see below); figures listed in this 
order. 

Notes. Besides the specimens from New 
Cuinea, I have 1 9 taken by myself N. of 
Mareeba (about 20 miles SW. of the t>'pc 
locality). North Queensland, Australia, Feb. 
1958, in flooded grassland. 1 can lind no 
significant difference between the New 
Cuinean and Australian specimens, but oi 
course I have not been able to compare 6 
characters. 

\u a footnote to the original description. 
Sloane sa\s that he eould liiid onl\' 1 
( fine ) dorsal puncture on the el\tra oi the 
t\pe. However, under a good stereoscopic 
inieioseope with good light, 1 lind what 
appear to be .3 punctures neaiK e\('iil\ 
spaced along the length of each 3rd inter\al 
in both New (iuinean and Australian in- 
(li\ idnals. 



The Carabid Beetles of Ne\\' Guinea 



Darlington 



197 



The habitat of this species, in or under 
grass at low altitudes, is different from that 
of any Scopodes in New Guinea. If this 
insect is a relict of an ancestral stock from 
which Pcntap.onica and Sco))odcs have 
evolved, as I ha\e suggested under the 
genus, it may still be in an ancestral habitat 
from which Pentag,onica may have invaded 
low vegetation, and Scopodes, habitats on 
the ground. 

Genus SCOPODES Erichson 

Krichson 1842, Archiv fiir Naturgeschichte 8, 

Band 1, p. 123. 
Sloane 1903, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

28, pp. 637-638 (key to Australian species). 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1504 (see for additional references, synonymy, 

and list of species ) . 

DiaiJ^nosis. Form (Fig. 121) character- 
istic, with eyes very large and sides of 
prothorax usually angulate; mentum not 
toothed; ligula swollen, club-like, longer 
than paraglossae, 2-setose; i front tarsi 
with soles of numerous close-packed slender 
squamae not in 2 series. For additional 
diagnostic characters see under the tribe 
and Key to Genera of Pcntaiionicini. 

Description. None required here, but 
note wings full or reduced or dimorphic in 
different Australian species, full in all New 
Guinean species except altus, in which 
reduced. 

Ty})e species. Scopodes hoops Erichson, 
of southern Australia. 

Generic distribution. Australia, New 
Zealand, New Guinea, Java; and 1 species 
(not seen by me) described from New 
Caledonia. 

Notes. This genus divides into 2 groups. 
The typical group includes all the Austra- 
lian and New Zealand species, 1 species 
(altus) at very high altitudes on the Snow 
Mts. in New Guinea, and 1 ( irregidaris 
Andrewes) on mountains in Java. The 
other New Guinean members of the genus 
form a distinct, endemic group of relatively 
compact, often brightly colored species oc- 



curring mostly at moderate altitudes in the 
mountains. These species can be arranged 
in what seems to be an evolutionary se- 
quence involving change of form, loss of 
elytral striae, simplification and reduction 
of sculpture, and intensification of color, 
but the lines of evolution have probably 
been complex. In the last species of the 
Key (adonis. Fig. 123), which is at the end 
of the apparent evolutionary sequence, the 
Scopodes form is much modified (the pro- 
thorax being long and narrow and without 
lateral angulations, and the elytra being 
oval ) ; the elytral striae and sculpture have 
almost disappeared, and the color is deep 
purple. 

These beetles live in the ground or in 
logs. They are probably diurnal: most of 
them are winged, but they apparently do 
not come to light at night. Evelyn Ghees- 
man, in The Land of the Red Bird ( London, 
Herbert Joseph Ltd., no date, p. 134), says 
apparently of Scopodes cheesmani (which 
I describe below), "Other insects were 
very tiny violet beetles, which appeared 
from inside the log, out of one of its many 
passage ways, and ran about on the sur- 
face." This was between 3400 and 4500 ft. 
(c. 1380 m) altitude in the rain-forested 
Cyclops Mts. 

In the following descriptions, the width 
of prothorax includes the tubercles. The 
frontal sulci are counted between the eyes 
just behind the anterior supraocular setae. 
The sculpture of the front of the head, espe- 
cially of the clypeus, is variable, heavily 
impressed or almost obsolete in different 
individuals of single species from single 
localities, and I have therefore not de- 
scribed it in detail in most cases. 

Key to Species of Scopodes of New Guinea 

1. Prothorax with 2 setae each side, the pos- 
terior on conspicuous dentiform processes; 
(depressed; elytra with c. complete striation 
indicated) ( p' 198) altufi 

- Prothorax with only 1 seta each side, c. % 
of prothoracic length from apex, without 
posterior-lateral setae or processes - 2 



198 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137. No. 1 



2. Elytra with conspicuous irregular sericeous 
pattern aiul extensively but irregularly 
striate 3 

- Elytra without conspicuous sericeous pat- 
tern 4 

3. Color bronze, elytral foveae conspicuously 
bine, legs pale (p. 199) tafa 

- Color dark bronze or greenish, eh tral foveae 
not conspicuoush' contrasting, legs dark (p. 

199) ..--' cJihithti 

4. Color usually bronze, never primarily bright 
blue or purple 5 

- Color primarily blue or purple 7 

5. Elytra with striae indicated at least anteri- 
orly 6 

- Elytra without striae (p. 201) sim))lcx 

6. Extensively snbstriate (p. 200) icilsoiii 

- Striae indicated only at base of elytra (p. 

200) Inisdlis 

7. Prothorax with lateral margins (p. 201 ) 
checsiiuini 

- Prothorax without lateral margins (p. 201) 
adoni.s 

Scopodes alius n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 121) relatively depressed, with 
humeri narrowed; black, appendages dark; 
rather shining, but complexly sculptured 
as described below. Head 1.26 and 1.23 
width prothorax; labrum long, strongly 
rounded, with 4 decurved setae anteriorly, 
the inner setae much shorter than the outer 
(setae sometimes broken off); front with 
c. 20 or more fine sulci, latter subparallel 
at sides and base but connected and partU 
transverse at middle ol head; front anteri- 
orly and clypeus and labrum more finel\ 
and closely longitudinally sculptured in 
S 6 , sculpturing reduced in 9 (see Notes). 
Prothora.x: width length 1.24 and 1.27; 
sides margined, each with 2 setae, at an- 
gulation c. ':'. from apex and on conspicuous 
triangular process b(4()re base; disc with 
weak median longitudinal imiiression and 
strong subbasal and subapical transverse 
imprt\ssions; surface of disc covered vvith 
rather line, complex, more or less anas- 
tomosing sculptuic. Elytra: width elytra/' 
prothorax 1.69 and — (elytra too spread to 
measure in 9 ); striae indicated ])\' imdula- 
tions of the surlace bul not sliarpK dclincd. 



slightly irregular; intervals slightly convex, 
3rd with 3 moderate foveae; elytral surface 
with rather light irregular reticulate micro- 
sculpture. Inner tt/ng.s- reduced to c. Vs 
length of elytra. Measurements: length c. 
3.3-3.5; width c. 1.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (Leiden Mus. ) from 
Scree Vy. Camp, Snow Mts., West N. G., 
3600 m, Sept. 19, 1938; 1 i paratype 
(M.C.Z., Type No. 31.497) from same 
locality, 3800 m, Sept. 1938; 1 9 paratype 
(Leiden Mus.), from Lake Habbema, Snow 
Mts., 3250-3300 m, late July-Aug. 1938 (all 
specimens collected by Toxopeus ) . 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
9 paratype. 

Notes. This species differs from all other 
Scopodes known from New Guinea in its 
depressed form and in possessing 2 pairs 
of lateral prothoracic setae. In these ways it 
resembles some Australian species including 
the type of the genus, Scopodes hoops 
Erichson, but (dttis is more shining than 
Jjoops, with better defined pronotal sculp- 
ture, and other minor differences of detail. 
S. altus resembles also irre^idaris Andrewes 
of Java but is black rather than aeneous, 
with elytra less narrowed anteriorly and 
more distinctly striate, as shown b\ com- 
parison with a specimen ol irreu^ularis from 
"G. Tengger, Java, l^rescher." Of the 3 
specic^s just discussed, the Australian hoops 
has dimorphic wings; the New Guinean 
and Javan specie's, reduced ones; but they 
all are probabK derived Irom a winged 
ancestor that dispersed i)\ I light. The 
distribution of this group ol Scopodes in 
the Malax' Archipelago is comparable to 
that of Meeyclothorax. which also occurs 
primariK' in Australia but is represented at 
verv high altitudes on the Snow Mts. ol 
New Guinea and on the mountains ol Java 
(Darlington, Hull. M.C.Z. 126. 1962, pp. 
505-507). S(H' also Mieroferouia, [vige 18 
ol my i^rescut pajier. 

Whether the dillcrence in sculpture of 
clypeus and labrum of the 6 S (Scree Vy.) 
and the V (Lake llabbema) is sexual. 



The Carabid Beetles ok New Guinea • DarUnglon 



199 



geographic, or individual cannot be decided 
without more material. 

Scopodes fafo n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form compact, convex; aeneous, labrum 
dark, dorsal and lateral foveae of elytra 
blue, appendages pale, antennae browner 
distally; head and pronotum shining, sculp- 
tured as described (below), elytra irregu- 
larlv sericeous with irregular reticulate 
microsculpture. Head 1.19 and 1.20 width 
prothorax; labrum rounded, 6-setose; front 
with c. 8 longitudinal sulci abbreviated an- 
teriorly and running into coarse rugosity 
posteriorly; labrum more finely longitudi- 
nally rugose. ProtJwrax: width length 
1.26 and 1.27; sides margined, each with 
seta-bearing puncture on triangular process 
at angulation c. % from apex; disc with 
coarse rugosity transverse posteriorly but 
more confused anteriorly. Elytra subquad- 
rate; width elytra prothorax 1.83 and 1.77; 
several striae indicated on disc but striation 
obsolete externally and apically; 3rd in- 
terval conspicuously 3-foveate. Measure- 
ments: length 3.5-4.0; width 1.4-1.7 mm. 

Ti/pes. Holotype 9 (British Mus.) and 
4 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,498) 
all from Mt. Tafa, Papua, 8500 ft. (c. 
2600 m), Feb. 1934 (Cheesman). 

Additional material. One $ , Wau, Bull- 
dog Rd., N-E. N. G., 2400 m, May 31, 1962 
( Sedlaceks ) . 

Measured specimens. The c^ holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. See preceding Key for characters 
distinguishing this from related species. 
The specimen from Wau is slightly larger 
than the types, with narrower humeri (but 
still with large folded inner wings ) and less 
distinct elytral striation. Additional ma- 
terial may show it to be a distinguishable 
form. 

Scopodes chimbu n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form compact; color dark, subaeneous or 



greenish, elytral foveae not contrasting, 
appendages dark except antennae paler 
basally; head and pronotum sculptured but 
with irregular reticulate microsculpture. 
Head 1.15 and 1.22 width prothorax; labrum 
rounded, 6-setose; front with c. 7 longitu- 
dinal sometimes slightly sinuous sulci 
shining, elytra irregularly sericeous and 
running into coarse rugosity posteriorly and 
sometimes anteriorly. Prothorax: width/ 
length 1.25 and 1.21; sides margined, each 
with 1 seta-bearing puncture, on tubercle 
at angulation c. % from apex; disc coarsely 
rugose, the rugosity in general transverse 
but somewhat confused especially anteri- 
orly. Elytra subquadrate; width elytra/ 
prothorax — and 1.83 ( elytra of c5 too spread 
to measure); several striae indicated on 
disc, outer striae fainter or obsolete; 3 con- 
spicuous foveae on each 3rd interval. Mea- 
surements: length 3.5-4.4; width 1.4-1.7 



mm. 



Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,499) and 2 (99) paratypes from 
Chimbu Vy., Bismarck Rge., N-E. N. G., 
5000-7000 ft. (c. 1500-2135 m), Oct. 1944 
( Darlington ) . 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 2, Mt. 
Mis(s)im, Morobe Dist. (1 specimen at 
6400 ft. = 1950 m) (Stevens, M.C.Z.); 1, 
Joangang, 500 m, Apr. 7-8, and 1, Tumnang, 
1400-1600 m, Apr. 14-15, both on Mongi 
Watershed, Huon Pen. ( 1955, E. O. Wilson, 
M.C.Z.); 1, Saruwaged (Salawaket) Rge., 
upper Bunbok Vy.. 1800-2000 m. May 1955 
(E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.); 1, Sepalakembang, 
Salawaket Rge., 1920 m, Sept. 12, 1956 (E. 
J. Ford, Jr., Bishop Mus.); 1, Kepilam, 
2420-2540 m, June 21, 1963 (Sedlacek); 1, 
Finisterre Rge., Saidor, Matoko, Aug. 29- 
Sept. 5, 1958 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. This species varies somewhat from 
locality to locality, but I do not have enough 
material to distinguish geographic forms. 
Except that my specimens were taken on 
the ground in the more open part of the 



200 



Bulletin Miiscinu of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Chimbu Valley, I can say nothing about 
their habits. 

Scopodes wilsoni n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
compact, convex; color dark, subaeneous, 
elytral foveae not contrasting, appendages 
dark, antennae paler basally; shining, head 
and pronotum coarsely sculptured, elytra 
irregularly microreticulate but without con- 
spicuous sericeous pattern. Head 1.25 and 
1.24 width prothorax; labrum narro\\'ly 
rounded, 6-setose; front with c. 8 longitu- 
dinal sulci running into coarse rugosity pos- 
teriorly and usually anteriorly. Frothorax: 
width/length 1.23 and 1.18; sides margined, 
each with seta-bearing puncture on tuber- 
cle at angulation c. % from apex; disc 
coarsely rugose, the rugosity transverse but 
somewhat irregular and varying in depth, 
and disc also variably punctulate. Elytra 
quadrate; width elytra/prothorax 1.91 and — 
(elytra too spread to measure in second 
specimen); all or several striae indicated 
for much of length; 3 conspicuous foveae on 
or near each 3rd interval. Measurements: 
length 3.4-4.1; width 1.4-1.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,500) from Nganduo to Yunzain, Mongi 
Watershed, Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., 1000- 
1500 m, Apr. 6, 1955 (E. O. Wilson); and 
following paratvpes (all i 6 ) from N-E. 
N. C: 1, Nad/ab, Markham Vy., July 13, 
1944 (K. V. Krombein, U.S.N. M.), this 
specimen further labeled "E. fork Ngafir 
Cr. 100()-3()00 ft. nativc> trail"; 1, Mt. 
Mis(s)im, Morobe l^i.st., 6400 Ft. (1950 m) 
(Stevens, M.C.Z.); 1, Wau, 1300 m, Dec. 
10, and 1, same locality, Nami Ck., 1750 m, 
Aug. 12 (both 1961, Sedlaceks). 

Addilional nuiterial. Fapua: 1, Owen 
Stanley Rge., Goilala, Bome, 1950 m, Apr. 
30-Mav 2, 1958 (W. \V. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.).' West IS. (;.: J, Battau Camp, 1150 
m, Feb.-Mar., and 1, Sigi (lamp, 1500 in, 
Feb. 26, both 1959 (Neth. Ind. -American 
[Snow Mts.] Exp.; Toxopeus). 

Measured specimens. The A holotype and 

9 paratype from Nad/ab. 



Notes. As in the case of chimbu (pre- 
ceding), this species appears to vary geo- 
graphically, but my material is too limited 
to justify describing geographic forms. 

Scopodes basalis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
very compact, convex; dark green or aene- 
ous, elytral foveae not contrasting, labrum 
and legs dark, antennae yellowish brown; 
shining, reticulate microsculpture faint or 
absent e\en on elytra. Head 1.22 and 1.20 
width prothorax; labrum narrowly rounded. 
6-setose; front with c. 7 longitudinal sulci 
sometimes abbreviated anteriorly and pos- 
teriorly. Trothorax: width length 1.21 and 
1.25; sides margined, each with seta-bearing 
puncture on tubercle at angulation c. V:i 
from apex; disc coarsely transversely rugose 
(rugosity sometimes only lightK" impressed) 
and rather sparsely fineh' punctulate. 
Elytra quadrate; width elytra/prothorax 
1.79 and 1.82; striae absent or \irtuall\- so 
except deeph' but variably impressed at 
base, sometimes only on basal declivit\-; 3 
conspicuous punctiform foveae on positions 
of 3rd interxals. Measurements: length c. 
3.3; width c. 1.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype A (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,501) from Joangang, Mongi Watershed, 
Huon Pen., N-E. N. G., 500 m, Apr. 7-8, 
1955 (E. (). \\'ilson); and following para- 
types from N-E. N. (,.: 1, Saruwageil 
(Salawaket) Rge., upper Bunbok \'v., 2300- 
3200 m. May 29-31 (E. (). Wilson, M.C.Z.), 
"mossy forest"; 1, Mt. Mis(s)im, Morobe 
Dist. (Stevens, M.C.Z.); 1, TorricelH Mts.. 
Siaute, sea level, Nov. 9-17, 1958 (\\. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus. ). 

Measured sjx'cimens. The s holot\ jie and 
9 paratyjie Irom Saruwaged Bge. 

Notes. S. basalis diHers from iriisinii not 
oiiK in reduction ol cKtral striation bnt 
also in more pnnelilorm cKtral loxcae and 
\irtnal absence ol icticnlatc inicrosculi')turc> 
of eKtia. 'Ilic oeiui rcnce ol an indixidnal 
near sea IcncI is uiinsnal in this genns in 
New (iuinea. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



201 



Scopodes simplex n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
compact, convex; aeneous black, elytra 
sometimes faintly purplish, front anteriorly, 
clypeus, and labrum ])right aeneous, ap- 
pendages dark, base of antennae paler; 
shining, elytra lightly irregularly microreticu- 
late. Head 1.25 and 1.25 width prothorax; 
front with 7 sulci running into coarse 
rugosity posteriorly and sometimes anteri- 
orly. Prothorax: width/length 1.19 and 
1.22; sides margined, each with seta on 
tubercle c. Mi from apex; disc lightly trans- 
versely wrinkled, ± punctulate ( variable ) . 
Elytra subquadrate; width elytra prothorax 
1.90 and 1.92; disc virtually estriate, with 3 
conspicuous punctiform foveae near posi- 
tion of each 3rd interval. Measurements: 
length 3.8-4.2; width 1.5-1.7 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,502) and 2 paratypes from Nganduo to 
Yunzain, Mongi Watershed, Huon Pen., 
N-E. N. G., 1000-1500 m, Apr. 6, 1955 ( E. 
O. Wilson); and additional paratypes as 
follows. N-E. N. G.: 1, Gemeheng, Mongi 
\\'atershed, Huon Pen., 1300 m, Apr. 11-13, 
1955 (E. O. Wilson, M.C.Z.); 1, vie. Xad- 
zab, July 1944 (Darlington); 2, Sattelberg 
(British Mus., ex Coll. Hauser). West 
N. G.: 8, Wissel Lakes, Moanemani, Kamo 
Vy., 1500 m, Aug. 14, 1962 (Sedlacek); 2, 
Wissel Lakes, Enarotadi, 1500 m, Aug. 14, 
1962 (Sedlacek). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Nganduo to Yunzain. 

Notes. This species, like the preceding 
( hasalis ) , occurs at relatively low altitudes, 
sometimes down almost to sea level (at 
Nadzab ) . 

Scopodes cheesmoni n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 122) compact, convex; blue- 
purple (in general blue with elytra puiple 
with foveae bluer); shining, reticulate 
microsculpture faint or obsolete even on 
elytra. Head 1.31 and 1.35 width prothorax; 
front with 7 sulci running into coarsely 



rugose areas posteriorly and usually anteri- 
orly. Frothorax narrower and less angulate 
than usual; width/length 1.13 and 1.18; 
sides margined, each with seta on small 
projection c. M', from apex; disc coarsely 
transversely sulcate or wrinkled, ± punctu- 
late especially anteriorly. Elytra subquad- 
rate, slightly narrowed toward base; width 
elytra/prothorax 1.98 and 2.09; disc estriate, 
with 3 conspicuous punctiform foveae on 
position of each 3rd interval. Measure- 
ments: length 3.9-4.4; width 1.6-1.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (British Mus.) and 
2 paratypes from Mt. Lina, Cyclops Mts., 
West N. G., 3500 ft. (1067 m). Mar. 1936 
( Cheesman ) ; and additional paratypes as 
follows. West N. G.: 4, Cyclops Mts., 
3400-4500 ft. (c. 1040-1370 m). Mar. 1936 
(Cheesman); 3, Rattan Camp, 1150 m, 
Feb.-Mar., and 1, Sigi Camp, 1350 m. Snow 
Mts., Feb. 28, 1939 (Toxopeus); 1, Bivak 
36, 1220 m, July 30, and 1, Bivak 39, 1300 
m, June 30, 1959, Star Rge. (Neth. New 
Guinea Exp., Leiden Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 
1, Chimbu Vv., Bismarck Rge., 5000-7500 
ft. (c. 1500-2300 m), Oct. 1944 (Darling- 
ton); 1, Eliptamin Vy., 1665-2530 m, June 
23-30, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 
Some paratypes in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,503. 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Mt. Lina. 

Notes. Although not very different in 
form and basic structure from the several 
preceding compact species, cheesmani does 
suggest transition toward the following 
(adonis). 

The habits of this species are suggested in 



Notes under the genus. 



Scopodes adonis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form ( Fig. 123 ) less compact, with longer 
prothorax and more oval elytra, than in 
other members of the "New Guinean group" 
of Sco})odes; purple; front anteriorly, 
clypeus, and labrum cupreous; legs dark; 
antennae with basal and outer segments 
brown, segments 2-5 paler; shining, upper 



202 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



surface without reticulate microsculpture, 
sparsely punctulate. Head 1.37 and 1.32 
width prothorax; front with c. 7 slightly 
unequal sulci behind level of anterior 
supraocular punctures, the sulci abbreviated 
anteriorly and cur\'ing toward sides pos- 
teriorly; neck irregularly rugose. Prothorax 
oval long; width length 0.93 and 0.96; 
sides not margined, not angulate, each with 
seta-bearing puncture c. Va from apex; disc 
strongly convex, with fine but distinct mid- 
dle line, weakly transversely wrinkled. 
Elytra suboval; width elytra prothorax 2.13 
and 2.17; humeri narrower and more 
broadly rounded than in other species of 
group; outer-apical angles obtusely angu- 
late, sutural angles acute; striae absent; 3 
minute, inconspicuous seta-bearing punc- 
tures on position of each 3rd interval. Mea- 
siirement.s: length 4.7-4.9; width 1.7-1.9 
mm. 

T\j])es. Ilolotype i (Bishop Mus.) and 
8 paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,504) from Torricelli Mts., Mokai Village, 
N-E. N. G., 750 m, Dec. 8, 16 (holotype, 
Dec. 8), 1958 (W. W. Brandt); and 2 para- 
types, Torricelli Mts., Mobitei, 750 m, Feb. 
28-Mar. 4 and Apr. 1-15, 1959 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 

Measured speeimcn.s. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Mokai Village. 

Notes. This very distinct species is dis- 
tinguished from all others known to me by 
form, prothorax long with margins obsolete, 
elytra oval with acute sutural angles, elytral 
foveae reduced, and color. However, as 
noted in discussion under the genus, it prob- 
ably does not represent a separate stock in 
New Guinea but seems to be at the end of 
an evolutionary sequence which includes 
other New Guinean species. 

Tribe HEXAGONIINI 

Csiki 19.'32, Colcop. Cat., (;aial)itl;K', Ilaipalinac 7, 
p. 1506 (sec tor s>n()n\niy and additional rclcr- 
enccs). 

flcxofioniitue Jcanncl 1948, (lolrop. C'aiahiqiics dc 
la i^ogion Malgadic, I'ait 2, p. 7.59. 



This is a small tribe (4 genera) of char- 
acteristically formed ( Fig. 124 ) , subparallel, 
often flattened carabids at least some of 
which are specialized to live under the 
leaf sheaths of plants. In this tribe the 
inner lobe of the maxilla has a slender, 
Diocahle apical segment that is diagnostic, 
occurring in no other Carabidae except the 
Cicindelinae. 

The tribe is confined to the Old-World 
tropics. The genus Hexa^onia (below) is 
widely distributed there; 1 additional genus 
occurs in the Oriental Region; 2 more, in 
Madagascar. 

Genus HEXAGON/A Kirby 

Kirby 1825, Trans. Linnean Soc. London 14, p. 
563. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Cavabidat', Ilaipalinae 7, 
p. 1506 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Jeannel 1948, Coleop. Carahiques de la Region 
Malgache, Part 2, p. 759. 

Basilewsky 1948, Bull. Mus. Hist. \at. Belgian 
Congo 24, p. 3 (African species). 

Diaiinosis. See under tribe, of which this 
is the only genus represented in New 
Guinea. 

Deseri))t}on. None required here. 

Ty))e s))eeies. II. terniiiuifa Kirby, of SE. 
Asia. 

Generie distribution. Tropical .\sia and 
islands to New Guinea and northeastern 
Australia; Africa, Madagascar. 

Notes. Members of this genus are rather 
diverse in the Oriental Region including 
the Philii)pines, but ()nl\ I spc^cies group 
extends to New (Guinea and Australia. 
ProbabK' bee;uise the\- oceup) an unusual 
niche and perhaps also beeausi' the\' are 
diurnal and nia\ not ll\ to light, these 
insects are rarel\ eolleeled. The 1 New 
Guinean and the 1 ( nnd(\scrib(Kl ) .Austra- 
lian s|ieeies are eaeli known Ironi a single 
collection made b\ nusell, by breaking 
down tall grass and other a([uatic \-egeta- 
tion into water and picking np the beetles 
;is the\ came to the surhice. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 203 



Hexagonia popua n. sp. 

Description. With characters of tribe; 
form as in Figure 124; head black; pro- 
notum piceous, reddish at base and apex; 
elytra red in anterior 1-2 or more, black 
posteriorly, the black area extending farther 
forward on inner than on outer part of 
elytra; lower surface irregularly reddish and 
piceous; appendages brown; shining, reticu- 
late microsculpture faint or absent on head 
and pronotum, imperfect on elytra; head 
and pronotum irregularly punctate. Head 
1.05 and 1.05 width prothorax; front semi- 
circularly impressed each side; neck deeply 
transversely impressed. Prothorax subcor- 
date; width length 1.06 and 1.09; base/apex 
not calculated (because prothorax rounded 
into neck without distinct anterior angles); 
margins narrow, each with seta c. % from 
apex, without posterior seta; disc with mid- 
dle groove deeply impressed and subpunc- 
tate, other impressions irregular and weak. 
Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 1.66 and 
1.67; striae well impressed, punctate; inter- 
vals slightly convex, 3rd with 3 or 4 con- 
spicuous seta-bearing punctures, 5th with 1 
such puncture c. ^.i from apex on outer edge. 
Lower surface: head below transversely 
rugulose; prothorax below subrugosely 
punctate. Inner wings full. Legs moderate; 
tarsi wide; 4th tarsal segments very deeply 
emarginate, long-lobed; claws simple, not 
toothed. Secondary sexual characters: S 
tarsi not or not much modified, without 
special squamules; i with 2, 9 3 short 
setae near apex each side last ventral seg- 
ment. Measurements: length 7.2-7.8; width 
2.2-2.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,505) and 12 paratypes all from Aitape, 
N-E. N. G., Aug. 1944 (Darhngton). 

Measured specimens. The c^ holotype and 
1 ? paratype (sexes of these specimens 
determined by dissection). 

Notes. This new Hexagonia is probably 
related to lucasseni van der Poll of Java but 
is slightly more slender and much darker, 
with pronotum piceous (red in lucasseni) 



and elytra more extensively black posteri- 
orly. One or more similar but apparently 
undescribed species occur in the Philip- 
pines. 

The habitat of the species is noted under 
the genus. 

Tribe ODACANTHINI 

Sloane 1917, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

42, p. 413. 
1923, Proe. Linnean Soe. New South 

Wales 50, p. 30. 
Jedlieka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 488. 
Habu 1967, Fauna Japonica, Carabidae, Tnui- 

eatipennes Group, p. 13. 
Odacantliidae Jeannel 1948, Coleop. Carabiques 

de la Region Malgaehe, Part 2, p. 745. 
Odacanthinac Basilewsky 1953, Exploration Pare 

National I'Upemba, Fase. 10, Carabidae, p. 108. 
CoIUuriui Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, 

Ilaipalinae 7, p. 1517 (see for .synonymy and 

additional references ) . 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Einbrik Strand 4, pp. 37- 

141. 

Most members of this tribe have a char- 
acteristic form (Figs. 125-131), with pro- 
thorax very long and narrow, usually much 
narrower than head. Technical characters 
of the tribe are given by authors cited 
above. The tribe is well represented in 
the tropics of both hemispheres, less well 
represented in most temperate regions, but 
several remarkable endemic genera occur 
in Australia. 

Liebke ( 1938 ) has published a useful 
generic classification of this tribe for the 
world. His classification is, however, artifi- 
cial, as shown by the failure of some of my 
new New Guinean species to fit into it. 
The form of the 4th hind-tarsal segments, 
used by Liebke in the first couplet of his 
key, is a particularly unsatisfactory generic 
character. Form of the 4th hind-tarsal seg- 
ments does characterize some genera, but 
it is extremely variable in others. See, for 
example. Notes under Dicraspeda in the 
following pages. However, I cannot under- 
take to revise the generic classification in 
dealing with the few members of the tribe 
that occur in New Guinea, except in the 
case of primarily New Guinean genera. 



204 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Ecologically, Odacaiithini are active, 
winged carabids some of which live in 
foliage and some on the ground. Of the 
New Guinean forms, Dicraspeda ( includ- 
ing Philcmonia and Macrocentra) lives in 
understory foliage of rain forest; Clarcncia 
and some CoUiuris, in or under low vegeta- 
tion or dead leaves in wet places; Casnoideo, 
among reeds and in other vegetation in 
water; Eudalia (in Australia), Dohodura, 
and I think also Lachnothorax, in gravel 
and among stones bv running water; and 
Basisticu.s ( in Australia ) , on the ground 
in relatively dry places including open 
Eucahjptu.s woodland. 

Eight genera, 19 species of Odacanthini, 
are known from New Guinea. Two or 3 
stocks of CoIUuris, 1 species of Casnoidca, 
and Lachnothorax have probably reached 
New Guinea rather rec(uitly from the 
Oriental Region. A second species of 
Casnoidea and also Basi.sticus micans (which 
may be related to Coditiris) are shared 
with Australia. Cdarcncia and Eudalia are 
shared with Australia and may be of Aus- 
tralian origin. Monotypic Dohodura is con- 
fined to New Guinea but may be derived 
from Eudalia. And Dicra.s))eda {.sensu lato) 
has radiated chiefly in the rain forests of 
New Guinea, where 6 diverse species now 
exist. 

Key to Genera of Odac:antiiini of 
New Guinea 

1. Lateral niaiyins of protlinrax iDtomplcte 
(i)i(l 4tli liiiul-tarsal sciiiiK'iils \ci>' lonij;- 
lobc'd; strikinjfly bicokiied, bkick (or jiiccous) 
and red ( p. 207 ) (.Uisnoidca 

— Not as above in one oi' more ways; nsually 
not blaek-and-red l)ieoIore(l (olisenrely so 

in lidsislicns ) 2 

2. Antennae with 3rd se,unients \er_\ h)njf, c. 
% longer than 4th segments (p. 209) _.. 

Cldicncid 

— Antennae with ■ivd segments shorter, ('{jual 
to or not more tlian 'A longer tlian 4t]i 
segments 3 

3. Head with fine eosta eaeh side above eye 
ami pronotum elianneled at sides and mid- 
(Ue; ( l)ase ot elytra not i(un\clti pnnetate- 
striate) (yi. 210) l^icraspcdd 

— Not as above in one oi more ways 4 

4. Body pnbeseent ([i. 214) I .(kIiiioIIidiiix 



- Not pubescent 5 

5. Eyes not margined on inner edges by costae 
and front smooth 6 

- Eyes usually margined by costae, or if 
(rarely) not margined, front so coarsely 
pimetate that supraocular costae are indis- 
tinct 7 

6. Elytra not spined (p. 214) EiidaUd 

- Elytra spined (see also Notes under this 
genus) (p. 215) ... Dohodura 

7. Side margins of prothorax absent or incom- 
plete or ( if margins nearly complete ) pro- 
notum not channeled at middle; elytra not 
\erv differentlv sculptured at base and apex 
(p.' 205) _._! Colliuris 

- Side margins of prothorax complete and 
pronotum channeled at middle; elytra 
coarsely punctate-striate in anterior %, 
smooth posteriori)' ( p. 20(S ) Basisticiis 

Genus COLLIURIS Degeer 

Degeer 1774, Mem. Hist. Insectes 4, p. 79. 

Gsiki 19.32, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1.518 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Liebke 1938, Eestschrift Endirik Strand 4, p. 45. 

ledlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 489. 
490. 

Diuiinosis. See preceding Keij to Genera. 

Deseription. None required here. 

Tijpe speeies. Attelahus surinameusis 
Linnaeus, of South America. 

Generic distribtition. All wami regions 
of the worlfl. In the Asiatic- Australian area, 
species are moderately numerous and di- 
verse in southern Asia and the western 
Malay Archipelago, but only 4 species 
( representing 3 indc^pcMident stocks ) have 
been foiuid in New (Guinea. According to 
Liebke, the genus does not reach Australia, 
but I found 3 species of it ( representing 2 
ol the same stocks that are in New Guinea) 
in North Oueensland in I95(S. 

Notes. I cannot fit the New Guinean 
species into T-iebkes subg(Mi(Ma satisfac- 
torily. ('. ro.s.si (below) and also the Aus- 
tralian C. ohscura Gastelnau ha\e \irtualK 
complete lateral prothoracic margins, which 
rules these species out of Colliuris entirely, 
according to Li(>bke (who in fact incor- 
rectly put ohscura in Dicraspeda). Never- 
theless, in loiiu and other characters these 



The Carabiu Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



205 



species seem to me to be closely related to 
Colliuris subgenus EticoUiuris of Africa and 
the Oriental Region. 

Key to Species of Colliuris of New Guinea 

1. Prothorax with lateral margins; intervals 3, 
5, 7 with seta-bearing punctures; (pronotum 
and elytral striae coarsely punctate, head 
smooth) (p. 205) rossi 

- Prothorax without lateral margins, or margins 
reduced to sutures; only 3rd intervals with 
seta-bearing punctures 2 

2. Not maculate; subcylindric, elytra not more 
than 2x width prothorax; entire upper sur- 
face coarsely punctate (p. 205) fii.svipcnnis 

- Quadrimaculate; broader, elytra more than 
2X width prothorax; upper surface c. im- 
punctate except for finely punctate elytral 
striae 3 

3. Less slender, prothoracic width/length 0.60 
and 0.63; elytra not or not much impressed 
(p. 206) papiiu 

- More slender, prothoracic width/length 0.46 
and 0.46; elytra transversely impressed near 
base (see also Description) (p. 206) par 

Colliuris rossi n. sp. 

Description. Form (Fig. 125) of Colliuris 
of Oriental fiiscipennis group; black, legs 
brown with dark knees, antennae brown, 
paler at base; shining, without reticulate 
microsculpture. Head 1.13 width prothorax; 
right mandible with acute tooth on inner 
edge; a fine costa over each eye separated 
from eye by groove; anterior and posterior 
supraocular seta-bearing punctures present 
but no other setae posteriorly; front convex, 
slightly impressed at middle and anteri- 
orly, impunctate; mentum with acute tooth; 
ligula broad, 2-setose; palpi slender, acumi- 
nate, not pubescent. Prothorax long-oval; 
width/length 0.71; base apex 1.34; side 
margins entire except confused by puncta- 
tion at extreme base, narrow, each with 1 
seta before middle; middle line light; disc 
strongly convex, irregularly coarsely punc- 
tate. Elytra subparallel; width elytra/pro- 
thorax 2.00; apices obliquely sinuate-trun- 
cate with outer and sutural angles blunt; 
striae coarsely punctate, the punctures be- 
coming finer posteriorly; intervals 3, 5, 7 
each with 4 to 6 well spaced seta-bearing 



punctures. Inner wings full. Lower surface 
not pubescent, coarsely punctate anteriorly 
including sides of metasternum, smooth 
posteriorly. Legs normal; tarsi not pubes- 
cent and not sulcate above; 4th hind-tarsal 
segments shallowly emarginate. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 front tarsi narrow, 3 
segments narrowly 2-seriately squamulose; 
c5 last ventral segment c. semicircularly 
emarginate at apex, with 1 seta each side; $ 
copulatory organs as in Figure 179; 9 un- 
known. Measurements: length c. 6.5; width 
2.0 mm. 

Type. Holotype £ (Gal. Acad.) from 
Finschhafen, N-E. N. G., May 7, 1944 (E. 
S. Ross); the type is unique. 

Notes. This new species seems closely 
allied only to C. obscura (Castelnau) of 
NE. Australia, but ohscura has only the 3rd 
elytral intervals with seta-bearing punc- 
tures. Otherwise the two species agree in 
most characters including presence of 
virtually entire prothoracic margins, distri- 
bution of coarse punctation (head impunc- 
tate, pronotum contrastingly coarsely punc- 
tate), i secondary sexual characters, and 
presence of an acute tooth on the right 
mandible in some individuals. However, 
presence of the mandibular tooth does seem 
to be an individual character in ohscura: 
in my series from Cairns, the tooth is well 
developed in some and almost absent in 
other specimens. 

The generic assignment of ohscura and 
rossi is doubtful. Sloane (1923, Froc. 
Linnean Soc. New South Wales 48, p. 31 ) 
thought ohscura might go in Arame, which 
is doubtful, and Liebke (1938, Festschrift 
Embrik Strand 4, p. 89) put it in Dicraspeda, 
which is certainly wrong. Only the pres- 
ence of nearly entire prothoracic margins 
prevents placing both ohscura and rossi in 
Colliuris in Liebke's classification, and I 
doubt if the prothoracic margins are of 
generic value in this case. 

Colliuris fuscipennis (Chaudoir) 

Chaudoir 1850, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 23, Part 1, 
p. 26 {Casnoiiid) . 



206 



Bulletin Miiscuni of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Andrewes 1927, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) 19, p. 
106 (Odacantha). 

Csiki 1932, Colfop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1527 (see for synonymy, '■varieties," and addi- 
tional references). 

Lie1)ke 1938, Festschrift Enilirik Strand 4, p. 65, 
fi,y. 27. 

Tedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandkingen 28, p. 494, figs. 
190-193. 

Description. None required here. Note 
form rather slender; eolor bhiek with apex 
of elytra reddish, legs testaceous; upper 
surface including head coarsely punctate; 
length c. 5% mm. 

Type. From China ("Chine, Tchusan?"); 
in Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Ncic CAiinea. Papua: 
1, Lake Daviumbu, Fly R., Aug. 19-30, 
1936 (Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.). 

Notes. Fiiscipennis is the oldest name 
for a very common species (n- group of 
closely related species previously known 
from SE. Asia to Celebes and the Philip- 
pines. Andrewes (1927) says of it that 
fuscijx'nnis Chaudoir, punciata Nietner, 
haeniorrhoidalis Motscliulsky, and jlavi- 
cauda Bates "appear to dilfer very little 
from each other; they may all prove to 
belong to the same species, but at present 
I have not the means of dc-ciding this." 
(isikis, Liebke's, and Jedlicka's treatment 
of some of the doubtful forms as subspecies 
or varieties is not acceptable. Under these 
circumstances I can only refer the New 
Cuinean individual to fuscijx'nuis scnsn 
l(il(K pending revision ol all related tornis. 

Colliuris papua n. sp. 

Description. With character's of genus; 
lonn { I'ig. 126) ol ('olliuri.s, with mod- 
erately broad elytra scarcely impressed be- 
lore middle; black, each elytron with 2 c. 
round yellow spots, centered on tth and 5th 
intervals, belore middle and before apex; 
apjiendages brown, antennae paler al bas(.\ 
moderatcK shining, reticulate microsculp- 
ture hunt and r. isodiametric on front, trans- 
verse on head posteriori)' and on pronofum, 
indistinct on elytra. Head 1.44 and 1.11 
width prothorax; 2 setae ()\cr each e\c bnt 



no other setae posteriorly; front scarcely 
impressed, impunctate. Prothorax long, 
swollen at sides behind middle, strongly 
narrowed anteriorly; width length 0.60 and 
0.63; base apex 1.54 and 1.56; lateral mar- 
gins reduced to sutures, each with 1 seta 
before middle; disc strongly convex, base 
scarcely impressed, middle line fine, surface 
faintly transversely strigulose, punctate 
across base. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
2.24 and 2.22; apices obliquely truncate 
( slightly emarginate ) with outer angles 
rounded, sutural angles scarcely blunted; 
striae formed In rows of small punctures 
which become minute posteriorly; 3rd in- 
tervals with c. 4 seta-bearing punctures, in- 
tervals 5 and 7 without punctures. Inner 
winfis full. Lower surface punctate only 
around front coxae and at front of meso- 
sternum. Lci^s normal; tarsi not pubescent 
and not sulcate above; 4th hind-tarsal s(>g- 
ments shallowly emarginate. Secondary 
sexual characters: A front tarsi narrow, 
narrowly 2-seriately squamulose below; 
last ventral segment slightK' emarginate at 
apex in S , variably impressed in 9 , with 
1 seta each side in c5 , 2 in 9 . Measure- 
ments: length e. 5.5-6.0; width 1.6-1.8 mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,506 ) and 35 paratypes all from Dobo- 
dura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 ( Darlington ) . 

Measured s])eeiniens. The ' holot\pe and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. See Notes imder the following 
species, par. 

Colliuris par n. sp. 

Description. Similar in forTU and most 
characters to preceding t papua ) but more 
slender, with elytra impressed before mid- 
dle; anterior eUtral spots longer antl almost 
eonlined to 5th inlei\als, legs pale at base; 
reticulate microsculptnic not distinct on 
pronotuni. Head 1.65 and 1. 58 width \nn- 
thorax. Prothorax: width length 0.46 and 
0.46; base apex 1.55 and 1.56; disc trans- 
\('rsel\ iinprc^ssed and constricted before 
base. Elytra: width ebtra prothorax 2.60 
and 2.62. ]A)irer surface as in pa))ua excei")t 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 207 



with row of coarse punctures each side 
prosternum before coxae. Secondary sexual 
characters: as for papiia. Measurements: 
length c. 6.0-7.0; width 1.7-2.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,507 ) and 5 paratypes all from Hollandia, 
West N. G., July-Sept. 1944 ( Darlington ) . 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 7, 
Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). 

Measured specimens. The $ holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. C. papua and par seem to be 
allopatric representatives of one ancestral 
stock, but they differ too much to be con- 
sidered subspecies. C. par is the more 
widely distributed: I found it at Cape 
Gloucester, New Britain, in 1944, and 
(1 9 ) at Lockerbie, near the tip of Cape 
York, Queensland, Australia, in 1958. A 
second 9 from Lockerbie is superficially 
similar but much more compact and differs 
in other details. I think it probably rep- 
resents a 3rd, distinct species of this group 
of Colliuris. 

Genus CASNOIDEA Castelnau 

Castelnau 1834, Etudes Ent. 1, p. 40. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1534 (see for synonymy, additional refer- 
ences, and list of species). 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, pp. 489, 
498. 

Ophinnca Eschscholtz 1829, Zool. Atlas 2, p. 5 
(not Ophionea Klug 1821). 

Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 79. 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Of both Casnoidea and 
Ophionea Eschscholtz, Attelahus indica 
Thunberg. 

Generic distribution. SE. Asia including 
Ceylon and Japan to Australia; a species 
recorded also from the Seychelles Is. 

Notes. This genus of slender, usually 
strikingly bicolored (red and black) carabids 
includes several species widely distributed 
in SE. Asia and the Malay Archipelago. 
They are usually found in grass, reeds, and 
other vegetation growing in water. 



Key to Species of Casnoidea of New Guinea 

1. Color dark with basal Mi or -/-, of elytra red 
(p. 207) ^estroi 

- Color red with head, post-median elytral 
fascia, and sometimes bases of elytra dark 
(the post-median fascia with a pale spot on 
each elytron) 2 

2. Pronotum conspicuously punctate (p. 207) 
ptiHcticollis 

- Pronotum not conspicuously punctate 3 

3. Elytra not dark at l)ase (p. 208) -. 

( nigrofasciaia ) 

- Elytra dark at base (p. 208) _.... (imJira) 

Casnoidea gesfroi (Maindron) 

Maindron 1910, Bull. Soc. Ent. France for 1910, 

p. 34 ( Oi)J}ionc(i) . 
Dupuis 1913, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 57, p. 270. 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 79, 

fig. 60 {Ophionea). 
gestiunis Seidlitz 1912, Archiv fiir Naturgeschichte 

77, Part 3, p. 155 (error for gestroi). 

Description. None required here; see 
preceding Key to Species; length c. 7.0- 
7.5 mm. 

Type. From Dilo, Papua, July 1890 (D. 
Loria); presumably in Paris Mas. (not 
seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 7, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 2, 
Kiunga, Fly R., July 15-21, Aug. 1-3, 1957 
(W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). West N. G.: 
1, Waris, S. of Hollandia, 450-500 m, Aug. 
8-15, 1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1, 
Wasian, Vogelkop, Sept. 1939 (Wind, 
M.C.Z.). 

Notes. Tliis distinct species is evidently 
widely distributed in New Guinea and is 
represented also on New Britain (an un- 
described subspecies from Cape Glouces- 
ter) but is unknown elsewhere. 

Casnoidea puncficollis (Sloane) 

Sloane 1923, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South \\'ales 

48, p. 31 (Ophionea). 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 80 

(Ophionea). 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
as in Figure 127; red, head black, elytra 
with broad transverse fascia ( bluish ) black, 
the fascia with an elongate pale fleck on 
each 5th interval, legs bicolored; shining. 



20S Bulletin Miiscmu of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



without reticulate microsculpture. Head 
short, rounded posteriorly; front wrinkled 
anteriorly, impunctate. Prothorax long- 
oval; side margins irregularly indicated 
anteriorly; disc conspicuously punctate. 
Eh/fra punctate-striate. Measurements (New 
Guinean specimen): length c. 7.5; width 
2.1 mm. 

Type. From Burdekin R., Queensland, 
Australia; in Sloane Coll., C.S.I.R.O., Can- 
berra ( seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Kiunga, Fly R., Aug. 1-3, 1957 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. I do not have puncticoUis from 
Australia and have identified the New 
Guinean individual from description. Note 
that C. ^estroi (preceding species) as well 
as puncticoUis occurred at Kiunga. 

iCasnoidea nigrofasciafa (Schmidt-Goebel)) 

Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faumila Coleop. Bir- 
iiianiae, p. 21 (Opiiionea) . 

Aiidrewes 1930, Treubia 7, Suppk-ineut, p. 3'34 
( Ophionea ) . 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1535 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

I.iebki' 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 80, 
fiji. 57 (Opiiiouca ). 

Description. None required here; see 
preceding Key to Sj)ecies. 

Type. From Buruia; in Prague Mus. 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Probably 
does not occur. 

Notes. C. ni<irofasciaia ranges from SE. 
Asia to Java and Borneo. It is apparently 
not recorded bom Celebes or the Moluccas. 
New Guinea is included in the species' 
range by Csiki, but I can find no authority 
for this. 1 suspect that a too-hasty com- 
piler, not noticing the negative, picked 
"New Guinea" out of Andrewes' (1930) 
statement that "I havi' seen no examples 
cithci' hoin Jaj^an or New (iuinea." 

(Casno/c/ea indica (Thunberg)) 

i'lmnbc'ru 1784, Novas Inseclorinn Species .3, p. 
()8, flu. 81 (Altclalms). 



Andrewes 1930, Cat. Indian Insects, Part 18, 
Carabidae, p. 241 {Ophionea). 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1534 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Licbke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 79, 
ti^. 55 ( Ophionea). 

Louwerens 1958, Treubia 24, p. 249 (Moluccas) 
{Oi)]uonea). 

Description. None required here; see 
preceding Key to Species. 

Type. From "India orientali"; presumed 
lost (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Doubtful. 

Notes. This common Oriental carabid 
ranges from SE. Asia including Ceylon 
and Japan to Celel>es and the Moluccas. 
A specimen in the British Museum is labeled 
"Dory, New Guinea" but may be from 
Celebes or the Moluccas ( see Part I of m\ 
"Carabid Beetles of New Guinea," p. 331). 
Other collectors have failed to find the 
species in New Guinea. Andrewes' state- 
ment that indica occurs south to New 
Cruinea is probabh' based on the doubtful 
"Dory specimen. 

Genus BASISTICUS Sloane 

Sloane 1917, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

42, p. 415. 
1923, Proc. I.innean Soc. New South 

Wales 48, p. 30. 
Liebke 19.38, Festschrift Emlirik Strand 4, p. 81. 

Diapiosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Odacant}ia micans Macleay 
( below ) . 

Generic distribution. As of the single 
known species. 

Notes. This genus is close to CU)lliuris 
(sensu Jafo ), from which it differs in luuing 
the lateral margins of the prothora.x entire. 

Basisficus micans (Macleay) 

MacleaN 18()4, 'I'rans. Kwi. Soc. New South Wales 

1, p. 107 (Oducanlha). 
CsiVi 1932, Coleop. ('at., (Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 15.3.5 (see for additional references), 
l.iebke 1938, Festschrift Fnibrik Strand 4, p. 81. 

Description ( lor recognition ouK). Form 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlinfitoii 



209 



of ColUuris; head and prothorax red, base of 
elytra dark reddish, smooth part of elytra 
piceous, antennae red, legs dark with pale 
bases; elytra very coarsely punctate-striate 
in anterior Vs, smooth with striae of minute 
punctules in posterior %; length c. 6.5 mm. 

Type. From Port Denison, northern Aus- 
tralia ( presumably near Bowen, Queens- 
land); probably in Macleay Mus., Sydney 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Rouku, Morehead R., March 1962 (W. W. 
Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). 

Notes. This is an Australian species, well 
known in North Queensland. I have speci- 
mens from the vicinity of Cairns, Mareeba, 
and Townsville. The single individual from 
New Guinea matches Australian ones well. 
In Australia, this insect is found on the 
ground in open woodland; the type was 
"found under dried cow dung." 

Genus CLARENCIA Sloane 

Sloane 1917, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

42, p. 415. 
1923, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South 

Wales 48, p. 30. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1535. 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 81. 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key to Genera; 
note form of large CoUiuris; antennae with 
very long 3rd segments (and see Notes, 
below ) ; £ front tarsi with 3 segments with 
numerous narrow squamae loosely ar- 
ranged (not 2-seriate as in CoUiuris); last 
ventral segment slightly emarginate at apex 
in both sexes, with 1 seta each side in <^ , 2 
in 9 . 

Description. None required here. 

Type .species. Casnonia aliena Pascoe, of 
Australia. 

Generic distribution. Eastern Australia, 
New Guinea. 

Notes. Although only 1 Clarencia is cur- 
rently recognized (Csiki, 1932), 4 species 
are represented in Australian material col- 
lected by me in 1957-1958. One of these 
species (described below as quadridens) 



occurs also in New Guinea, and 1 additional 
species of the genus is endemic in New 
Guinea. 

The antennae of some Australian Clar- 
encia not only have very long 3rd seg- 
ments but also have the 4th segments 
uniquely modified: expanded and obliquely 
truncate at apex so that the 5th segments 
hinge forward, and with the pubescence 
of the 4th segments restricted to the seg- 
ments' anterior edges. This modification 
of the 4th segments is only slightly indicated 
in the New Guinean species, more clearly 
in papua than in quadridens. 

The species of Clarencia are usually 
found in wet places, often by standing 
water, either among wet leaves or in or 
under low vegetation. 

Key to Species of Clarencia of New Guinea 

1. Elytra toothed at sutural and outer-apical 

angles (p. 209) (iiiadridens 

- Elytra not toothed (p. 210) \ni\>iia 

Clarencia quadridens n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 128, with elytra trans- 
versely impressed near base; black, elytra ± 
yellowish at apex but not spotted, epipleuri 
pale, femora pale at base, dark at apex, 
tibiae dark banded with pale, tarsi pale, 
antennae brown darker basally; shining, 
without distinct reticulate microsculpture. 
Head 1.37 and 1.27 width prothorax; front 
with conspicuous V-shaped impression an- 
teriorly, impunctate. Prothorax long, with 
sides swollen behind middle; width length 
0.59 and 0.61; base apex 1.38 and 1.40; 
disc very convex, with fine middle line, 
punctate across base with a few punctures 
along lateral margins and across apex but 
otherwise impunctate. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 2.30 and 2.47; apices obliquely 
sinuate-truncate with outer and sutural 
angles acutely dentate; striae formed by 
lines of punctures anteriorly, obsolete pos- 
teriorly; 3rd intervals with c. 6 and 5th 
intervals with c. 4 seta-bearing punc- 
tures. Legs slender; tarsi above not pubes- 
cent and not sulcate; 4th hind-tarsal seg- 



210 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



ments shallovvly emarginate. Measurements: 
length 10.0-11.5; width 2.8-3.1 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,508) and 14 paratypes from Hollandia, 
West N. G., Jiily-Sept. 1944 (Darhiigton); 
and additional paratypes from West N. G. 
as follows: 4, Hollandia, Apr., May 1945 
(B. Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 2, "Neth. N. G." 
without further locality (T. Aarons, Cal. 
Acad.). 

Additional material. West N. G.: 1 
teneral S , Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 ( Dar- 
lington). Papua: 1 $, Normanby Is., 
Wakaiuna, Sewa Bay, Jan. 1-8, 1957 (W. 
W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 para type from Hollandia. 

Notes. The denticulate elytra distinguish 
this species from all other known Clarencia 
in Australia as well as New Guinea. This 
species occurs in Australia: I have one 
9 from near Cairns, N. Queensland (Dar- 
lington). This Australian specimen and the 
one from Normanby Is. have more yellow 
at apex of elytra than Hollandia speci- 
mens do. 

Clarencia papua n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form c. as in quadridens (above) except 
elytra relatively narrower and not dentate; 
])lack, elytra scarcely paler at apex, legs 
bicolored as in quadridens, antennae brown; 
shining, without distinct reticulate micro- 
sculpture. Head 1.32 and 1.22 width pro- 
thorax; front convex except impressed an- 
teriorly as in quadridens, impunctate. 
Frotliora.x formed as in (juadridens but 
slightly shorter; width lengtli 0.62 and 0.68; 
base/apex 1.37 and 1.41; disc very convex, 
middle line fine, surface closely wrinkled- 
punctate across base, variabK punctate 
across apex, and more extensively punctate 
at sides than in quadridens. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 2.21 and 2.10; ajiices 
oblicjuely sinuate-truncate with outer and 
sutural angl(\s narrowK' rounded; striae 
nearly entire (longer than in (piadridens), 
punctate, the punctures becoming minute 



posteriorly; 3rd and 5th intervals with a 
few seta-bearing punctures. Legs c. as in 
(juadridens. Measurements: length c. 9.0- 
10.0; width 2.5-2.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (U.S.N.M.) and 7 
paratypes (some in M.C.Z., Type No. 31,509) 
from Hollandia, West N. G., Apr., May, 
June (holotype, Apr.) 1945 (B. Malkin); 1 
paratype, same locality, "11/5/44" (W. T. 
Nailon, Fenton Coll.); 1 paratvpe, Yent- 
chan. Main R., Sepik, N-E. N.' G., Feb. 
1965 (R. Hornabrook). 

Additional material. Papua: 2, Lake 
Daviumbu, Fly R., Aug. 19-30, Sept. 11-20, 
1936 (Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.). 

Measured specimens. The c5 holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. See preceding Description for 
details distinguishing papua from quad- 
ridens. Actually, papua may be more closely 
related to undescribed Australian species. 

Genus DICRASPEDA Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1S62, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 35, Part 

2, p. 300. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1536 (see for partial s>n()n\in\ and addi- 
tional references). 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, pp. 43, 

88. 
Mdcroccntra Chaudoir 1869, Revue et Ma.uasin 

Zool. (2) 21, p. 205 (new synonymy). 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, pp. 39, 

100. 
Loxocdia Sloanc 1907, Dcutsihc Ent. Zeitscluitt 

for 1907, pp. 179, 474. 
Pliilcmonki Liebke 1938, Festschrift Enilirik 

Strand 4, pp. 39, 83 (new s>n()n> ni\- ). 

Diagnosis. Form as in Figiu'e 129 but 
somewhat xariable. color black or metallic, 
not maculate. Head: a line costa over each 
eye; antennae with 3rd segments not or 
not much longer than 4th segments. Pro- 
tliora.x moderatelx long; pronotum chan- 
neled at sides and with deep median 
gr()()\('. Elytra: apici's \ariable ( sei' fol- 
lowing Key to Species). Legs: tarsi not 
jKibescent above (Liebke's statenunt that 
tarsi ol Macroccntrd aic pubescent above 
is erroneous); lib hiiid-tarsal segments 
\ariab1y emarginate or lobed (see Notes, 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



211 



below). Secondary sexual characters: $ 
front tarsi narrow, narrowly 2-seriately 
sqiiamulose; 6 with 1, 9 2 setae each side 
last ventral segment. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Of Dicraspeda, D. brunnea 
Chaudoir (see below). Of Macrocentra, M. 
(juadrispinosa Chaudoir, of New Guinea. 
Of Loxocara, L. quadrispinosa Sloane { = 
M. quadrispinosa Chaudoir). Of PhiJemonia, 
P. longiloba Liebke, of New Guinea. 

Generic distribtition. Most diverse in 
New Guinea; several New Guinean species 
reach New Britain, etc.; species of Di- 
craspeda sensu stricto (small forms with 
unanned elytra) occur in Australia, and 1 
(brunnea Chaudoir, below) extends to 
Timor, Java, and the Philippines. 

Notes. The 6 New Guinean species here 
brought together in Dicraspeda are super- 
ficially diverse, differing in form, presence 
or absence of elytral spines, and form of 4th 
hind-tarsal segments. But the differences 
are all gradational (see following para- 
graphs ) , different characters vary indepen- 
dently, and the 6 species all share characters 
given in the preceding Diagnosis. More- 
over, they all inhabit understory foliage 
of rain forest, and I think that they are all 
probably derived from one ancestral stock 
that has diversified in this habitat. Five 
of the species are lowland forms and are 
sympatric, occurring together at Dobodura. 
The sixth species, D. ("Macrocentra") 
violacea (Sloane), occurs at moderate alti- 
tudes in the mountains. 

The elytral apices are obliquely truncate 
with sutural angles usually slightly blunted 
and outer angles obtuse in D. (sensu 
stricto) brunnea. In the 3 species of 
"Philemonia" the sutural angles are either 
slightly blunted (most individuals of longi- 
Joba), variably denticulate (dubia and 
some individuals of other species), or 
spined (typical individuals of bispinosa); 
the outer-apical angles are well formed in 
these species and usually acute in longiloba, 
but not spined. And in the 2 species of 



"Macrocentra' (quadrispinosa and violacea), 
outer-apical as well as sutural angles are 
spined. 

Variation of the 4th hind-tarsal segments 
is noteworthy and is not correlated with 
the insects' size or with form of elytral 
apices. The 4th hind-tarsal segments are 
shallowly emarginate (Fig. 163) in D. 
(sensu stricto) brunnea; very deeply emar- 
ginate with extremely long lobes (Fig. 165) 
in D. ("PJiilemonia" ) longiloba, which re- 
sembles brunnea in size and elytral apices; 
and intermediate but variable in the other 
species (other "Philemonia" and "Macro- 
centra" ) . 

Key to Species of Dicraspeda of New Guinea 

1. Elytra without spines or with spines only at 
sutural angles 2 

- Elytra with spines at sutural and outer-apieal 
angles 5 

2. Fourth hind-tarsal segments emarginate for 
c. Mi segments' length; elytra with sutural 
angles slightly blunted, outer-apical angles 
obtuse; length c. 5.5-6.0 mm (p. 211) - brunnea 

- Fourth hind-tarsal segments more deeply 
emarginate; elytra with sutural angles den- 
ticulate or spined ( except in most longiloba ) ; 
size larger 3 

3. Fourth hind-tarsal segments very long- 
lobed (Fig. 165); sutural angles usually 
blunted; length c. 6.5-7.5 mm (p. 212) .. 
longiloba 

- Fourth hind-tarsal segments with shorter 
lobes; sutural angles denticulate or spined; 
size usually larger -— 4 

4. Fourth hind-tarsal segments with lobes c. 
^2 segments' length; sutural angles denticu- 
late; length 6.5-8.0 mm (p. 212) ilulna 

- Fourth hind-tarsal segments with longer 
lobes; sutural angles spined or denticulate; 
length 8.0-9.5 mm (p. 212) bi.s-pinosa 

5. Color black; tarsi sulcate-carinate above; 
length c. 11-13 mm (p. 213) quadrispinosa 

- Color green-purple; tarsi not sulcate-carinate 
above; length c. 11-12 mm (p. 213) -.. 
violacea 

Dicraspeda brunnea Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1862, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 35, Part 2, 
p. 300. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1536 ( see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 89. 

Description. None required here; note 



212 BiiUctin Museum of Comparative Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



size small; pronotum punctate across base 
and apex and in lateral and median grooves 
but widely smooth at middle; elytral apices 
unarmed; 4th hind-tarsal segments not 
deeply emarginate (Fig. 163); length c. 
5.5-6.0 mm. 

Type. From Celebes; in Oberthiir Coll., 
Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 9, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 
1, Nonnanby Is., Wakaiuna, Sewa Bay, Jan. 
1-8, 1957 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.). 
N-E. N. G.: 1, Wareo, Finschhafen (Rev. 
L. Wagner, S. Australian Mus.). West 
N. G.: 3, Hollandia and vicinity (various 
dates and collectors ) . 

Notes. D. bninnea is recorded from 
Australia (Queensland), Timor, Celebes, 
Java, and Mindanao, and I have specimens 
from Leyte and Luzon and New Britain 
as well as from New Guinea. 

Dicraspeda longiloba (Liebke) 

Liehke 1938, Festschrift Einbrik Strand 4, p. 83 
( F/i ilemonia ) . 

Description. None required here; note 
elytra with sutural angles blunt or at most 
minutely denticulate; 4th hind-tarsal seg- 
ments very long-lobed ( Fig. 165 ) ; length c. 
6.5-7.5 mm. 

Type. From N-E. N. G. ("Deutsch-Neu- 
Guinea"); in Liebke Coll., present location 
unknown (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. G.: 
the type. Papua: 5, Dobodura, Mar.-July 
1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. I have a specimen also from Cape 
Gloucester, New Britain. 

Dicraspeda dubia (Gestro) 

(Jestro 1879, Ann. Mus. Civ. C.cnoa 14, p. 558 

(Odacanlha) . 
Liebke 1938, Festsebrift i;ii.l)rik Strand 4, p. 83, 

fJLC. f:)7 {Fluh'Dionid) . 

Descri])tion. None required here; note 
elytra with sutural angles variably denticu- 
late but not si)ined; 4th hiud-taisal seg- 
ments rather short-lobcd but somewhat 
varia])le; length c. 6.5-8.0 mm. 



Type. From Fly R., presumably Papua; 
in Genoa Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 3, 
Dobodura, Mar.-Julv 1944 (Darlington); 
5, Kokoda, 1200, 1300 ft.. May, Aug., Sept., 
Oct. 1933 (Cheesman). N-E. N. G.: 1, 
Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington); 1, Wau, 
Morobe Dist., 1200 m, Aug. 18, 1961 ( Sed- 
lacek), in light trap. West N. G.: 1, Waris, 
S. of Hollandia, 450-500 m, Aug. 16-23, 
1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1, Xabire, 
S. Geelvink Bay, 0-30 m, July 2-9, 1962 
(Gressitt); 1, Waigeu Is., Camp 1, Mt. Nok, 
2500 ft. ( c. 760 m ), May 1938 ( Cheesman ) . 

Notes. I found this or a closely related 
species also at Bamaga, near the tip of 
Cape York, Australia. 

Dicraspeda bispinosa n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 129; brownish black, legs 
dark, antennae and mouthparts paler 
brown; moderately shining, reticulate mi- 
crosculpture indistinct on head and pro- 
notum, isodiametric or slightK' transverse 
on elytra. Head 1.17 and 1.17 width pro- 
thorax; front irregular!)' impressed anteri- 
orly, impunctate; mentum w ith long narrow 
tooth; ligula 4-setose. Prothorax elongate- 
subquadrate with sides swollen below mar- 
gins; width length 0.99 and 0.98; base ' 
apex 1.19 and 1.12; pronotum strongly con- 
vex, narrowly channeled each side near 
margin and with well impressed middle 
groove; surface punctate chiefly across 
base, slightly at apex. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 2.08 and 2.05; apices obliquely 
sinuate-truncate with sutural angles spiued 
or denticulate, outer-apical angles obtuse, 
and apical margin in part minuteh' d(>nticu- 
late; striae entire, punctate; 3rd inter\als 
3-punctate, the posterior puncture near 
apex. Inner n'i)iij.s full. /.ri,'.v normal; tarsi 
not suleate and not pubescent aboM'; 4th 
hind-taisal segments long-lobed (Fig. 164). 
Secondary sexual cJiaracters as of genus; 
last Ncntral segment with small notch at 
apex in both sexes. Mcdsiircinciils: length 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 213 



(including spines) c. 8.0-9.5; width 2.8- 
3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,510) and 15 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 2, 
Kokoda (Cheesman); 2, Mt. Lamington, 
1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-460 m) (C. T. 
McNamara, S. Australian Mus.). N-E. 
N. G.: 4, Wau, Morobe Dist., 1150, 1200, 
1300 m, dates in Jan., Feb., Oct., 1961, 1963 
(Sedlacek); 1, Finschhafen, Huon Pen., 80- 
200 m, Apr. 13, 1963 (Sedlacek). 

Additional material. N-E. N. G.: 4, 
Finschhafen, 80 m, Apr. 16, 1963 (Sedlacek); 
1, same locality, 80-200 m, Apr. 13, 1963 
(Sedlacek); 3, Pindiu, Huon Pen., dates 
in Apr. 1963 (Sedlacek). 

Mea.sured specimens. The 6 paratype and 
9 holotype from Dobodura. 

Notes. This new species would go in 
Philemonia in Liebke's classification. The 
specimens listed under Additional material 
have the sutural angles of the elytra den- 
ticulate rather than spined, but I think they 
are referable to bispinosa. Note that both 
spined and denticulate forms have been 
found at Finschhafen. 

Dicraspeda quadrispinosa (Chaudoir) 

Chaudoir 1869, Revue et Magasin Zool. (2) 21, p. 

206 ( Macrocentra ) . 
Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift lor 1907, p. 

474 (Macrocentra). 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 100 

( Macrocentra ) . 
Louwerens 1956, Trculiia 23, p. 223 (Moluccas) 

(Macrocentra). 
Loxflcara quadrispinosa Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. 

Zeitschrift for 1907, p. 180. 

Description. None required here; known 
among New Guinean Colliurini by size 
large; color plain black; elytra spined at 
sutural and outer-apical angles; tarsi sul- 
cate-carinate above; length (including 
spines) c. 11-13 mm (rarely shghtly smaller 
or larger). 

Types. Of quadrispinosa Chaudoir, from 
Dorey, West N. G. ( \\'allace ) ; in Oberthiir 
Coll., Paris Mus. Of quadri.spinosa Sloane, 



from Simbang, N-E. N. G.; "returned to 
Dr. Horn (for Bennigsen's collection)" 
(not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common: 
227 specimens from localities on New 
Guinea and Normanby, Ferguson, Wood- 
lark, Rossel, Sudest, and Waigeu Is.; ap- 
parently confined to low altitudes, up to 
700, 750, 800, and 975 m at different 
localities, but none found higher; cnmmnn 
at Dobodura. 

Notes. This characteristic New Guinean 
carabid has been foimd also in the Moluc- 
cas, New Britain, and the Solomons, but 
not Australia. 

Dicraspeda violacea (Sloane) 

Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, 

pp. 181, 474 (Macrocentra). 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 100 

(Macrocentra). 
hahiJis Sloane 1907, Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 

1907, p. 181 (name used in error for violacea). 

Description. None required here; similar 
to preceding (iptadrispinosa) but head and 
pronotum greenish or bluish, elytra purple; 
tarsi not sulcate-carinate above; length c. 
11-12 mm. 

Type. From Sattelberg, N-E. N. G.; "re- 
turned to Dr. Horn (for Bennigsen's col- 
lection)" (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. G.: 
8, Wau, Morobe Dist., 1200, 1300 m, Jan., 
Mar., Apr., June, Sept., Nov., 1961-1963 
(Sedlaceks); 1, Eliptamin Vy., 1665-2530 
m, June 23-30, 1959 (W. W. Brandt, Bishop 
Mus.); 1, Finisterre Rge., Saidor, Kiambavi 
Village, July 22-29, 1958 (\^^ W. Brandt, 
Bishop Mus.); 1, W^areo, Finschhafen (Rev. 
L. Wagner, S. Australian Mus.); 1, Goroka, 
E. Highlands, 5200 ft. (c. 1600 m), J. H. 
Barrett, Dept. Agr. Port Moresby). West 
N. G.: 3, Rattan Camp, Snow Mts., 1150, 
1200 m, Feb.-Mar. 19.39 (Toxopeus); 5, 
Fac Fac, Vogelkop, 100-700 m, June 9, 
1959 (Gressitt and T. C. Maa, Bishop 
Mus.), in light trap; 1, Mt. Baduri, Japen 
Is., 1000 ft., Aug. 1938 (Cheesman). 

Notes. D. violacea apparently replaces 
quadrispinosa above 1000 m altitude in 



214 



Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



New Guinea, Init the two species overlap 
below 1000 m. D. violacea occurs also in 
New Britain (Gaulim, Gazelle Pen., 130 m, 
Nov. 28, 1962, Sedlacek). 

Genus LACHNOTHORAX Motschulsky 

Motsthulsky 1862, fitude Ent. 11, p. 48. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1542 (see for additional references). 
Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 103. 
Jeannel 1948, Coleop. Carabiques de la Region 

Malgache, Part 2, p. 7.56. 

Diaii,nos-is. See Key to Genera of Col- 
liurini of New Guinea; this is the only con- 
spicuously pubescent colliurine in New 
Guinea. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. L. higuttatus Motschulsky, 
of India. 

Generic disfrihtition. Africa and Mada- 
gascar; SE. Asia to New Guinea. 

Notes. The few species of Lachnothorax 
are all very much alike. They are probably 
ground-living, and I suspect that they occur 
by running water. 

Lachnothorax. tokkia Gestro 

Gestro 1875, Ann. Mns. Civ. Cenoa 7, p. 856. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. ('at., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1542 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, p. 101. 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abliandlnngen 28, p. 504. 

Description. None required here; note 
form, color black with pale spot before 
apex each elytron, and consjiicuous pubes- 
cence; length c. 5.0-5.5 mm. 

Type. From Kandari, SE. Celebes; in 
Genoa Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. N-E. N. (i.: 
7, Stephansort, Astrolabe Bay, 1900 (Biro). 

Notes. Lachnothorax tokkia has been r(^- 
corded previously from the Malay Pen.. 
Sumatra, Java, and Celebes, and a ver\ 
closely relat(>d species {hi<iuttata Motschul- 
sky) occurs in India and Geylon. 

Genus EUDALIA Castelnau 

Caslelnan 1867, Notes on Australian Coleop., p. 16. 
Sloane 1917, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 



42, pp. 415, 417-422 (with key to Australian 
species ) . 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1542 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Liebke 1938, Festschrift Embrik Strand 4, pp. 44, 
105. 

Diapiosis. See Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Odacantha latipennis Mac- 
leay, of Australia. 

Generic distribution. Australia (c. 6 
species ) and New Guinea ( 1 species, 
doubtfully assigned to this genus). 

Notes. The species described below as 
Eudalia anomala has entire lateral pro- 
thoracic margins and therefore runs to 
Eudalia in Liebke's key, but if the margins 
were obsolete, it would run to Andrewesia, 
to which it may be more closely related. 
{Andrewesia ohcsa (Andrewes) ranges 
from the Malay Pen. to the Moluccas.) 
Generic characters and limits in this group 
(as in so many others!) need revision. 

Eudalia anomala n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 130; 
black, elytra faintly aeneous and tipped 
with yellow, legs testaceous, antennae 
brown paler at base; h(>ad and pronotum 
shining and without reticulate microsculp- 
ture, elytra duller with isodiametric meshes. 
Head 1.18 and 1.17 width prothorax; 
strongly constricted at neck; antennae with 
segments 3 and 4 sube(jual, pubescent from 
4th segmcMits; mandibles moderate^ in knigth 
and curvature; front eon\ex, irregularly 
impressed anteriorK', impunetate; mentuin 
with moderate tooth; liguJa broad, with 2 
long and 2 shorter setae; palpi slender, not 
pubescent. Protliorax suborbicular except 
parallel at base; width length 0.89 and 
0.90; base apex 1.25 and 1.26 (sides of pro- 
thorax curve into condyle of neck at apex); 
lateral margins narrow but (Mitire, with a 
seta-bearing pimcture inside margin (on 
disc) before middle; disc \('ry convex, 
strongly transverseh- impressed at base; 
middle line slightly impressed; surface 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Daiiinaiott 



215 



punctate across base, impunctate or nearly 
so elsewhere. Elytra ample; width elytra, 
prothorax 2.15 and 2.16; apices obliquely 
truncate with outer angles obtuse and 
inner angles acute-blunted; striae entire, 
punctate; 3rd intervals with 4 or 5 seta- 
bearing punctures including 1 near base. 
Inner winp,s full. Legs moderate; tarsi not 
pubescent above and not sulcate; 4th hind- 
tarsal segments emarginate but not lobed. 
Secondary sexual characters: i front tarsi 
narrow, 2-seriately squamulose; last ventral 
slightly emarginate at apex in 6 , not in $ , 
with 1 seta each side in i , 2 in 9 . Mea- 
surements: length c. 7.0; width 2.5 mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (A.M.N.H.) and 1 
i paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,511) 
from Menapi, Cape Vogel Pen., Papua, 
0-30 m, "No. 1," Aug. 8-11, 1953 (Geoffrey 
M. Tate); and 1 9 i^aratype from Wasian, 
Vogelkop, West N. G., Sept. 1939 (Wind, 
M.C.Z.). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
9 paratype. 

Notes. For possible relationships of this 
species, see under genus. This species is 
smaller and much less punctate and less 
roughened above than any typical (Aus- 
tralian) Eudalia known to me, and the 
New Guinean species has the outer-apical 
elytral angles more angulate. 

DOBODURA n. gen. 

Diagnosis. See Key to Genera of Col- 
liurini of Netv Guinea. 

Description. Form ( Fig. 131 ) c. as in 
some CoUiuris. Head without supraocular 
costae; mandibles long, slender, weakly 
arcuate; antennae very long, 3rd segments 
c. V4 longer than 4th segments, 1st segments 
with 1 long seta near apex; mentum with 
triangular tooth; ligula rounded, with 2 long 
setae at apex and 2 shorter setae laterally; 
paraglossae small, membranous; palpi slen- 
der, not pubescent. Prothorax: lateral mar- 
gins entire; median impressed line fine; 
base deeply transversely channeled with 
transverse ridge behind channel. Elytra 



spined. Inner icings full. Legs slender; 
tarsi not pubescent above, not sulcate 
above; 4th hind-tarsal segments moderately 
emarginate, emargination c. '/•; length of 
segment; claws not toothed. Secondary 
sexual characters: 6 front tarsi scarcely 
dilated, 3 segments narrowly 2-seriately 
squamulose; last ventral segment of $ 
weakly, of 9 subcircularly emarginate, 
with 1 seta each side in i , 2 in 9 . 

Type species. D. armata (below). 

Generic distribution. The single species 
is known only from New Guinea. 

Notes. This striking new genus may be 
related to Eudalia but differs in form, 
longer and less arcuate mandibles, much 
longer antennae with relatively longer 3rd 
segments, and presence of elytral spines. 
The position of the principal spines, c. 
opposite the ends of the 4th intervals 
rather than at the sutural or outer-apical 
angles, is unusual in this tribe. 

Dobodura armata n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 131; black above and 
below, appendages testaceous except femora 
dark on inner sides; shining, reticulate 
microsculpture absent or indistinct on most 
of upper surface, present and c. isodiametric 
on elytra posteriorly. Head 1.07 and 1.06 
width prothorax; front evenly convex except 
slightly impressed anteriorly, impunctate; 
neck slightly constricted. Prothorax suboval, 
swollen at sides below margins; width 
length 0.92 and 0.91; base/apex 1.14 and 
1.15; margins each with seta-bearing punc- 
ture c. -o from apex; disc c. evenly convex, 
impunctate. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
2.00 and 2.09; apices with sutural and outer 
angles denticulate or short-spined and with 
long spines c. opposite ends 4th intervals; 
striae entire, formed by lines of fine punc- 
tures; 3rd intervals with 3 well spaced 
seta-bearing punctures. Secondary sexual 
characters as of genus; S copulatory organs 
as in Figure 180. Measurements (types); 
length (including spines) c. 10.5-11.5; 
width 3.3-3.5 mm. 



216 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Types. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,512) and 5 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
2 paratvpes, Mt. Hansemann, Astrolal^e 
Bay, N-E. N. G. (Biro). 

Additional material. West N. G.: 1 $ , 
mountain slope above Bernhard Camp, 100 
m, Apr. 8, 19.39 (Toxopeus). 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. My specimens were taken among 
spray-drenched stones beside small torrents 
in rain forest. 

The specimen from Bernhard Camp has 
the strial punctures of the elytra coarser 
than in the types and the tip of the aedeagus 
slightly different. Additional material may 
sho\\' it to represent a distinguishable sub- 
species. 

Tribe DRYPTiNI 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1548 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carabicjues de le Region 
Malgache, Part 3, p. 1063. 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlunyen 2S, p. 4S1. 

Halm 1967, Fanna Jap<"iica, Caral)idae, Trun- 
eatipennes Group, p. 266. 

Drypfiddc Jeannel 1942, Faune de France, Coleop. 
Carabicjues, Part 2, p. 1098. 

Dryptimie Basilewsky 19.53, Exploration Pare Na- 
tional rUpemba, Ease. 10, Carabidae, p. 228. 

Members of this small but widely distrib- 
uted tribe (represented in New Cuinea 
by only 2 genera) are easily recognized by 
characteristic form (P'ig. 132); pubescent 
surface; antennae with very long 1st and 
very short 2nd segments; and elytra with- 
out raised outer margins. The New Guinean 
species live chiefly in grass, 1 think. They 
are winged and probably diurnal. 

Key to (;kni:ha of Dkyi'tim ok New Guinea 

I. CHaws simple (p. 216) _ /);■(//)/« 

- Claws pectinate (p. 218) Dcscra 

Genus DRYPTA Latreille 

Latreille 1796, Precis Caracteres Generiqnes In- 

sectcs, p. 75. 
Csiki 1932, Coleop. (]at., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1.548 (see lor additional reterences). 



Andrewes 1936, Proc. R. Ent. Soc. London (B) 

5, p. 134 (key to "Indian" species). 
See also references under tribe. 

Diaiinosis. See characters given for tribe 
and in preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Carahus dentatus Rossi, of 
Europe, etc. 

Generic distribution. Tropical and warm 
temperate regions of the Old World; 1 
species listed from Brazil. 

Notes. The Oriental-Australian species of 
Drypta are much alike, differing chiefly in 
proportions and color. 

Key to Species of Drypta of New Guinea 

1. Head, prothorax, and elytra blue-green (p. 
216 ) fkipua 

- Head and prothorax red; elytra brown, 
black, blue-black, or striped 2 

2. Elytra broadly longitudinally striped with 
red (p. 217) _ inaatcrsi 

- Elytra not striped 3 

3. Less slender ( prothoraeic width dength r. 
0.78 or more); femora dark (p. 217) fumi^ata 

- More slender ( prothoraeic width length c. 
0.7.5 or less); femora pale (p. 217) siilcicollis 

Drypta popua n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 132, c. average in genus; 
greenish blue, appendages yellow with 
apices of femora and of 1st antennal seg- 
ments narrowly darker; entire upper sur- 
face closely punctate. Head 1.09 width 
prothorax; eyes moderate, genae convex. 
Protliora.x subcylindric; width length 0.76; 
base apex 1.08; lateral margins indistinct; 
middle line poorly defined. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 2.09; apices obliciueK sub- 
truncate with outer angles obtuse-blunted 
and sutmal angles c. right; striae impressed, 
coarsely ver\ closely punctate; inten^als 
more finely, less closely punctate. Le^s: 
tarsi not sulcate abo\(>; 4th hiud-tarsal seg- 
ments long-lobed; claws cm\(>d, not pecti- 
nate, each w ith obtuse angulation of innc^r 
edge near base but with no trace of teeth. 
Secondary sexual characters not determined 
{a unknown). Measurements: length 8.5; 
w idth 2.7 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea 



Darlington 



217 



31,513) from Lae, N-E. N. G., Oct. 1944 
(Darlington); the type is unique. 

Notes. I am not sure of the relationships 
of this unexpected species. In Andrewes' 
( 1936 ) key to "Indian" species of Drijpta 
(see reference under genus), papua runs 
to couplet LS ( 19 ) but fits neither species 
there named, having a relatively narrower 
head and broader prothorax than aeiheria 
Andrewes (of Assam) and more closely 
punctate elytral intervals than cijanopa An- 
drewes (of Bengal). Drypta papua does 
not resemble any Australian species of the 
genus. It does superficially resemble 
Desera cleg,ans Sloane (below) but is 
smaller, with relatively broader prothorax 
and obtuse rather than acute outer-apical 
elytral angles, and of course with simple 
rather than pectinate tarsal claws. 

Drypta mastersi Macleay 

Macleay 1871, Trans. Ent. Soc. New South Wales 

2, p. 82. 
Chaudoir 1877, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 52, Part 1, 

p. 257. 

Description. None rec^uired here; note 
elytra striped with red; length (of New 
Guinean specimen) c. S.5 mm. 

Type. From Gayndah, South Queensland, 
Australia; presumably in Macleay Mus., 
Sydney (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Rouku, Morehead R., W. Papua (opposite 
the tip of Cape York), Apr. 1962 (W. W. 
Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). 

Notes. In Australia, mastersi ranges north 
at least to mid-peninsular Cape York. I 
do not know whether it is really distinct 
from Drypta australis Dejean of more-south- 
ern Australia. 

Drypta fumigata Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 720. 
Chaudoir 1877, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 52, Part 
1, p. 258. 

Description. None required here; length 
13.5-15.0 mm. 

Type. From Andai, Papua, Aug. 1872 
(Beccari and D'Albertis); in Genoa Mus. 
(not seen). 



Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 3, 
Dobodura, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); 5, 
Kiunga, Fly R., dates from Julv 23 to 
Sept. 25, 1957 (W. W. Brandt,' Bishop 
Mus.); 1, Owen Stanley Rge., Goilala, 
Rome, 1950 m, Apr. 1-15, 1958 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1, Popondetta, N. 
Dist., Jan. 29, 1965 (R. Hornabrook). N-E. 
N. G.: 1, Erima, Astrolabe Bay, 1896 
(Biro); 1, Chimbu Vv., Bismarck Rge., 
5000-7500 ft. (c. 1500-2300 m), Oct. 1944 
(Darlington); 1, Aiyura, E. Highlands, 
5600 ft. (c. 1700 m), "9.10.1960" (J. H. 
Barrett, Dept. Agr. Port Moresby), at light; 

2, Okapa, June 23, 1965 (R. Hornabrook). 
West N. G.: 2, Hollandia, Apr., May 1945 
(R. Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 32, Sansapor, Aug. 
1944 (Darlington). 

Notes. This species is presumably of 
Oriental origin, but I cannot determine to 
which Oriental species it is most closely 
related. 

Drypta suicicollis Putzeys 

Putzeys 1875, Ann. Mus. Civ. Genoa 7, p. 721. 
Chaudoir 1877, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 52, Part 1, 
p. 258. 

Description. None required here; length 
c. 10.5-11.5 mm. 

Type. From Andai, Papua, Aug. 1872 
( Reccari and D'Albertis ) ( note locality 
same as for type of fumigata); in Genoa 
Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
Dobodura, Mar.-Julv 1944 (Darlington); 

3, Kiunga, Fly R., Aug. 1-3, 14-17, 1957 
(W. W. Rrandt, Bishop Mus.). N-E. N. G.: 

1, Erima, Astrolabe Bay, 1897 (Biro); 1, 
Stephansort, Astrolabe Bay, 1897 (Biro). 
West N. G.: 1, Hollandia-Binnen, 25 m, 
Oct. 16, 1957 (Gressitt); 1, Humboldt Bay 
Dist., 1934 (British Mus.); 3, Tor R. 
(mouth), 4 km E. of Hoi Maffen, July 2, 
1959 (T. C. Maa, Rishop Mus.). at light; 

2, Wasian, Vogelkop, Sept. 1939 (Wind, 
M.C.Z.). 

Notes. This species too is probably de- 
rived from an Oriental (not Australian) 
stock, but I do not know its exact relation- 
ships. 



218 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Genus DESERA Hope 

Hope 1831, Zoological Mistellany, p. 21. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Haipalinae 7, 

p. 1553 (see for additional references). 
Andrewes 1936, Proc. R. Ent. Soc. London ( B ) 

5, p. 136 ( kev to "Indian" species). 

1939, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (11) 3, p. 133. 

Dendrocelhis Schmidt-Goebel 1846, Faunula 

Coleop. Birmaniae, p. 24. 

Diafinosis. Characters as of Drijpta, ex- 
cept cla\\'s pectinate. 

Description. None required here. 

Ty))e .species. Dcsera nepalen.si.s Hope, 
of SE. Asia (see following Note.s). 

Generic distribution. SE. Asia to Aus- 
tralia; Africa. 

Note.s. Dcsera differs from Drypto ap- 
parently only in having pectinate tarsal 
claws. A modern revision of the species is 
needed to show whether both genera are 
really nionophyletic and distinct. 

Andrewes ( 1939 ) outlines the history of 
the name Dcsera. It was used by Hope 
( 1S31 ) in combination with the valid de- 
scription of a new species ( )icpalcnsis, 
which is therefore the type species), and 
the combined description iricludes refer- 
ence to the pectinate tarsal claws. This 
use validates Dcsera Hope 1831 under 
Article 16(a) (VI) of the 1964 edition of 
the International Code of Zoological No- 
menclature. 

A single, common species ol this genus 
occurs in New Cuinea. 

Desera elegans (Sloane) 

Sloanc 1907, Dcutsilic Knt. Zcitsclirilt lor 1907, 

p. 473 ( Dcii(lrocclliis). 
Andrewes 1927, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (9) 19, p. 

110. 

Description ( for recognition only). With 
characters of tribe and genus; form slender; 
green (sometimes l^lue-green or l)roiv/e- 
green), antennae red with 1st segment dark 
at apex, legs red with knees usualK' darker 
(legs and antennae sometimes more ex- 
tensively dark); knigth c. 9.5-10.5 mm. 

Ty])C. Froiu Haining Berge, Cazelle Pen., 
New Itritaiii; in Deutsche Ent. Instituti', 



Berhn-Dahlem (Andrewes 1927) (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Common: 
197 specimens from many localities widely 
scattered over New Guinea, from sea level 
to c. 1700 m altitude; occurs at Dobodura 
and \\'au. 

Notes. Desera clciians of New Guinea, 
New Britain, and New Ireland is similar 
to genicidata King (SE. Asia to the Moluc- 
cas) on one side and to smaraiidula 
Chaudoir (Australia) on the other. In fact 
a single individual from Rouku, Morehead 
R., West Papua, Apr. 1962 ( W. W. Brandt, 
C.S.I.R.O. ) looks more like the Australian 
smarag,dula than like the New Guinean 
elegans. Relationships (or identities?) of 
these and other similar species in the 
whole Asiatic-Australian area need further 
study. 

Tribe ZUPHIINI 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1562 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Habn 1967, Fanna Japonica, Carabidae, Tnm- 
catipennes Gronp, p. 253. 

Ztiphiidae Jeannel 1942, Fanne de France, Coleop. 
Carabiqnes Part 2, p. 1091. 

ZitpJiiitac Jeannel 1949, Coleop. Carabiciues de la 
Region Malgaelie, Part 3, p. 1047. 

Ziiphiiuae Basilewsky 1953, Fxploration Pare Na- 
tional I'l'pcniba I'^ase. 10, p. 224. 

This is another small but wideK distrib- 
uted tribe. Its characters and taxonomic 
liiuits need not be discussed here. It is 
represented in New Cuinea by 2 easily 
recognized genera and a total ol 6 known 
species. 

The members of the tribe \\\r in wt't 
places, often among dead lea\cs on tlu' 
ground {Yjipliiuni) or in gniss and vegeta- 
tion growing in water (Planctes). Most 
sjieeies, including all those in New Cluinea, 
are winged. 

K\:\ ro Ckmvuv oi /.ii'iium oi Niw Guinea 

1. Head Mil)triangiilar, \cr\ wide at base: eKtra 

not eostate (p. 219) Zujiliitnii 

- Head normal; elytra wilii Mian> line (.ostac 
(p. 220) '- - I'laiictcs 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 219 



Genus ZUPHIUM Latreille 

Latreille 1806, Genera Crustaceorum et Iiisectonim 
1, p. 198. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caiabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1562 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. Abhandlungen 28, p. 477. 

See also references under tribe. 

Diagnosis. Form (Fig. 133) diagnostic; 
and see preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Carahus oJens Rossi, of 
Europe, etc. 

Generic distribution. All tropical and 
some temperate regions of the world. 

Notes. The various Oriental and Austra- 
lian species of Zuphium are not well under- 
stood. For example, the 7 listed Australian 
species were all described between 1867 
and ISScS, most of them from single speci- 
mens or single localities, and they have 
never been revised. The real relationships 
of the 2 New Guinean species are therefore 
doubtful, although I have made some com- 
parisons. 

Besides the 2 species recorded from New 
Guinea below, I have seen (British Mus.) 
1 specimen of Zuphium celehense Chaudoir 
labeled as from Dory, presumably collected 
by Wallace. I think this specimen is prob- 
ably really from Celebes ( see Part I of my 
"Garabid Beetles of New Guinea," pp. 330- 
331 ) , and I see no reason to list the species 
from New Guinea even tentatively. 

Key to Species of Zuphium of Ne\v Guinea 

1. Large (c. 8.3 mm); color piceous (p. 
219 ) thouzeti 

- Small (c. 3.5 mm); color brown (p. 219) 

simiinu 

Zuphium thouzeti Castelnau 

Castelnau 1867, Notes on Australian Coleop., p. 17. 

1868, Trans. R. Soc. Victoria 8, p. 103. 

Description. None required here. Note 
size large; color dark, not spotted; length 
(of New Guinean specimen) c. 8.3 mm. 

Types. From Rockhampton, Queensland, 
Australia; present location of type un- 
known (not seen). 



Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1 
9, Port Moresby, Feb.-May 1943 {W. B. 
Jones, U.S.N.M.). 

Notes. Besides the types from Rock- 
hampton, Gastelnau had a specimen from 
Port Denison (near Bowen) farther north, 
and I have specimens (identified from de- 
scription) from W. of Ravenshoe and N. of 
Mareeba still farther north in Queensland. 
The Port Moresby specimen agrees rea- 
sonably well with my Australian ones ex- 
cept that the color of the legs varies. 

Zuphium sinuum n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 133, very 
small; brown, head slightly darker, append- 
ages and lower surface paler; dull, entire 
upper surface densely microreticulate or 
roughened. Head 0.92 and 0.94 width pro- 
thorax; antennae short, middle segments c. 
2x long as wide; surface densely micro- 
reticulate, moderately punctulate. Pro- 
thorax: width/length 1.13 and 1.10; base/ 
apex 0.88 and 0.81; posterior angles right- 
acute and not quite basal ( base very briefly 
subpedunculate); surface closely roughened- 
punctate. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.65 and 1.70; apices sinuate at middle of 
width, lobed between sinuations and suture; 
surface roughened, striae indicated but not 
well defined. Secondary sexual characters: 
i front tarsi slightly dilated, 3 segments 
with soles of dense short squamae; c^ with 
1, 9 2 setae each side last ventral segment. 
Measurements: length c. 3.5; width 1.3- 
1.4 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.G.Z., Type No. 
31,514) from Aitape, N-E. N. G., Aug. 1944 
(Darlington); and 1 6 paratype, Kota 
Nika, Res. Hollandia, West N. G., Jan. 31, 
1956 (R. T. Simon Thomas, Louwerens 

GolL). 

Measured specimens. The S paratype and 

9 holotype, in this order. 

Notes. This species or a close relative 
occurs also at Cape Gloucester, New Brit- 
ain. Small size, color, dull surface, and 
sinuate elytral apices distinguish sinuum 
from other comparable species including 



220 BuUc'tin Mu.scin)i of Comparative Zoolog,!), Vol. 137, No. 1 



cclc'])cnsc Chaudoir (see under genus), in 
whieh the elytral apices are scarcely sinuate. 
Z. inconspicuum Schmidt-Goebel of Burma, 
etc., has strongly sinuate elytral apices but 
is much more shining than .sintiinn. 

Genus PLANETES Macleay 

Macleay 1825, Aniuilosa Javanica, p. 28. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caiahidae, Harpalinat- 7, 
p. 1567 (see for syiuiiiyiiiy and aclclitional refer- 
ences). 

Jcdiieka 1963, iMit. Ahhandlnnuen 28, p. 464. 

Di(ii!,n()si.s. Form c. as in Figure 134; 
elytra each with more than 20 line longitu- 
dinal costae. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. P. himacuJatus Macleay, 
of Java, etc. 

Generic distrihution. SE. Asia including 
Oylon and Japan to northern Australia; 
Africa. 

Notes. Most and most diverse species of 
Planetes occin- in the Oriental Region. Four 
species, all rather small and imspotted, are 
known in New Guinea. And only I or 2 
species, the same as or close to New 
Guinean lorms, ha\t' l)een found in Aus- 
tralia. This geographic pattern suggests 
dispersal from Asia to Australia. 

The species of this genus that I have 
collected live in swamps and beside stand- 
ing water. The\' are \\inged and often fly to 
light. 

In the present work I have not distin- 
guished Uetero^Jossa Nietner from Planetes, 
although the two probably are distinct (see 
Ihibu, 1967, reference cited under tribe). 

Ki;v K) SiM'CiKs OF Planetes ok Nkw CIuinka 

1. Smaller, lenijtli 6.0—7.5 mm; see also l^c- 
■srrii)li()u (p. 220) scccnuiutus 

— Usually larger; // leniilli under 8 mm, 19th 
( posthiimeral ) elytral intervals specially eon- 
sjiieuous 2 

2. Klytra with an interval (the 19th, near 
humeri) more conspieuons than others at 
base; see also Description (p. 220) Iniincidlis 

— Elytra with no single interval more eoii- 
spieuous than others at base 3 

.3. Prothorax subeordate, with sides not oi' 
weakh' sinuate; pronolum more evcuK pmie- 



tate, the punctures rather coarse and of c. 

uniform size (p. 221) . aiistidlis 

- I'rothora.x strongly cordate, with sides stronglj' 
sinuate; pronotum less evenly punctate, with 
coarsi' and fine punctures mixed (p. 221) 
cordens 

Planetes secernendus OberthUr 

Oberthur 1883, Notes Leyden Mus. 5, p. 217. 

Description ( for recognition only ) . Form 
small; sparsely inconspicuously pubescent; 
piceous, not spotted, appendages brownish 
testaceous; prothorax cordate or subeordate, 
pronotum unevenly punctate, the punctures 
varying in size and usually sparser near 
middle of pronotum; elytra each with more 
than 20 fine costae, the costae subequal 
except 1st, 4th, 7th, etc. usualh' sliii^lithj 
wider or more prominent toward base and 
apex, but 1 9th costa not specially con- 
spicuous at base; length r. 6.0-7.5 mm. 

Types. From Sumatra; in Oberthiir 
Coll., Paris Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Sixty-three 
specimens from localities (including Dobo- 
dura) scattered over most of the length of 
New Guinea; at low altitudes only, none 
above 500 in. 

Notes. P. secernendus is now known 
from the Malay Pen. (British Mus.), 
Sumatra, Java (British Mus.), Borneo. 
Leyte and Luzon in the Philippines 
(M.C.Z.), New Guinea, and New Britain 
(M.C.Z. ). Geographic \;uiation probably 
occurs but is confused 1)\ iiidi\idual \aria- 
tion especialK (in New (Guinea) in form 
and pimctation ol prothorax. See also Addi- 
tional material and Notes under /'. humer- 
al is. below. 

Plonefes humeralis n. sp. 

nescri))lion. With characters ol genus; 
ionn as in preceding species (seeenioidus), 
reddish biown, sometimes darkcM', append- 
ages slightK i^aler; head and pronotum 
shining betwcHMi piuictures, eKlia duller. 
lle(ul 0.77 and 0.7(S w idth prothorax, \\ eakly 
impressed across base; I rout comex, slightly 
impressed anleriorly, slightK irregularly 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



221 



finely punctate. Protlwrax narrowly sub- 
cordate; width length 1.25 and 1.26; base 
apex 1.06 and 1.05; sides broadly arcuate 
anteriorly, moderately sinuate posteriorly, 
with moderate margins, each with usual 2 
setae; disc slightly convex, with middle line 
well impressed but lateral longitudinal im- 
pressions vague; baso-lateral impressions 
moderate, roughened; surface of disc mod- 
erately punctate with punctures of mixed 
sizes, more closely punctate across base and 
apex. Elytra subparallel; width elytra pro- 
thorax 1.35 and 1.37; apices obliciuely trun- 
cate, outer angles broadly rounded, sutural 
angles scarcely blunted; each elytron with 
more than 20 fine costae, the 1st, 4th, 7th, 
etc., slightly more prominent than others 
and the 19th specially prominent (but still 
fine) at base. Secomkinj sexual characters: 

5 front tarsi slightly dilated, 3 segments 2- 
seriately squamulose; 1 principal seta each 
side last ventral segment in both sexes. 
Measurements (of types): length 7.3-8.3; 
width 2.5-2.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (Bishop Mus.) and 
1 £ paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,515) 
from Eliptamin Vy., N-E. N. G., 1200-1350 
m, July 16-31, 1959 (W. W. Brandt); 1 

6 paratype, Torricelli Mts., Mokai Village, 
N-E. N. G., 750 m, Jan. 1-23, 1959 (W. W. 
Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1 $ paratype, Mt. 
Dayman, Maneau Rge., Papua, 700 m, "N. 
Slope No. 6," July 13-20, 1953 (Geoffrey 
M. Tate, A.M.N.H.). 

Additiorml material. N-E. N. G.: 3, 
Krisa, Vanimo, Apr. 1939 (Cheesman). 
West N. G.: 1, Dojo, 2nd Strip, Res. Hol- 
landia, Apr. 15, 1957 (R. T. Simon Thomas, 
Louwerens Coll.). 

Measured specimens. The 6 holotype and 
i paratype from Eliptamin Vy. 

Notes. The diagnostic character of this 
species is the relative conspicuousness of 
one costa (the 19th) at base of each elytron. 
Form, color, punctation, and size are also 
characteristic of the types. However, the 
individuals listed under Additional material 
are darker and much smaller than the types, 
c. 6.5 mm long. They have the 19th costae 



relatively conspicuous, as in the types, but 
otherwise are more like secernendus. More 
material from more localities is needed to 
show wliether these specimens are referable 
to humeralis or to secernendus, or whether 
they represent a separate species. One 
possibility is that humeralis occurs prin- 
cipally at higher altitudes than secernendus 
and that intermediates occur where their 
ranges overlap. 

Planeies ausfralis (Macleay) 

Macleay 1871, Trans. Ent. Soc. New South Wales 
2, p. 82 (PoUsticiis). 

Description. None required here; note 
size, prothorax with sides weakly or not 
sinuate; pronotum c. evenly rather coarsely 
punctate; length (in New Guinea) 7.7-9.5 
mm. 

Type(s). From Rockhampton, Queens- 
land, Australia; presumably in Macleay 
Mus., Sydney (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1, 
L. Daviumbu, Fly R., Sept. 11-20, 1936 
(Archbold Exp., A.M.N.H.). West N. G.: 
1, Kota Nika, Res. Hollandia, Jan. 25, 1956 
(R. T. Simon Thomas, Louwerens Coll.), 
in light trap; 1, Hoi Maffin, near Sarmi, July 
18, 1959 (T. C. Maa, Bishop Mus.). 

Notes. The New Guinean specimens 
agree reasonably well with specimens from 
Cairns, North Queensland, identified as 
australis from description. 

Planetes cordens n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 134, depressed, with 
wide-cordate prothorax; reddish piceous, 
appendages paler; surface inconspicuously 
pubescent (as usual); head and pronotum 
shining between punctures, elytra dull. 
Head 0.76 and 0.79 width prothorax, ir- 
regularly impressed across base; front con- 
vex except irregularly impressed anteriorly, 
with a little irregular fine punctation. Pro- 
thorax: width length 1.42 and 1.44; base 
apex 0.97 and 0.96; sides broadly rounded 
anteriorly, strongly sinuate posteriorly, mod- 



222 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



erately margined, with usual 2 setae; pos- 
terior angles well defined, right or slightly 
obtuse; pronotum weakly convex, with well 
impressed middle line and less distinct lon- 
gitudinal impressions each side nearer mar- 
gin than middle; baso-lateral impressions 
shallow, closely microreticulate; surface of 
disc otherwise rather closely punctate with 
mixture of moderate and minute punctures. 
Eli/fra subparallel; width elytra prothorax 
1.34 and 1.30; apices obliquely truncate 
with outer angles broadly rounded and in- 
ner angles scarcely blunted ( as usual ) ; 
each elytron with more than 20 fine costae, 
the 1st, 4th, 7th, etc. slightly more promi- 
nent than others, but no costa specially con- 
spicuous at base. Secondary sexual char- 
acters as for humcralis (2nd species above). 
Measurements: length c. 9.0-9.5; width 
3.2-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype $, (Hungarian National 
Mus.) and 3 paratypes (2 in M.C.Z., Type 
No. 31,516) from Madang ("Friedrich- 
W'ilh.-hafen"), N-E. N. G., 1896 (Biro); 
and additional paratypes as follows, all 
from N-E. N. G. ( Biro ) : 1, Stephansort, 
Astrolabe Bay, 1900; 1, Simbang, Huon 
Gulf, 1899; 1, Erima, Astrolabe Bay, 1897. 

Meastired specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Stephansort. 

Notes. Among New Guinean Planetes, 
this should be immediately recognized by 
rather large size and wide-cordate prothorax 
with disc flatter than usual and punctate as 
described. Why Biro should have found 
this species at four localities while no one 
else has found it anywhere is a mystery. 
Perhaps he obtained his specimens in a 
special habitat b\' sjx'cial collecting methods, 
perhaps by sitting leaf-debris from the 
ground in rain forest. 

Tribe HELLUODINI 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpaliiiac 7, 
p. 1571 (sec for synoiiyiiiy and additional iclcr- 
cnces ) . 

This is a small tribe, confined to thv 
tropical Asiatic-Australian area. ()iil\- 3 



genera are recognized, of which only 1 is 
represented in New Guinea and ( northern ) 
Australia. However, Iloloponerus fiodef- 
froyi (Fairmaire) (1881, Le Naturaliste 3, 
p. 381; 1883, Ann. Soc. Ent. Belgium 27, p. 
2) of New Britain, although considered a 
lebiine by Fairmaire and listed as one in 
the Coleopterorum Catalogus (Csiki 1932, 
p. 1361 ), may belong in this tribe. I do not 
know this insect, but the description is of a 
large carabid (perhaps the largest member 
of the family in New Britain), 28 mm long, 
with long mandibles, prothorax expanded 
at sides, elytra sinuate-truncate and not 
spined, and head at base with a strong 
spine on each side. This description sug- 
gests a very large Poi:,onoglossus-\ike carabid 
with genae, which are prominently angu- 
late or tuberculate in some Pogonoglossus, 
produced as spines. 

Genus POGONOGLOSSUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1862, Bull. Soc. Nat. Moscow 35, Part 
2, p. 304. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpaliiiae 7, 
p. 1571 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Andrewes 1937, Bull. Soc. Ent. France for 1937, pp. 
152// (with key to species of Ja\a and Sumatra). 

Diaiinosis. Form including form of eyes 
characteristic; upper surface at least partly 
pubescent; antennae not geniculate, with 
moderate 2nd segments; see description of 
ligula and paraglossae, below. 

Description (characters common to New 
Guinean species). Form as in Figures 135- 
140; variably pubescent. Head: eyes ± 
abruptly prominent, genae rounded or an- 
gulate-tubereulate behind eyes; 2 setae over 
each eye; antennae not gtmiculate, 2nd seg- 
ments moderate (not \('r\ short), segments 
1-4 variably setulose, outer segments mor(> 
densely pub(>seent; mandibles long, weakly 
arcuate; neck deeply transxcrseK con- 
stricted; front 2-impressed anterior!) ; 
clypeus irregularly truncate, apparenth 
2- or 4-setose anteriorU- (setae difficult 
to distinguish Ironi other jMibescence ); 
labium \ ariable. 6-sc>tose; ineiituin with 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 223 



triangular tooth; ligiila short, rounded, with 
c. 4 setae at apex and 2 more near middle 
of length; paraglossae very slender, much 
longer than and free from ligula; palpi 
with apical segments narrowly subtruncate. 
Prothorax cordate or subcordate; apex 
slightly or moderately (not deeply, in New 
Guinean species) emarginate, with anterior 
angles usually rounded ( ± pointed in some 
g,lobncoUis) and not or not much advanced 
beyond arc of emargination; base subtrun- 
cate or emarginate at middle, ± oblique at 
sides; posterior angles or sides of prothorax 
just before angles usually minutely emar- 
ginate; margins moderate or wide, reflexed, 
each with seta at base and before middle; 
disc usually only weakly convex, with mid- 
dle line and transverse impressions distinct, 
baso-lateral impressions present Init not 
sharply defined. Elytra quadrate; margins 
usually faintly subserrate; apices obliquely 
emarginate-truncate with membranous mar- 
gins, with outer angles usually rounded 
(obtuse in popiio), inner angles c. acute or 
blunted, not armed; striae entire ( ± obso- 
lete in unicolor and globricoUis); intervals 
variably punctate, 3rd with up to 3 or 4 
special dorsal punctures (often not distin- 
guishable especially in species with exten- 
sive general punctation). Inner uiniis full. 
Lower siu-jace variably punctate-pubescent. 
Legs moderately slender; tarsi pubescent 
above, not sulcate above; 4th hind-tarsal 
segments shallowly emarginate; 5th seg- 
ments setulose above and below; claws 
simple. Secondary sexual characters: S 
front tarsi not or not much widened, 3 seg- 
ments narrowly 2-seriately squamulose; S 
usuallv with 2 or 3, 9 3 or 4 setae each 
side last ventral segment, but these setae 
and their punctures sometimes difficult to 
distinguish. 

Type species. P. validicornis Chaudoir, 
of Java. 

Generic distribution. SE. Asia to north- 
ern Australia. 

Notes. Species of this genus are probably 
moderatelv numerous and diverse from the 



SE. corner of Asia to New Guinea (fewer 
in northern Australia), but individuals are 
rarely collected. Of 9 Javan and Sumatran 
species, Andrewes ( 1937 ) saw only single 
specimens of 6; and of 9 (or 10, with 
unicolor (Macleay) ) New Guinean species, 
I have seen a satisfactory series of only 1. 
All the New Guinean species appear to be 
endemic. I compared some of them with 
the Andrewes Collection in 1948 ( see Notes 
under several species, below); none fits 
the description of P. horni Sloane ( 1907, 
Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, p. 184) 
of New Britain; and the 2 Australian species 
that I have seen are different from any New 
Guinean species. 

Key to Species of Pogonoglossus of 
New Guinea 

1. Elytra] striae distinct, impressed 2 

- Elytral striae faint or absent 9 

2. Genae rounded or irregular behind eyes but 
not conspicuously angulate or tuberculate 
(see Description of taylori) 3 

- Genae conspicuously angulate or tuberculate . 7 

3. Entire upper surface including much of 
head rather closely punctate or (on elytra) 
roughened 4 

- Part or all of upper surface sparsely punctate 
or impunctate 6 

4. Elytra with outer-apical angles obtuse but 
distinct; size medium (length 9.0-11.5 mm); 
(found at low altitudes) (p. 224) painia 

- Elytra witli outer-apical angles rounded; 
size either larger or smaller; (often at higher 
altitudes ) 5 

5. Larger, length 12.3-13.0 mm (see also De- 
scription) (p. 224) taylori 

- Smaller, length 7.6-8.7 mm (see also De- 
scription) (p. 225) ininor 

6. Prothorax less wide (width/length 1.49), 
with moderate margins (p. 225) major 

- Prothorax very wide (width/length 1.88 and 
1.97), with very wide margins (p. 225) latior 

7. Sides of prothorax oblique but scarcely sinu- 
ate posteriorly; length c. 13 mm (p. 226) - 

obliquus 

- Sides of prothorax sinuate posteriorly; 
smaller ° 

8. Length 9.6-11.0 mm (p. 226) grossuliis 

- Length 7.0-9.0 mm (p. 227) parvus 

9. Pronotum densely minutely punctate and 
pubescent (p. 227) unicolor 

- Pronotum virtually impunctate and glabrous 
(p. 227) glahricollis 



224 BuUetin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Pogonoglossus papua n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 135; brownish black, ap- 
pendages dark; entire upper surface mod- 
erately pubescent, punctate, with reticulate 
microsculpture indistinct or (on elytra) ir- 
regular. Head 0.84 and O.Sl width pro- 
thorax; genae rounded, not strongly angu- 
late; front moderately punctate, shining be- 
tween punctures. Prothorax strongly cor- 
date; width/length 1.45 and 1.48; base/apex 
1.14 and 1.19; base broadly slightly emar- 
ginate, slightly oblique at sides; sides 
strongly sinuate well before base; basal 
angles shaiply formed, c. right; margins 
rather wide, moderately reflexed; disc 
weakly convex, surface moderately closely 
punctate-pubescent, less shining than head 
but more shining than elytra. Elytra: 
width elytra prothorax 1.46 and 1.46; outer- 
apical angles obtuse but more distinct than 
usual in genus, striae moderately impressed, 
indistinctly punctulate; intervals slightly 
convex, closely punctate-pubescent. Sec- 
ondary sexual characters as for genus; S 
with 2, 9 3 special seta-bearing punctures 
each side last ventral segment. Mca.siire- 
ments: length c. 9.0-11.5; width 3.4-4.1 
mm. 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,517) and 10 paratypes from Dobodura, 
Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Darlington); and 
additional paratypes as follows. Papua: 1, 
without precise locality (Hungarian Na- 
tional Mus.). N-E. N. G.r 1, Lae, sea level, 
July 24, 1955 (Gressitt), in light trap; 1, 
Busu H., E. of Lae, 100 m, Sept. 13, 1955 
(Gressitt); 7, Aitape, Aug. 1944 (DarHng- 
ton). WestN. G.: 1, Hollandia, July-Sept. 

1944 (13arlingt(m); 2, same locality. May 

1945 (II. Iloogstraal, M.C.Z.); 1, same lo- 
cality, June 1945 ( B. Malkin, U.S.N.M.); 3, 
same locality, dates in Nov., Dec, Jan. 
1944-1945 (W. T. Nailon, Fenton Coll.); 
1, Sentani, 90+ m, June 22, 1959 (Gressitt 
and T. G. Maa, Bishop Mus.), in light trap; 
1, Hoi Maffin, near Sarmi, July 18, 1959 (T. 
G. Maa, Bishop Mus.); 1, Neth. N. G. with- 



out further locality, Oct. 10, 1944 (T. 
Aarons, Gal. Acad.). Also 1, "Sinimi" { = 
Senimi R., Papua?), "Vr, 1943" (T. Niimura, 
Ueno Goll.). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Dobodura. 

Notes. In Andrewes' key ( 1937, see refer- 
ence under genus), this species runs to 
latus Andrewes of Sumatra but has the pro- 
thorax probably narrower at base and less 
emarginate at apex and the pronotum cer- 
tainly more closely punctate. Of Australian 
species, papua is closest to porosus Sloane 
( I have specimens, identified from descrip- 
tion, from Rocky R., mid-peninsular Gape 
York ) but has a more strongly cordate pro- 
thorax and better defined outer-apical 
elytral angles. 

Since papua is the common Poii,ono'jJos- 
sus in New Guinea, I shall take it as a 
standard for comparison of sexeral of the 
following species. 

Most of my Dobodiua specimens were 
taken in piles of dead leaves on the ground 
in rain forest. 

Pogonoglossus taylori n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form and characters c. as preceding species 
{papua) except as follows. Head 0.15 and 
0.78 width prothorax; genae more promi- 
nent than in papua, nearly wide as eyes, 
minutely tuberculate and e. subangulate be- 
hind eyes. Prothorax: width length 1.44 
and 1.58; base/apex 1.18 and 1.18; apex 
slightly more emarginate than in ))apua 
and sides slightly more broadl\ and e\enl> 
reflexed. Elytra: width elytra prothorax 
1.43 and 1.43; outcM-apical angles more 
rounded than in papua. Measurenwnis: 
length 12.3-13.0; 4.3-4.9 mm. 

Types. Holotype S (M.G.Z., l\pe No. 
31,518) from Aiyura, N-E. N. G.. 'l900 m 
July 1962 (R. W. Taylor, #2147), in rain 
forest; 1 9 paratvpe, Eliptanu'ii \\'., N-E. 
N. G., 1665-2530 m, June 23-30. 1959 (W. 
W. Brandt, Bishop Mus.); 1 s paratvpe, 
Okapa, N-E. N. G., Aug. 29, 1965 (R. 
Hornabrook). 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



225 



Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
9 paratype from Eliptamin Vy. 

Notes. This is apparently a mountain- 
Hving species probably related to the low- 
land papiia but differing from it as indi- 
cated in the Description above. 

Pogonoglossus minor n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus 
(except i unknown); form c. as in papua; 
characters c. as in papna except as follows. 
Color browner (less black), surface slightly 
more shining. Head 0.88 and 0.86 width 
prothorax; eyes slightly smaller and genae 
more evenly rounded than in papiia. Pro- 
thorax: width length 1.47 and 1.49; base 
apex 1.08 and 1.07. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.50 and 1.51; outer-apical angles 
more rounded than in papiia; intervals less 
roughened. Measurements: length 7.6-8.7; 
width 3.0-3.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,519) from lower Busu R., Huon Pen., 
N-E, N. G., May 12, 1955 (E. O. Wilson), 
in lowland rain forest; 1 9 paratype, W'au, 
Morobe Dist., N-E. N. G., 1200 m, June 22, 
1961 (Sedlaceks); 1 9 paratype, Hollandia, 
West N. G., Jan. 20, 1945 (W. T. Nailon, 
Fenton Coll.); 1 9 paratype, Njau-limon, 
S. of Mt. Bougainville, West N. G., 300 ft., 
Feb. 1936 (Cheesman). 

Measured specimens. The 9 holotype and 
9 paratype from Njau-limon. 

Notes. P. minor differs from papua as 
indicated in the preceding Description. 
The 2 species are sympatric but minor is 
apparently the less widely distributed, 
being known only from a comparatively 
small part of east-central New Guinea. 

P. minor is similar also to porosus Sloane 
of North Queensland, Australia, but has the 
head more punctate and the prothorax more 
strongly cordate. 

Pogonoglossus major n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 136; irregular brownish 
piceous, appendages dark brown; rather 



shining, reticulate microsculpture absent or 
indistinct on head and pronotum, light, 
irregular, moderately transverse on elytra; 
surface punctate as described below. Head 
0.82 width prothorax; genae prominently 
rounded but not angulate; front sparsely 
punctate-pubescent. Prothorax weakly cor- 
date; width/length 1.49; base/apex 1.05; 
sides broadly sinuate before obtuse except 
minutely subdenticulate posterior angles; 
surface irregularly rather sparsely punctate- 
pubescent. Elytra: width elytra/prothorax 
1.44; outer-apical angles broadly rounded, 
sutural angles blunted; striae deep, entire, 
finely punctulate; intervals convex, sparsely 
punctate, 3rd with apparently 3 or 4 special 
dorsal punctures difficult to distinguish 
from other punctures. Secondary sexual 
characters: S front tarsi as genus; 6 with 
apparently 3 principal setae on left, 4 on 
right side last ventral segment; 9 unknown. 
Measurements: length 17.5; width 6.0 mm. 

Type. Holotype S (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,520) from vie. Nadzab, N-E. N. G., July 
1944 (Darlington); the type is uniciue. 

Notes. This is the largest New Guinean 
Pogonoglossus. It is about the size of P. 
Jwrni Sloane (Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 
1907, p. 184) of New Britain but has the 
prothorax more narrowed behind with more 
obtuse posterior angles, the outer elytral 
striae not fainter, and the elytral intervals 
sparsely rather than closely setose-punctate. 

Pogonoglossus lafior n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 137, very broad; brownish 
black, appendages dark; moderately shin- 
ing, reticulate microsculpture indistinct on 
head and pronotum, light, fine, rather 
strongly transverse on elytra; punctation as 
described below. Head 0.74 and 0.67 width 
prothorax; genae oblique for most of length, 
slightly rounded or very obtusely subangu- 
late behind eyes; front c. impunctate ex- 
cept sparsely punctate laterally and pos- 
teriorly. Prothorax very wide, cordate; 
width length 1.88 and 1.97; base/apex 1.24 



226 Btilletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



and 1.12; sides strongly but variably sinuate 
well before c. right or obtuse posterior 
angles; margins widely reflexed; disc more 
convex than usual, sparsely inconspicuously 
punctate-pubescent. Elytra: width elytra 
prothorax 1.45 and 1.30; outer-apical angles 
rounded, sutural angles blunted; striae 
entire, well impressed, slightly irregular 
but scarcely punctulate; intervals convex, 
sparsely inconspicuously punctulate, 3rd 
with 3 or 4 dorsal punctures difficult to 
distinguish. Sccundary sexual characters: 6 
front tarsi as for genus; 6 with 3, 9 4 setae 
each side last ventral segment. Measure- 
ments: length 14.5-15.5; width 5.7-6.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype c5 ( Leiden Mus. ) and 
1 9'paratype (M.C.Z., Type No. 31,521) 
from Lower Mist Camp, Snow Mts., West 
N. G., 1550 m, Jan. 31, 1939 (Toxopeus). 

Notes. See Key to Species for distinguish- 
ing characters of this well defined species. 
The 9 has a wider prothorax with more 
obtuse angles than the S , but this is prob- 
ably individual rather than sexual variation. 
I have no doubt the 2 specimens are con- 
specific. 

Pogonoglossus obliquus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 138; black, appendages 
dark; shining, reticulate microsculpture 
absent or indistinct even on elytra; puncta- 
tion as described l)elow. Head 0.77 width 
prothorax; genae prominently angulate- 
tuberculate behind eyes; front almost 
smooth, very sparsely punctulate-pubescent. 
Prothorax very wide; width/length 2.00; 
base/apex 1.22; sides oblicjue and converg- 
ing and scarcely sinuate before obtuse pos- 
terior angles; margins widely reflexed; disc 
moderately convex, sparsely punctate-jm- 
bescent, more closely so across base and 
apex. Ehjtra: width not measured (speci- 
men broken); humeral margins wider ihan 
usual; outer-apical angles roimded, sutural 
angles acute, scarcely blunted; striae entire, 
impressed, irregular but seareel\- punctu- 
late; interxals con\-ex, finely s])arsel\- punc- 



tulate, 3rd with c. 3 special dorsal punc- 
tures difficult to distinguish. Secondary 
sexual cJiaracters: 6 front tarsi as for 
genus; i with 3 setae each side last 
ventral segment; 9 unknown. Measure- 
ments: length c. 13 mm; width not mea- 
sured. 

Ty])e. Holotvpe 6 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Eliptamin Vy.,'N-E. N. G., 1665-2530 m, 
June 23-30, 1959 (W. W. Brandt); the type 
is unique. 

Notes. The single specimen was received 
in bad condition and remounted in pieces 
on a card, but it shows the essential char- 
acters of this very distinct species. See Key 
to Species for its differential characters. 

Pogonoglossus grossulus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form average; black or brownish black, ap- 
pendages dark; shining, reticulate micro- 
sculpture indistinct even on elytra. Head 
0.80 and 0.79 width prothorax; genae promi- 
nently angulate-tuberculate behind eyes; 
front virtually smooth at middle, very 
sparsely punctulate-setose at sides. Pro- 
thorax wide-cordate; width length 1.95 and 
1.94; base/apex 1.23 and 1.19; sides broadly 
sinuate before c. right or obtuse posterior 
angles; margins wide, widely reflexed; disc 
weakly convex, very sparsely punctulate- 
pubescent. Eh/tra: width elytra prothorax 
1.27 and 1.36; outer-apical angles rounded, 
sutural angles acute (except for membranous 
margins); striac> deep, scarcely punctulate; 
intervals convex, very sparsely punctulate, 
3rd with up to 3 special dorsal punctures 
difficult to distinguish. Secondary sexual 
characters as for genus; S with 2, 9 with 3 
setae each side last ventral segment. Mea- 
surcmoils: length 9.6-11.0; width 3.7-4.1 
mm. 

Types. Holotype 9 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,522) Irom \ic. ZcMigarn, \'\-. of Kua H., 
Mongi Watershed, Ihion Pen., I\-K. N. (i.. 
800 m, Apr. 14, 1955 (E. O. Wilson); 1 
9 paratype, Lae, N-E. N. (i.. JuK 1941 
(F. E. Skinner, Purdue V. Coll., borrowed 
fr. Bisho]-) Mus.); 1 ^ paratope. Kokoda. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Daiiington 227 



Papua, 1200 ft. (366 m), Sept. 1933 are distinet in both specimens and may 

(Cheesman). prove to be characteristic of the species, 

Measured specimens. The ^ paratype and although similar marks are indicated in 

9 holotype, in this order. some individuals of some other species. 

Notes: Although the 3 individuals listed 

above vary somewhat, they agree in form Pogonoglossus unicolor (Macleay) 

of genae, wide-cordate prothorax, shining Macleay 1886, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South 
sparsely punctate surface, and moderate Wales (2) 1, p. 137 {Planetes). 

size. I think they probably represent a ^'"''"'^ ^^^'^^ Deutsche Ent. Zeitschrift for 1907, 
single, variable species. 

Description ( significant details only, from 

Pogonoglossus parvus n.sp. Macleay's description). Color brownish 

Description. With characters of genus; hlack, legs dark; head shining, pronotum 

form as in Figure 139; brownish black, head and elytra dull and densely minutely punc- 

with 2 narrow oblic^ue red marks posteriorly tate; prothorax a little wider than long, with 

(see following Notes), appendages dark titles narrowed to posterior angles which 

brown; moderately shining, reticulate micro- ^re "rather obtusely rectangular"; elytra 

sculpture indistinct on head, irregular or "with 8 or 9 almost invisible striae"; length 

transverse and light on pronotum and elytra, c. 10 mm. 

Head 0.85 and 0.85 width prothorax; genae Type. From Fly R. (probably Papua); 

angularly prominent behind eyes; much of should be in Macleay Mus., Sydney (not 

front virtually impunctate. Prothorax cor- seen). 

date; width/length 1.48 and 1.56; base apex Notes. Sloane (1907) adds nothing to 
1.21 and 1.23; sides broadly sinuate before Macleay's description of unicolor except 
obtuse or nearly right posterior angles; ^^'^^ the insect is a Pogonogjo.ssus. The 
margins rather narrow and not strongly re- ^^^Y lightly striate elytra distinguish it from 
flexed; disc moderately convex, finely ^H known New Guinean species of this 
punctate-pubescent ( pubescence rubbed off genus except glabricoUis Van Emden ( be- 
in part in holotype ) . Elytra: width elytra low), from which it differs in having the 
prothorax 1.34 and 1.35; outer-apical angles pionotum densely punctate and pubescent 
narrowly rounded, sutural angles acute or rather than smooth and virtually glabrous 
slightly blunted; striae well impressed, ir- '^■'^ i" glabricoUis. 

regular but scarcely punctulate; intervals „ ; ; , • //■ v, .- ■ 

r.r^r.,.^v. c. 1 1^ 1 4. 1 i. o 1 Pogonoglossus glabncollis Van Emden 

convex, sparsely punctulate-pubescent, 3rd ^ ^ » 

^^'ith special dorsal punctures not surely ^''" ^'"''™ ^•^•^"' ^^^""^^■•" E"^- ^^^^""'^ 9^' P- ^^■ 

distinguishable. Secofu/f/rj/ .sexjva/ c/i<3/rtcfers Description. With characters of genus; 

as for genus; c^ with 2 or 3 (unsymmetric), form as in Figure 140 (but somewhat vari- 

9 3 setae each side last ventral segment, able); irregular dark brown or brownish 

Measurements: length 7.0-9.0; width 2.5- black, head with 2 reddish marks posteri- 

3.2 mm (the 6 is the larger). orly, appendages brown; moderately shining, 

Types. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. elytra duller, reticulate microsculpture in- 

31,523) from vie. Hollandia, West N. G., distinct on head and pronotum, light and 

July-Sept. 1944 (Darlington); and 1 9 irregular on elytra. Head 0.85 and 0.83 

paratype, Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 width prothorax; genae rounded; front 

(Darlington). almost impunctate. Prothorax cordate, vari- 

Notes. The small size, angulate genae, able; width/length 1.39 and 1.60 {sic); 

and form and microsculpture distinguish base/apex 0.98 and 1.07; sides broadly sinu- 

this species. The red marks on the head ate before obtuse or c. right posterior 



228 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



angles; margins rather narrow l:)iit variable; 
anterior angles rounded or bluntly pointed; 
disc almost flat, scarcely punctulate. Elytra: 
width elytra/prothorax 1.35 and 1.37; outer- 
apical angles broadly rounded, sutural 
angles acute or blunted; striae faintly in- 
dicated or virtually obsolete; surface closely 
punctulate; up to 3 apparent dorsal punc- 
tures sometimes visible on position of 3rd 
intervals. Secondary sexual characters un- 
determined ( i unknown); 9 with 3 or 4 
(sometimes unsymmetric) setae each side 
last ventral segment. Measurements: length 
12.5-16.0; width 4.2-5.3 mm. 

Type. A 9 from N-E. N. G.; in Van 
Emden Coll., British Mus. (seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1 
9, Kokoda-Pitoki, 400 m. Mar. 23, 1956 
(Gressitt); 1 9, Fiume Purare, Jan. 1894 
(Loria, borrowed from Straneo). N-E. 
N. G.: the holotype; 1 9, Motae, Kuku 
Kuku, E. Highlands, 6000 ft. (c. 1830 m), 
"1/3/64" (R. Hornabrook). West N. G.: 1 
9 , Geelvink Bay, 1878 ( Raffray and Main- 
dron, Paris Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The 9 9 from 
Kokoda-Pitoki and Motae. 

Notes. Although the 4 individuals listed 
above vary in several characters ( e.g. form 
of prothorax, degree of obliteration of 
elytra! striae), the variations are not obvi- 
ously concordant, and I think only one very 
distinct species is involved. It is uniquely 
characterized by form, elytral striae faint or 
obsolete, and combination of virtually im- 
punctate jironotum and densely punctulate 
elytra. 

Tribe HELLUONINI 

Sloanc 191 I, I'loc. Liiiiican Soc. New Sontli Wales 

39, p. 568. 
Csiki 1932, Colcop. Cat., Carabidac, liarpalinac 7, 

p. 1572 (see for synonymy and additional rcfcr- 

fnccs). 
Jeanne! 1949, Colcop. Carahiciucs dc la Hejjion 

MaljJiaclie, Part 3, p. 1041. 
Jrdlicka 1963, Knt. Abliandlnn«en 2S, p. 167. 
llclliioiiinac Basilfwsky 1953, Exploration Pare 

National I'Upemba, Fasc. 10. p. 219. 



This is still another small but widely 
distributed tribe. The members of it are 
medium-sized or large carabids, usually of 
characteristic form, usually with sparse or 
short pubescence, and usually with mouth- 
parts including the labrum strikingly modi- 
fied. Three genera are confined to the 
Americas; 6, to Africa and/or the Oriental 
Region (except that a species of Crea^.ris 
extends to Australia); 13, to the Australian 
Region. (A supposed helluonine on Ne\v- 
Caledonia has been shown not to be one 
by Britton, 1937, Ent. Monthly Magazine 
73, p. 127. ) The Australian genera form a 
distinct group of the tribe, characterized by 
Sloane (1914, p. 570). Five genera (1 of 
them new) and 8 species of Australian- 
group Helluonini occur in New Guinea, 
where the only other member of the tribe 
is CreaiS,ris lahrosa, \\'hich ranges frotn 
Ceylon and India to Australia. 

In spite of Sloane's ( 1914 ) careful stud\ 
of the Australian genera, I have had trouble 
with the generic classification of the New 
Guinean forms. This is partK' because m\' 
material is inadequate: 2 obviously distinct 
new species are represented by unique fe- 
males which I have assigned to Ilelhionidius 
with some doubt, and I have been forced to 
base an apparent new genus on a single 
male. I myself found no Helluonini during 
11 months in New Guinea and I can sa\ 
nothing about their habitats or habits there 
except that all the New Guinean species 
are winged and that some of them fl\' to 
light. In Australia, different hc41uonines 
lixc on the ground and on tree trunks, usu- 
alK in open or openly-wooded places rather 
than in rain forest. 

K'i;v lo (Iknkha ok IIki.ia omm or Xi:w Cvinka 

1. Front iemora not anuniate-protnlicrant he- 
low: size smaller, lenutli r. 9 mm (p. 
229 ) _ - - Creofiris 

- Front femora tliickened and lilnntly angn- 
late or protnl)eranl hi'low near base; size 
larjier — - 2 

2. Prothorax inoderateK' narrowed posteriorly, 
witii si(.les moilerately siimate (p. 2'v3 ) _, 
IIcIIikkIciiki 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 



229 



- Piothoiax strongly narrowed posteriorly, with 
sides strongly sinuate and base subpeduncu- 
late 3 

3. Ligula subtriangular, narrowed anteriorly, 

with apex narrowly rounded ( p. 233 ) 

Helhiosoma 

- Ligula very wide, with apex broadly rounded 
or eniarginate 4 

4. Labrum with 2 principal setae; elytra with 
Sth intervals much wider tlian 7th and closely 
punctate; length ( in New Ciuinea ) c. 30 mm 

( p. 233 ) Gigadema 

- Lal)rum with 4 or more principal setae; elytra 
with 8th intervals not much wider than 7th 
and less closely punctate; length c. 20 mm 
or less 5 

5. Tarsal segments unusually widened or par- 
allel-sided, the 4th hind-tarsal segments eniar- 
ginate for more than V2 the segments' length; 
labrum usually with 4 principal setae (p. 
229 ) Helluoniduis 

- Tarsal segments not thus widened and not 
parallel-sided, the 4th hind-tarsal segments 
shallowly emarginate; laJMum with c. 10 
principal setae (see also Description) (p. 
232 ) HcUuopapud 

Genus CREAGRIS Nietner 

Nietncr 1857, J. Asiatic Soc. Bengal 26, p. 139. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1575 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. Creagris lahrosa Nietner, 
below. 

Generic distribution. Six species in the 
Oriental Region, 1 of them extending to 
New Guinea and Queensland, Australia; 
possibly an additional species in Queens- 
land. 

Notes. The listing of C. wiJsoni Castelnau 
(the supposed endemic Queensland species) 
also from Java by Csiki (p. 1576) is ap- 
parently a compiler's error based on a mis- 
reading of Sloane 1914 ( see reference under 
following species ) . 

Creagris labrosa Nietner 

Nietner 1857, J. Asiatic Soc. Bengal 26, p. 139. 
Sloane 1914, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

39, p. 570. 
1920, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 

45, p. 322. 



Csiki 1932, Coleop. Clat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1575 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description. None required here; note size 
small; color dark brown; labrum expanded, 
r. circular, shallowly channeled each side; 
mentum with lateral lobes and median 
tooth all produced as long very slender 
processes; front femora not angulate below; 
length c. 9 mm. 

Types. From Ceylon; in Berlin U. Zool. 
Mus. and Stettin Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 2, 
Mt. Lamington, 1300-1500 ft. (c. 400-460 
m) (C. T. McNamara, S. Australian Mus.). 

Notes. C. lahrosa is now known from 
Ceylon, India, Burma, etc., Java, New 
Guinea, and Queensland, Australia (a 
specimen from Mackay, recorded by 
Sloane, 1914). 

Genus HELLUONIDIUS Chaudoir 

Chaudoir 1872, Revue et Magasin Zool. (2) 23, 
p. 216. 

Sloane 1914, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
39, pp. 571, 582. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1580 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diagnosis. Form c. as in Figure 142; 
pubescent (as usual in tribe); genae vari- 
able; labrum variable, produced or angu- 
late at apex, usually with 4 principal setae; 
mentum toothed; ligula rounded; prothorax 
strongly constricted at base; elytra with Sth 
intervals not much wider than 7th, irregu- 
larly punctate; 4th hind-tarsal segments ± 
wide, deeply emarginate; see also preceding 
Key to Genera of UeUuonini of New Guinea. 

Description. None attempted here; ma- 
terial inadequate. 

Type species. Aenigma cyanipcnne Hope, 
of Australia. 

Generic distribution. Eastern and north- 
ern Australia, New Guinea. 

Notes. Of the 4 New Guinean species 
now placed in this genus, only chrysocomes 
Maindron is a typical Helluonidius. The 
other 3 species, 2 of them based on unique 



230 Bulletin Museum of Coniptudfive Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



females (sex determined by dissection), 
differ in form of labrum and differ among 
themselves in form of genae, form of tarsi, 
and in other ways. They are obviously 
distinct species, but males are needed to 
determine generic assignments. 

Key to Species of Helluonidius of 
New Guinea 

1. Lalnuni loiijier than wide, narrowly pro- 
duced at apex (p. 230) chrysocoitics 

- Labrum wider than long, not narrowly pro- 
duced at apex 2 

2. Labrum witli median setae close to margin; 
cKtra microreticulate (p. 230) laevifrons 

- I^abrum with median setae c. V:\ lalirum's 
length behind margin; elytra not micro- 
reticulate 3 

3. Genae abruptly truncate, c. straight from 
posterior edges of eyes to neck; tarsi \'er>' 
wide (Fig. 184) (p. 231) latipes 

- Genae moderately convex; tarsi less wide (p. 
231) politus 

Helluonidius chrysocomes Maindron 

Mainchon 1908, Ko\a (Guinea 5, Li\raisf)n 2, p. 
299. 

Description. None required here; form 
as in Figure 142; form of labrum ( longer 
than u'ide, and narrowK' produced at apex ) 
unique in tribe Ilelluonini in New Guinea; 
genae prominent; antenna and hind tarsus, 
Figure 182; color black or dark brown; sur- 
face without reticulate microsculpturc; 
lengtli c. 16.()-1(S.5 mm. 

Type. From "Sentani" (near llollandia ), 
West N. G.; probably in Paris Mus. (not 
seen ) . 

Occurrence in Neic Cuineo. Twenty-two 
speeimens from 11 localities scattered oxer 
most ol the length of New (Guinea, from 
I^)rt Moresby and the Fly R. to the N'ogel- 
kop; at low iiltitudes, none labeled higluM" 
than SOO ni ( Araucaria Camp). 

Notes. This is a t\'pical IJelluoniditis, 
very close to ;ind perhajis the same as one 
of the Australian species, which are all \'(m\' 
similar and which n(H>d revision. 

Most spec iiiK'iis ol elinjsocomes haxc the 
surface especially ol the elytra w ith a jiearly 
luster which is apparently due to a surface 
film of some sort, but fi individuals w ideU' 



scattered within the range of the species are 
shining black without luster. 

Helluonidius laevifrons n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 143; antenna and hind 
tarsus. Figure 183; black, appendages dark; 
head and pronotum shining (but punctate 
as described below), elytra duller, with c. 
isodiametric microsculpturc. Head 0.84 
width prothorax; genae oblique, not at all 
prominent; chpeus subtrimcate, 1 -setose 
each side; labrum wider than long, obtuseK' 
subangulate, sinuate each side of angula- 
tion, 4-setose with inner setae very close to 
anterior margin (see Notes, below); front 
deeply impressed each side, the impressions 
punctate but front otherwise broadh' im- 
punctate; neck moderately impressed and 
punctate; mentum with large triangular 
tooth; ligula wide, irregularly rounded, de- 
pressed at middle, with 3 pairs seta-bearing 
punctures one behind the other; inner lobe 
of maxillae with inner edge irregular near 
middle and with strong hook at c. right 
angles from inner-apical angle; palj^i rather 
short and thick. Protliora.x: width length 
1.19; base/apex 1.02; base head 0.72; mar- 
gins narrow, scarcely interrupted; disc ir- 
regularly convex, irregularly coarsely punc- 
tate with punctures tcmding to form longi- 
tudinal rows between n;urow smooth sp;ices 
at middle. Elyfrd: width ebtra prothorax 
1.22; striae well impressed, punctulate; in- 
tervals slight 1\ convex, most int(M\als 
slightly irrt\gularly 2-seriately punctate, 
si)ccial dorsal punctures of 3rd not sureK 
distinguish;ibl(\ 8th slightK' wider than 7th 
and irregularly (not 2-seriately ) punctukite. 
Lciis: tarsal segments more nearl\- j^arallel 
than usual (Fig. 183); 4th hind-tarsal seg- 
ments emarginate for slightK more* than ^-i 
length. Measurcnicnls: length 18.0; width 
6.5 mm. 

Type. Il()l()t\pe V (Bishop Mus.) Irom 
Torrieelli Mts.,'M()kai Village, N-E. N. G., 
750 m. j;ui. 1-23, 1959 (W. \\ . Brandt); 
the type is unique. 

Notes. The lionl maiuiii ol ihc ];i1)rum 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Dadingion 



231 



is slightly sinuate on each side, with the 
inner seta-bearing puncture near margin at 
the sinuation. This form of lahrum is inter- 
mediate between that of //. cJirysocomcs 
and those of the following two species. But 
in some other ways ( form of genae and 
especially form of tarsi ) the present species 
is strongly characterized, not intermediate. 

Helluonidius lafipes n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 144; antenna and hind 
tarsus. Figure 184; dark brown, appendages 
dark; shining, without reticulate microsculp- 
ture, but punctate as described below. 
Head 0.82 width prothorax; genae oblique, 
not at all prominent; clypeus subtruncate, 
2-setose each side; labrum wider than long, 
bluntly obtusely angulate, not sinuate at 
sides of angulation, 4-setose with inner setae 
almost % length of labrum behind anterior 
margin; front irregularly convex, deeply im- 
pressed each side anteriorly, punctate at 
sides and base but c. impunctate at middle; 
mentum with strong bluntly triangular 
tooth; ligula wide, rounded, scarcely im- 
pressed at middle, probably 6-setose as in 
laevifrons (above) but anterior setae 
covered or broken; inner lobe of maxillae c. 
as in laevifrom-, palpi stout. Frothorox: 
width length 1.40; base apex 1.01; base ' 
head 0.72; margins narrow, much inter- 
rupted anteriorly; disc irregularly convex, 
irregularly punctate. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.52; striae impressed, scarcely 
punctulate; intervals slightly convex, ir- 
regularly 2-seriately punctate, 3rd with 
special dorsal punctures not surely distin- 
guishable, 8th not wider than 7th, irregu- 
larly, rather sparsely in part 2-seriately 
punctate. Le^s: tarsi exceptionally wide 
(Fig. 184); 4th hind-tarsal segments much 
wider than long, deeply and widely emar- 
ginate; 5th segments wide and flattened. 
Measurements: length 19.8; width 6.8 mm. 

Type. Holotype 5 (Leiden Mus.) from 
Rattan Camp, West N. G., 1200 m, Feb.- 
Mar. 1939 (Toxopeus); the type is unique. 



Notes. This species is assigned to 
Helluonidius with doubt. The genae are 
formed as in the preceding species (laevi- 
frons) and the labrum is almost the same 
in shape, but the 2 inner setae of the 
labrum are much farther back and the tarsi 
are strikingly different. 

Helluonidius polifus n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figiue 145; antenna and hind 
tarsus. Figure 185; brownish black, append- 
ages dark; shining, without reticulate micro- 
sculpture but punctate as described below. 
Head 0.84 width prothorax; genae moder- 
ately convex, subprominent; clypeus broadly 
slightly emarginate, 2-setose each side; 
labrum wider than long, bluntly angulate, 
with apparently 2 principal setae on right 
and 4 on left, the inner seta on each side 
almost V:'. length of labrum behind anterior 
margin; front weakly convex, deeply im- 
pressed each side anteriorly, punctate at 
sides and across base and with a few widely 
scattered punctures near middle; mentum 
with strong blunt tooth; ligula wide, 
rounded, scarcely impressed, 6-setose as in 
laevifrons: inner lobe of maxillae c. as in 
laevifrons and latipes, with hook from inner- 
apical angle; palpi less thick than in pre- 
ceding species. Prothorax: width length 
1.33; base/apex 0.97; liase/head 0.68; mar- 
gins narrow, much interrupted anteriorly; 
disc weakly irregularly convex, irregularly 
coarsely punctate. Elytra: width elytra/ 
prothorax 1.44; striae impressed, punctulate; 
intervals convex, irregularly 2-seriately 
punctate, 3rd with special dorsal punc- 
tures not surely identifiable, 8th not much 
wider than 7th, irregularly in part 2-seri- 
ately sparsely punctate. Legs: tarsi mod- 
erately wide and flattened, but less so than 
in preceding species (latipes); 4th hind- 
tarsal segments wide, very deeply emargi- 
nate. Measurements: length 16.7; width 
5.3 mm. 

Type. Holotype $ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,524), from Maba Vy., Menyama, Mo- 



232 



BuUetiu Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



robe Dist., N-E. N. G. (L. Hastings); 1 i 
paratype (Bishop Mus.), Oriomo River, 6 
m, Feb. 13, 1964 ("H.C."), light trap; 1 
9 paratype (M.C.Z.), Maprik, N-E. N. (;.. 
Oct. 14, 1957 (Gressitt), hght trap. 

Notes. This species is simihir to the pre- 
ceding {hiti])cs) l)ut has more prominent 
genae and narrower tarsi. The genae are 
less prominent than in dinjsocomes but lead 
toward that species, while the labrum sug- 
gests a relationship \\ ith Jatipcs. 

HELLUOPAPUA n. gen. 

Dia^no.sis. Form of lleUuonidius; labrum 
wide, multisetose; ligula wide, slightly 
emarginate, setose as in llcUuonid\ns\ inner 
lobe maxillae strongly hooked on inner side 
before apex; Sth elytral intervals e. wide as 
7th, 2-seriately punctate with few or no 
scattered punctures; tarsi slender, 4th hind- 
tarsal segments shallowly emarginate; front 
femora obtusely pronu'nent below near base; 
i front tarsi without squamae; i copula- 
tory organs as in Figure LSI. 

De.seription. See description of only 
known species, below. 

Ti/})e speeies: H. toxopei, below. 

Gencrie distri])ution. Known from a 
shigle locality in West N. (i. 

Notes. This new genus differs from Ilel- 
hionidiiis in labrum multisetose; hook of 
inner lobe of the maxillae subapieal (not 
apical), and tarsi much more slend(>r with 
4th hind-tarsal segments shallowly (not 
deeply) emarginate. It differs from Cwi,^/- 
dema in labrum multisetose and (Sth el\ tial 
intervals much narrow(M- and 2-seriatel\ 
(not densely) ptinctatc. It fits no other 
genus in Sloane's (1914, pp. 571-572) key. 
And it differs from all previously known 
Ilelluonini of Sloane's ( 1914, p. 570) "Aus- 
tralian (irouj) in lacking sexual s((namae 
on i front tarsi. 

Helluopapua toxopei n. sp. 

Deseiij)li()iL With characters of genus; 
form as in I'igure 146; slend(>r, subparallel. 
depressed; antennae and hind tarsus, Figure 



186; black, appendages dark brown, 2 
minute red spots on head posteriorly; sur- 
face sparsely pubescent, moderately shining, 
microsculpture faint and irregular on head 
and pronotum, more distinct and e. isodia- 
metric on elytra, and surface punctate as 
described below. Head 0.90 width pro- 
thorax; genae rounded, moderately promi- 
nent; clypeus slightly sinuate-truncate, with 
several setae each side; labrum wider than 
long, wide in front, broadly sinuate each 
side in front with apex obtusely angulate, 
with several principal setae each side but 
n(jne near middle; front irregularly convex, 
deeply impressed each side and transversely 
impressed anteriorly (individual character?), 
irregularly punctate at sides and posteriorly; 
mentum with strong triangular tooth and 
side lobes long and pointed; ligula as de- 
scribed for genus; palpi rather slender. 
ProtJiorax: width length 1.38; base apex 
0.78; base head 0.69; margins narrow, not 
interrupted; disc weakly irregularly convex, 
surface irregularly pvmctate. Elytra: width 
elytra prothorax 1.52; striae impressed, not 
punctulate; intervals slightK' comex. rather 
sparsely 2-seriately punctate. Measure- 
ments: length 22.5; w idth 6.7 mm. 

Type, llolotype S (sex determined by 
dissection) (Leiden Mus.) from Rattan 
Camp, West N. G., 1200 m, Feb.-Mar. 
1939 (Toxopeus); the t\'pe is uniciue. 

Notes. Although this ,j is from the same 
localit)' as the 9 type of lleUuo)\idius 
Idlipes. the two specimens differ in so man\' 
ways that the\' cannot be one spt>cii\s but 
ha\(' to be assigned to different genera: 
the two specimens differ in lonn. in genae. 
in sha])e and setae ol labrum, in position 
of hook of inner lobe of maxillae, and in 
form of tarsi, and this is just a beginning of 
the list of differences. A r(>\ision ol all Ntn\ 
(iuinean and Australian members of the 
tribe, with mucli additional material, will 
l^robabK' be nec-essary to decide the real 
relationships of this new genus as well as of 
the new species ol I lelluonidiits described 
above. 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 233 



Genus HELLUOSOMA Castelnau 

Castelnau liSttT, Notes on Australian Coleop., p. 
20. 

Sloane 1914, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
39, pp. 571, 585. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1581 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diopiosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. H. atrum Castelnau (be- 
low ) . 

Generic distribution. Tropical Australia 
and New Guinea. 

Notes. Only one species of this genus is 
adequately known, although a second 
species may exist in Australia ( Sloane 1914, 
p. 586). 

Helluosoma afrum Castelnau 

Castelnau 1867, Notes on Australian Coleop., p. 21. 

Sloane 1914, Proe. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
39, p. 586. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caraliidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1581 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description. None required here; note 
form c. as in Helluoniditis; color black or 
dark brown; genae prominent; labrum 
wider than long, obtusely angulate, 4-setose; 
ligula narrower than usual in tribe, nar- 
rowed anteriorly, narrowly rounded at apex; 
length c. 12.5-15.0 mm. 

Type. From Rockhampton, Queensland, 
Australia; present location unknown (not 
found at Melbourne in 1958). 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 3, 
Rouku, Morehead R., Apr. 1962 {\\\ W. 
Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.); 7, Port Moresby and 
vicinity, various dates and collectors ( Dept. 
Agr. Port Moresby; A.M.N.H.); 1, Bisia- 
numu, Sogeri Subdistrict, c. 1600 ft. (485 
m). Mar. 1955 (J. J. H. Szent-Ivany and J. 
McAdam, Dept. Agr. Port Moresby). 

Notes. The relatively narrow ligula is 
diagnostic of this species in this tribe in 
New Guinea. I find no significant dif- 
ferences between specimens from Australia 
and from New Guinea, although individual 
variation occurs in both places. 



Genus HELLUODEMA Castelnau 

Castelnau 1867, Notes on Australian Coleop., p. 19. 

Sloane 1914, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
39, pp. .571, 586. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1581 (see for .synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diapiosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. HeUuomorpha hatesi Thom- 
son {= tinicolor Hope), of Australia (see 
below ) . 

Generic distribution. Eastern and north- 
ern Australia, New Guinea. 

Notes. Two species of this genus occur 
in Australia, one of them extending to New 
Guinea. 

Helluodema un/co/or (Hope) 

Hope 1842, Proc. Ent. Soc. London for 1842, p. 47 
( Aeni<itna). 

Sloane 1914, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
39, p. 587. 

Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caral)idae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1581 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Description. None required here; note 
fonn (Fig. 141) slender; genae prominently 
rounded; prothorax only moderately (not 
strongly) constricted before base; labrum 
wider than long, obtusely angulate, 4-setose; 
ligula broadly rounded, obtusely emargi- 
nate at apex; length c. 13-15 mm. 

Type. From Australia; present location 
unknown. 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 3, 
Rouku, Morehead R., Apr. 1962 {W. W. 
Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). West N. G.: 2, 
Merauke, sea level. Mar. 24, 28, 1955 ( L. D. 
Brongersma, Leiden Mus.), evidently taken 
in light trap. 

Notes. This species occurs in eastern 
Australia at least from northern New South 
Wales to Cooktown. The New Guinean 
specimens agree well with Australian ones. 

Genus GIGADEMA Thomson 

Thomson 1859, Arcana Naturae, p. 93. 
Sloane 1914, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
39, pp. 572, 593. 



234 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology. Vol. 137, No. 1 



Csiki 1932, Coleop. Cat., Caiabidae, Harpalinae 7, 
p. 1582 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Diapwsis. See preceding Kcij to Genera. 

Deseription. None required here. 

Type .species. G. titanum Thomson ( = 
nocte Newman), of Australia. 

Generic distribution. Australia; south- 
ern New Guinea. 

Notes. This is the principal genus of the 
tribe in Australia. One of the 12 or more 
Australian species is now recorded from a 
single locality in southern New Guinea, 
almost opposite the tip of the Cape York 
Peninsula. 

Gigadema maxiilare Sloane 

Sloane 1914, Proc. Linnean Soc. New South Wales 
39, pp. 595, 599. 

Description. None required here; note 
large size; prothorax constricted at base; 
color dark; surface short-pubescent; labrum 
c. long as wide, rounded, 2-setose; length 
of Australian specimens 27-35, of New 
Guinean specimen 32 mm. 

Types. From tropical Queensland, Aus- 
tralia: Townsville, Kuranda, Cooktown, 
Princess Charlotte Bay. I here designate 
as lectotype a specimen labeled "Cktn., Q., 
Olive, i " and "Giiiadcmo nuixillare SI., Id. 
by T. G. Sloane"; in Sloane Coll., C.S.I.R.O., 
Canberra ( seen ) . 

Occurrence in New Guinea. Papua: 1 
9 , Rouku, Morehead R., Apr. 1962 (W. W. 
Brandt, C.S.I.R.O.). 

Notes. The Papuan 9 agrees with Aus- 
tralian examples of maxillare in nonsexual 
characters, but a ^ is needed to confirm 
the identification. Another specimen ap- 
parently of nuixillare, but also a 9 , is 
before me from Mona Is., Torres Straits 
(J. VV. Schomberg, S. Australian Mus.). 

Tribe BRACHININI 

Brachijitiiii CIsiki 1932, (Coleop. Cat., (;aral)ida(\ 
Harpalinae 7, p. 1593 (sec for synonymy and 
additional references ) . 

Jedlicka 1963, Ent. .AbhanilliniHcn 28, p. 524. 

Bnichinidac Jearniel 1942, Faime de France, 
Coleop. Carabiques, I'art 2. p. 1102. 



1949, Coleop. Carabiques de la Region 

Malgache, Part 3, p. 1079. 
BrachUdnac Basilewsky 1953, Exploration Pare 

National I'Upemba, Fasc. 10, Carabidae, p. 235. 
Habu 1967, Fauna Japonica, Carabidae, Trun- 

catipennes Group, p. 280. 

The beetles of this tribe are bombardiers 
(but are not the only Carabidae that "shoot" 
repellents) and are well known to most 
entomologists in most parts of the world. 
Their form is characteristic, and identifica- 
tion is confirmed by presence of S visible 
ventral abdominal segments. 

Two genera of the tribe are very widely 
distributed, and these are the only genera 
that reach New Guinea. Fhcropsophus, 
which occurs (discontinuously ) in all prin- 
cipal tropical regions, has 6 New Guinean 
species of which 5 are endemic and 1 shared 
with Australia. Brachinus, which is almost 
worldwide except that it does not reach 
Australia, has 1 New Guinean species which 
is endemic but which is the easternmost 
member of an Oriental species group. 

Key to Geneh.a of Br.\chixixi of New Guixe.\ 
1. Elytra with costae strong, distinct, and 

separate to apex (p. 234) PJwropsopiuts 
- Elytra with costae weaker and ])econnng 
faint and in part vaguely connected before 
ape-x (p. 239) Brarhiitus 

Genus PHEROPSOPHUS Soiier 

Solicr 1833, Ann. Soc. Ent. France 2, p. 161. 
Csiki 19.32, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 7, 

p. 1595 (see for subgenera and ad(h'tional rcler- 

ences ). 
l\ira})hcropn(>]>h\is lliilxMitiuil 1911, Diiitsche \\\\[. 

Zeitschritt for 1914. pp. 140. 442 (new s>-n()n- 

yniy). 
Csiki 1933, Coleop. Cat.. Carabidai'. Harpalinae 8, 

p. 1604 (as subgenus of /'/icro/wo/^/n/.s). 

Dia^^nosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here; see 
Figures 147-151. 

7'(//)<" species. Ol Pli(ropso))hu.s. Brachi- 
nus senciialensis Dejean, oi Africa. Of 
Paraplieropsoplius, P. intermedins Huben- 
tlial {— verticalis Dejean) b\ present des- 
ignation. 

Generic distribution. All principal trop- 
ical and s()m(- wann-teinperate regions of 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 235 



the world. In the Asia tic- Aiistrahan area 
species are numerous in southeastern Asia 
and the western Malay Archipelago, fewer 
eastward, and only I variable species 
reaches Australia. 

Notes. The supposed "subgenus" Para- 
pheropsophus was based on trivial char- 
acters, primarily on the shape of the dark 
mark between the eyes ( which is varialile ) 
supported by a supposedly characteristic 
habitus which, according to Hubenthal, is 
'ieichter zu erkennenden als zu beschrei- 
benden." In my opinion all the 4 "species" 
and 5 additional "varieties" listed in this 
subgenus by Csiki (following Hubenthal) 
are forms of a single species {verticals 
Dejean) which is not worth subgeneric 
separation from PJieropsophus. 

The 6 species of Fheropsophus that occur 
in New Guinea are ecologically differenti- 
ated. P. verficalis is very common in a 
variety of wet places and is winged. P. 
amnicola has been found only on the banks 
of large rivers (Markham and Sepik) and 
is always winged. The other 4 species are 
rare, local, flightless forms; 1 (cafiilus) is 
known to occur in leaf-litter on the ground 
in rain forest, and this is probably the habi- 
tat of the others too. 

Besides the 6 species of Phcropsophus 
treated below, I have seen a single speci- 
men of javanus Dejean (agnatus Chaudoir) 
labeled as from New Guinea ("New Guinea, 
Mimika R., A. F. R. Wollaston. 1911-229." 
(British Mus.)). This conspicuous species 
is common in the western Malay Archipel- 
ago but has not been found in New Guinea 
by recent collectors and has apparently not 
been found in the Moluccas. I think the 
specimen in question is probably wrongly 
labeled. New Guinea should be deleted 
from the range of the species as given by 
Csiki (p. 1601) and others. 

Key to Species of Fheropsophus of New Guinea 

1. Elytra each with 8 costae c. equally promi- 
nent 2 

- Elytra with odd costae more prominent than 
even ones at least at base ,5 

2. Strictly bicolored: head and prothorax yellow 



or reddish yellow without dark marks, elytra 
dark without pale marks (p. 235) _ amnicola 

- Not thus bicolored: all or part of pronotum 
and part of head dark, elytra dark with or 
without pale marks 3 

3. Front yellow with isolated usually V-shaped 
dark mark between eyes; inner wings large 
and folded (p. 236) verticalis 

- Posterior half or more of head dark; inner 
wings vestigial 4 

4. Head bicolored, yellow anteriorly, dark pos- 
teriorly; prothorax wider than long at middle 
(by measurement); femora not or only 
minutely black-tipped; length 8.5-12.5 mm 
(p. 237) aptim^iuorpJuis 

- Head dark with small V-shaped reddish mark 
on front; prothorax as long ( at middle ) as 
wide and appearing longer; femora con- 
spicuously black-tipped; length c. 18 mm (p. 
237) pedes 

5. Pronotum (sparsely) pimctate, much rough- 
ened at base and apex; length c. 15-16 mm 
(p. 238) catuht.s 

- Pronotum \irtually impmictate, scarcely 
roughened; length 20.5 mm (p. 238) __ cants 

Fheropsophus amnicola n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form (Fig. 147) c. as of verticalis; head 
and pronotum yellow without dark marks, 
elytra black without pale marks, append- 
ages yellow. Head 0.92 and 0.93 width 
prothorax. Prothorax subcordate; width/ 
length 1.14 and 1.13; base/apex 0.94 and 
1.01; sides broadly arcuate anteriorly, 
broadly sinuate before c. right posterior 
angles; margins very narrow; disc convex, 
irregularly subpunctate and punctulate. 
Elytra moderately narrowed anteriorly; 
width elytra/ prothorax 1.64 and 1.66; each 
elytron with 8 well defined costae (in- 
cluding raised suture), the costae equally 
elevated and equally prominent at base; 
surface of costae finely microreticulate, in- 
tercostal intervals longitudinally roughened. 
Inner icings full. Measurements: length c. 
8.5-15.0; width 3.2-5.3 mm. 

Types. Holotype c^ (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,525) and 34 paratvpes from vie. Nadzab, 
N-E. N. G., July 1944 (Darhngton); and 
1 paratype. Main R., Sepik, N-E. N. G., 
Feb. 1965 (R. Hornabrook). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Nadzab. 



236 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoolop^y, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Notes. The preceding description con- 
tains all the characters that now seem worth 
specifying for this new species, which is 
distinguished from ceiiicaJis primarily by 
color. (Jolor, pioperly understood and with 
allowance for variation, is in fact specific 
in this genus. The geographic and ecologic 
restriction of amtiicola. as compared with 
verticalis\ is another indication that the two 
species are fully distinct. My specimens 
were all taken on thi' banks of the Markham 
R., and none was found in anv other situa- 
tion. 

Pheropsophus verticalis Dejean 

Dfjfan 1825, Spitit-s (ieneral Coleop. 1, p. 302. 
Csiki 19.33, Coleop. Cat., Caral)idae, Harpalinae 

8, p. 1604 (see for Australian "varieties" and 

additional references ) . 
atistrali.s Castelnau 1867, Notes on Australian 

Coleop., p. 23 (new synonymy). 
papucmis Maeleay 1876, Proc. Linnean Soc. New 

South Wales 1, p. 166 (new synonymy). 
Heller 1910, AbhandhuiKen und Berichte Zool. 

VIus. Dresden 13, No. 3, p. 7. 
luaclcayi Sloane 1894, Proe. Linnean Soe. New 

Soutli Wales (2) 9, p. 4.53 (new synonymy). 
haliothonix Heller 1910, Abhandlunuen und 

Berichte Zool. Mus. Dresden 13, No. 3, p. 6 
( new synonymy ) . 
intermt'dius Iluhentiial 1914, Deutsclit' Ent. 

Zeitschrift for 1914, p. 440 (new synonymy). 

Deseription. None required here. This is 
the only New Ciuinean Plwropsophiis with 
an isolated black (or brown) frontal spot. 
See also under genus (above) and Notes 
(below); length 8.5-16.5 mm. 

Types. Of verticalis Dejean, from 
"Nouvelle Tlollande" (= Australia ); in 
Oberthiir Coll., Paris Mus. Of (tiislralis 
Castelnau, from Hockhampton, Queensland, 
Australia; present location unknown. Of 
ixipnemis Maeleay, from Katow , Papua; 
presumably in Maeleay Mus., Sydney. Of 
nuirlediji Sloane, from King's Sound, NW. 
Australia; lectotype not designated. Of 
haliolliorax Heller, from l''iiischhafen, N-K. 
N. (i.; in Dresden Mus. Of intermedins 
Ilubenthal, from Neu Itrilain; in Hcrlin 
Zool. Mus. (Of all these types, I have seen 
only some cotxpes of niaeleai/i. ) 

Occurrence in New Cui)\ea. Coinmou 



throughout New Guinea: 215 specimens; 
most from low altitudes, only 2 individuals 
from above 1000 m; common at Dobodura. 

Notes. The synonymy proposed abo\'e is 
based not on comparison of types but on 
examination of much material from many 
localities in Australia as well as New 
Ckiinea, New Britain, and some other islands. 
As a result of it I have concluded that, in 
the area in question, all the Fhcropsophus 
with an isolated dark frontal spot belong 
to one variable species, verticalis Dejean, 
which ranges over the whole of Australia 
and New Guinea and extends to New 
Britain, New Ireland, the Solomons, and 
perhaps other islands. 

In reaching this conclusion, I first con- 
sidered the supposed separate northern 
Australian species, maclcayi Sloane. Of it, 
Sloane had only 3 specimens, which hap- 
pened to be rather small ( 11.5-13 mm) and 
to share some minor peculiarities of form 
and markings including presence of yellow 
shoulder spots and elytral fasciae of con- 
stant shape. My material from subtropical 
and tropical northern Australia shows that 
these characters are in fact indixidual rather 
than si)ecific. For example, 6 specimens 
from the Blackall Range, in subtropical 
South Queensland, \ary in size from 11.5 
to 14.5 mm ( to apex of {>K'tra ) and vary 
also considerabl) in lorm and somewhat in 
markings, although none has shoulder 
spots; and 4 specimens from mid-j:)eninsular 
C>ape York (Co(mi and Silver Plains) are 
large (e. 14.5-16.5 mm) and \ary in exact 
form of prothorax, in prominence of humeri, 
and in markings: e.g., 2 have and 2 have 
not Ncllow shoulder spots. 

The New Guinean individuals that I in- 
clude in verticalis vary in details of form, 
especially in prominiMu-e of humeri. 4'he\- 
\ary in si/.r Irom e. S.5 to 16.5 mm. And 
tlu'v N'ary in markings: the trans\(M-se usu- 
all\ \'-shaiied dark mark between the eyes 
is relatixcK constant but is soiiictimes 
slighth extentled posteriori) ; the pronotum 
\aries Irom wholly dark to broadl\- reddish 
Ncllow with ()nl\- the margins dark (inter- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 237 



mediates are common ) ; and the elytra vary 
from \\'holly dark to conspicuously marked, 
with median fascia often present but vari- 
able (but rarely large), shoulder spots 
sometimes present (distinct in only 2 in- 
dividuals, from S. Highlands and Popon- 
detta, and vestigial in a few other individ- 
uals), and apices sometimes with (variable) 
yellow margins. Although much of this 
variation is surely individual, some of it is 
or may be geographic. For example. New 
Guinean specimens usually have the elytra 
less heavily spotted than Australian speci- 
mens, although extremes overlap. But I 
think nothing is to be gained by recognizing 
subspecies now. The variations of this 
species should first be analyzed statistically, 
in detail, using series of specimens from 
exact localities, not just the New Guinean 
against Australian specimens. This will be 
third stage taxonomy (see Part I of my 
■'Garabid Beetles of New Guinea," p. 329), 
far beyond what I can attempt now. 

The wings of vcrticalis are fully de- 
veloped, or at least large enough to be 
strongly folded at apex, in all my Australian 
specimens and all New Guinean specimens 
that I now assign to this species. However, 
occasional short-winged individuals occur 
that may prove to be mutants of veiticalis 
although I am tentatively treating them as 
a separate species, ciptinomorphtis Heller 
( below ) . 

P. vcrticalis is common in a variety of 
wet places. Although all individuals are 
winged, they may not often fly and are 
not often taken in light traps. Observations 
on their flight would be interesting. 

The great variation in size of adults sug- 
gests that the larvae may be parasitoid, per- 
haps feeding on pupae of other beetles, as 
some other members of the tribe are known 
to do. 

Pheropsophus apfinomorphus Heller 

baliothorax var. apfiiH>iuori)}ui.s Heller 1910, 
Abhandlun^en unci Berichte Zool. Mus. Dresden 
13, No. 3, p. 7. 

Description. Form as in Figure 148; 



similar to vcrticalis (above) but elytra 
more narrowed to base; head bicolored, 
yellow anteriorly, dark posteriorly; elytra 
not marked (in the few specimens seen); 
inner wings vestigial, reduced to thin strips 
less than Vj long as elytra; length (to apex 
of elytra) c. 8.5-12.5 mm. 

Type. From New Guinea, exact locality 
not given, but altitude stated as 120 m; in 
Dresden Mus. (not seen). 

Occurrence in Netc Gtiinca. N-E. N. G.: 
1, Aitape, Aug. 1944 (Darlington). West 
N. G.: 1, Waris, S. of Hollandia, 450-500 
m, Aug. 16-23, 1959 (T. G. Maa, Bishop 
Mus.); 1, Maffin Bay, Aug. 1944 (Darling- 
ton); 1, same locality, June 15, 1944 (E. S. 
Ross, Galifornia Acad. ) . 

Notes. Heller does not say whether the 
type is winged, but the 4 specimens listed 
above answer his description in color of 
head (which is diagnostic), and their form, 
with narrowed humeri, does recall A))tinus. 

If it were not for the different head 
marking, I would consider my specimens of 
aptinomorphus to be short- winged mutants 
of vcrticalis. The distribution of the short- 
winged indi\iduals, widely scattered and 
occurring with vcrticalis (which I have 
from Waris and Maffin Bay and which 
probably occurs at Aitape too), would be 
consistent with their being mutants. But 
if they are mutants, then the mutant gene 
apparently must modify color of head as 
well as length of wings and form of elytra, 
and I do not dare assume that this is the 
case without further evidence. 

Pheropsophus pedes n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 149, with relatively long 
narrow prothorax and elytra ample but 
strongly narrowed to base; black, head with 
irregular red marks including U-shaped 
mark between eyes, appendages reddish, 
femora broadly tipped with black. Head 
0.96 width prothorax; eyes normal; 1st 
antennal segments swollen; labrum semi- 
circular; front 2-impressed anteriorly, with 
surface finelv c. isodiametricallv reticulate. 



238 



BuUciin Museum of Comparotivc Zoolomj, Vol. 137, No. 1 



Profhomx long; width/length 1.01; base ' 
apex 1.06; margins narrow, each with 1 
principal seta behind middle of length; disc 
moderately conxex, ^^'ith scattered punc- 
tures (the punctures with setae as usual in 
genus), strongly roughened at base, less so 
apically, and with disc finely irregularly 
microreticulate. Elytra: width elytra/pro- 
thorax 1.95; each elytron with 8 costae (in- 
cluding raised suture) c. equalh' dexeloped; 
siuface of costae finely irregularh' micro- 
reticulate, intercostal intervals longitu- 
dinally roughened. Inner aings evidently 
atrophied. Measurements: length LS; width 
6.5 mm. 

Ti/pe. Ilolotype 9 (Bishop Mus.) from 
Bomberi, Vogelkop, West N. G., 700-900 
m, June 7, 1959 (T. C. Maa); the type is 
imique. 

Notes. I do not know the relationships 
of this obviously distinct species. Char- 
acters distinguishing it from other New 
Ouinean Plier(>})so})1ius are given in th(> pre- 
ceding Key tu Speeies. 

Pheropsophus cafulus n. sp. 

Deseription. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 150, with elytra strongly 
narrowed to base; brownish black, head 
variably red-marked anteriorly, appendages 
reddish'. Head 0.91 and 0.90 width pro- 
thorax; eyes moderate; 1st antennal seg- 
ments slightly swollen; labrmn transverse, 
slightly prominent at middle; front 2-im- 
pressed anteriorly, with surface finely ir- 
regularly microreticulate, roughened jios- 
teriorh. Prothorax (juadrate-subcordate; 
width length l.OI and 1.07; ba.se/apex 1.11 
and 1.13; sides weakly arcuate anteriorly, 
broadly sinuate before basal angles; latter 
acute except bhmted, slightK produced 
posteriorly; margins moderate, each with 
one principal seta behind middle of k'ugth; 
disc irregularly convex, irregularh rough- 
ened especially posteriorly and anteriorly, 
and surface also with scatteri'd punctures 
(with hairs as usual) and irregularly faintly 
microreticulate. Elytra: width elytra pro- 
thorax 1.72 and 1.74; each cKtron with S 



costae (including raised suture), even 
costae stronger than odd ones and reaching 
base; surface of costae faintly finely micro- 
reticulate, intercostal intervals finely longi- 
tudinally roughened, and alternate intervals 
each with row of widely spaced setae. 
Inner wings reduced to vestiges that hardly 
extend beyond edge of metathorax. Mea- 
surements: length e. 15-16; width 5.0-5.6 
mm. 

Types. Holotype i (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,526) and 2 9 9 paratypes all from 
Dobodura, Papua, Mar.-July 1944 (Dar- 
lington ) . 

Measured specimens. The i holotype and 
1 9 paratype. 

Notes. I do not know the relationships of 
this very distinct species, which is quite 
different from any of the preceding ones 
although closely related to the following 
(canis). The beetles were taken among 
dead leaves on the ground in rain forest. 

Pheropsophus canis n. sp. 

Description. With characters of genus; 
form as in Figure 151, with elytra strongly 
narrowed to base; brownish black, head red 
anteriorly dark posteriori)-, pronotum with 
faint reddish marks, legs reddish yellow, 
antennae brown. Head 0.S7 width pro- 
thorax; eyes moderate; 1st antennal seg- 
ments slightly swollen; labrum transverse, 
with margin broadh' rounded; front weakh' 
2-impressed, closely irregularly microreticu- 
late, roughened posteriorly. Prothorax nar- 
rowK' subcordale; width length 1.07; base ' 
apex 1.06; sides broadU' arcuate anteriorh, 
broadly sinuate before slightly obtuse, 
slightly blunted, posterior angles; latter not 
produced posteriorly; margins moderate, 
each with 1 principal s(>ta behind middle; 
disc moderately conxcx. weakh roughened 
posteriorly but otherwise uearK' smooth, 
surlace w ith Wwc irregular reticulate" micro- 
sculpture. Elytra: width eKtra i^rothorax 
l.(S(); each eKtron with 5 conspicuous costae 
(nos. 1, 3, 5, 7, (S), the intermediate costae 
(nos. 2, 4, 6) weak or obsolete; surface^ of 
costae lineK' irreirularK microreticulate. iu- 



The Carabid Beetles of New Guinea • Darlington 239 



tercostal intervals finely roughened; even 
intervals probably with widely spaced setae, 
but latter in part broken oft or missing. 
Inner wings evidently vestigial. Measure- 
ments: length c. 20.5; width 7.6 mm. 

Type. Holotype 9 (Hawaiian Sugar 
Planters Association) from Koitaki, Papua, 
1500 ft. (c. 460 m), Nov.-Dec. 192(S ( Pem- 
berton Coll.); the type is unique. 

Notes. This flightless species is probably 
a geographic representative of the pre- 
ceding (eatuhis) but is larger, slightly dif- 
ferent in proportions, with antennae darker, 
pronotum much less roughened, and even 
intervals of elytra much more reduced. 
Other, related forms of this flightless group 
are to be expected elsewhere in New 
Guinea. 

Genus BRACHINUS Weber 

Weljer 1801, Observationes Entomologicae, p. 22. 
Bidclujnus Auct. including Csiki 1933, Coleop. 

Cat., Carabidae, Haipaliiuu' (S, p. 1606 (see for 

additional references ) . 

Diagnosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Tyi)e species. Carahus crepitans Lin- 
naeus, of Europe. 

Generic distribution. Most of the world, 
except Australia. In the Indo-Australian 
area, many diverse species occur in India, 
etc.; fewer, in the western part of the Malay 
Archipelago; and a single species occurs 
in New Guinea. 

Brachinus papua n. sp. 

Description. Form as in Figure 152; dark 
brown or brownish black, head red anteri- 
orly or with 2 red spots between eyes, 
pronotum sometimes vaguely reddish, ap- 
pendages reddish with tibiae, tarsi, and 
apices of femora darker brown; dull, entire 
upper surface with fine, c. isodiametric but 
irregular reticulate microsculpture, and 
much of upper surface with inconspicuous 
fine pubescence, often in part rubbed away, 
and perhaps missing on front, part of pro- 
thoracic disc, and disc of elytra. Head 1.01 
and 0.99 width prothorax; eyes moderate, 



genae oblique, setose; front longitudinally 
impressed each side, nearly smooth or 
slightly roughened and punctulate ( vari- 
able), with head more roughened posteri- 
orly. Prothorax subcordate (exact form 
variable); width/length 1.07 and 1.07; base/ 
apex 1.03 and 1.01; margins moderate, each 
with apparently 1 principal seta near middle 
of length; disc weakly convex, slightly finely 
transversely wrinkled, irregularly punctu- 
late, slightly longitudinally roughened at 
base and apex. Elytra ample; width elytra/ 
prothorax 2.34 and 2.33; intervals slightly 
raised but not costate. Inner icings full. 
Measurements: length 17.5-19.0; width 
7.3-8.0 mm. 

Types. Holotype c5 (M.C.Z., Type No. 
31,527) from Hollandia, West N. G., 250 
ft.. May 1945 (H. Hoogstraal); 1 paratype, 
same locality, Apr. 1945 (B. Malkin, 
U.S.N.M.); 2 paratypes, Tanahmerah, Res. 
Boven Digoel, West N. G., Feb. 1958 
( R. T. Simon Thomas ) ; and 1 paratype, 
Fenichel (Hungarian National Mus.). 

Measured specimens. The S holotype and 
1 9 paratype from Tanahmerah. 

Notes. This, the first known New 
Guinean Brachinus, may represent higut- 
ticeps Chaudoir of Java, etc., but papua is 
larger than my specimens of bigutticeps, 
with less sharply bicolored legs and less 
roughened pronotum. Further study is 
needed to clarify the relationships of these 
and related species in the Malay Archipel- 
ago. 

Tribe PSEUDOMORPHINI 

Csiki 1933, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 8, 
p. 1634 (see for synonymy and additional refer- 
ences ) . 

Pseiidomorphidae Auct. including Notman 1925, 
Proc. United States National Mus. 67, Art. 14, 
p. 1. 

Pseudomorphini (Figs. 153-159) do not 
look like Carabidae but superficially re- 
semble dytiscids or scolytids or Crypto- 
cep]}alus-\ike chrysomelids. They are nu- 
merous onlv in Australia; a few small 
species occur in New Guinea; a species of 



240 Bulletin Museum of Comparative Zoology, Vol. 137, No. 1 



the Australian and New Guinean genus 
Adelotopus has lieen found m Java; one 
genus, Cnjptocephalomorpha, ranges from 
New Guinea aeross the Malay Archipelago 
to the SE. corner of Asia; and a supposed 
endemic genus is localized on New Cale- 
donia. Outside this area the tribe contains 
only a single genus, Fseudomorpha, con- 
fined to the Americas and ranging from 
-southern United States to Brazil and 
Argentina/ 

Although I have only 15 specimens of 
this tribe from New Guinea, they include 3 
genera and 7 species, and all the species are 
different from the single pseudomorphine 
{Adelotopus papuanus) previously known 
from the island. ( An ^^ Adelotopus sp.^' listed 
from New (Guinea by Heller, in Abhand- 
lungen und Berichte Zool. Mus. Dresden 
13, 1910, No. 3, p. 4, has not been identi- 
fied.) Because my material is very limited 
and because the species are well defined 
by easily seen characters, I shall treat the 
members of this tribe rather superficially, 
leaving dissection of the mouthparts, etc., 
to the next reviser of the tribe as a whole. 
Notman's ( 1925 ) keys to the Australian 
species of this tribe are very useful but, 
because they are based largely on old de- 
scrij^jtions rather than on specimens, the\' 
should be used with caution. 

Most Australian Pseudomorphini live on 
the tnuiks of trees, especially on the shaggy 
trunks of Euealyplus. They are v(My active, 
winged beetles. I do not know tiie habits 
ol the New Guinean h)rms. 



' The lollowiiiji; notes arc necessary to justify 
my siininiar\ of [\\c distrihiition ot this zoot^t'o- 
.Uraphically iiilcrcstinu tribe. The African Ihj- 
ilroporoDiorplui has only 1 entire \entral abdominal 
sesnients; it is not a pscucloniorphine but probabK 
a harpaline. Paus.sotwpus is Australian and jirob- 
ably does not occur on Batchian Is. ( \otnian 
1925, p. 5, footnote; conlirnied 1)\ nie at the 
British Mus. in 1948). And SilplioiiioiplKi 
cntiaroidcs (Newman), listed from Oceania 1)\ 
Csiki (1933, p. 1639), is probably really Aus- 
tralian; Newman kIvcs no localit\' except "Its 
habitat is 3753," but lie refers to the inseit as 
''this jircttx' antipodean. 



Key to Gener.\ of Pseudomorphini of 
New Guinea 

1. Eyes superior in position, not interrupting 
lateral margins of heatl (p. 240) _ _ Adelotopus 

- Eyes lateral in position, broadly interrupting 
lateral margins of head __ 2 

2. Form wider, more depressed; head not 
strongK deflexed, labrum and mandibles 
\isible from in front (p. 242) __ SpliaJIoiuorpha 

- Form subc\lindric; head sti"ongl\ deflexed, 
labrum and mantlibles ( except sometimes 
their tips ) not \ isible from in front ( p. 
242 ) Cnjptocephdiontorplia 

Genus ADELOTOPUS Hope 

Hope 1834, Trans. Ent. Soc. London 1, p. 11. 
Notman 1925, Proc. United States National Mus. 

67, Art. 14, pp. 5, 6. 
Csiki 1933, Coleop. Cat., Carabidae, Harpalinae 8, 

p. 1634 (see for additional references). 

Diciii^nosis. See preceding Key to Genera. 

Description. None required here. 

Type species. A. '^yrinoidcs Hope, of 
Australia. 

Generic distribution. Australia including 
Tasniania (many species). New Guinea 
( 4 species ) , and Java ( 1 species ) . 

Notes. A. jaeohsoni Ritsema ( 1909, Notes 
Leiden Mus. 31, p. 255) of Java evidently 
realK' is an Adelotopus, not a Cryptoeephalo- 
morpha, for Ritsema knew both genera. 

Key to SrEf:]Ks of Adei.otoi'I s of New GnNF..\ 

!. Piceous, with narrow reddish tianslucent 
margins i)ut otherwise unmarki'd; l